Acute and Critical Care Nurses' Confidence in Implementing Tobacco Cessation Interventions

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/308533
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Acute and Critical Care Nurses' Confidence in Implementing Tobacco Cessation Interventions
Author(s):
Craig, Sarah Jane; Heath, Janie; Lassiter, Larry
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Beta Kappa
Author Details:
Sarah Jane Craig, MSN, RN, CCNS, CCRN, sjw5y@virginia.edu; Janie Heath, PhD, APRN-BC, ANP, ACNP; Larry Lassiter, MSN, RN, CNL
Abstract:

Poster presented on: Saturday, November 16, 2013, Sunday, November 17, 2013

Background In acute care settings it is the responsibility of the nurse to assess the client’s tobacco dependence and provide tobacco cessation teaching prior to discharge from the hospital. The specific aim of this research was to identify factors related to confidence in implementing tobacco cessation interventions in acute care.

Methods A descriptive design was utilized for a 15-item survey at the Nursing Leadership for Tobacco Control exhibit at the American Association of Critical Care Nurses National Teaching Institute (NTI) in Orlando, Florida.  Descriptive statistics were conducted to ascertain the self-reported confidence of acute and critical care nurses to implement interventions in tobacco dependent clients.  A convenience sample of nurses at NTI self-reported confidence and intention to implement tobacco cessation interventions.

Results Surveys were completed by 436 nurses at NTI out of 8,000 nurses.  Pertinent results 75% reported an education level of BSN or higher and 23.9% reported an AND, 65% of responders were certified, 32% were employed by Magnet facilities, and 28% worked at facilities with at least one Beacon Unit.  Ninety-three percent reported an average, above average, or high intention to integrate tobacco cessation interventions into daily nursing practice.  Nurses were most confident in asking about tobacco use (87.6%), advising tobacco cessation (91.4%), and assessing readiness to quit (84%).  Nurses were least confident in assisting clients to quit (78%) and arranging follow-up to quit (65%).  

Conclusion Acute and critical care nurses are confident in assessing for tobacco use, readiness to quit, and advising clients to quit.  Further skill development is required for assisting and arranging follow-up interventions to help clients quit tobacco products.  Acute and critical care settings must continue to strive to create environments which foster professional nursing development through certification, higher education, and benchmarks of nursing excellence such as Beacon units, and Magnet institutions.

Keywords:
Patient education; tobacco cessation
Repository Posting Date:
19-Dec-2013
Date of Publication:
19-Dec-2013
Conference Date:
2013
Conference Name:
42nd Biennial Convention
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursing
Conference Location:
Indianapolis, Indiana, USA
Description:
42nd Biennial Convention 2013 Theme: Give Back to Move Forward. Held at the JW Marriott
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_GB
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_GB
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleAcute and Critical Care Nurses' Confidence in Implementing Tobacco Cessation Interventionsen_GB
dc.contributor.authorCraig, Sarah Janeen_GB
dc.contributor.authorHeath, Janieen_GB
dc.contributor.authorLassiter, Larryen_GB
dc.contributor.departmentBeta Kappaen_GB
dc.author.detailsSarah Jane Craig, MSN, RN, CCNS, CCRN, sjw5y@virginia.edu; Janie Heath, PhD, APRN-BC, ANP, ACNP; Larry Lassiter, MSN, RN, CNLen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/308533-
dc.description.abstract<p>Poster presented on: Saturday, November 16, 2013, Sunday, November 17, 2013</p><b>Background </b>In acute care settings it is the responsibility of the nurse to assess the client’s tobacco dependence and provide tobacco cessation teaching prior to discharge from the hospital. The specific aim of this research was to identify factors related to confidence in implementing tobacco cessation interventions in acute care. <p><b>Methods </b>A descriptive design was utilized for a 15-item survey at the Nursing Leadership for Tobacco Control exhibit at the American Association of Critical Care Nurses National Teaching Institute (NTI) in Orlando, Florida.  Descriptive statistics were conducted to ascertain the self-reported confidence of acute and critical care nurses to implement interventions in tobacco dependent clients.  A convenience sample of nurses at NTI self-reported confidence and intention to implement tobacco cessation interventions. <p><b>Results </b>Surveys were completed by 436 nurses at NTI out of 8,000 nurses.  Pertinent results 75% reported an education level of BSN or higher and 23.9% reported an AND, 65% of responders were certified, 32% were employed by Magnet facilities, and 28% worked at facilities with at least one Beacon Unit.  Ninety-three percent reported an average, above average, or high intention to integrate tobacco cessation interventions into daily nursing practice.  Nurses were most confident in asking about tobacco use (87.6%), advising tobacco cessation (91.4%), and assessing readiness to quit (84%).  Nurses were least confident in assisting clients to quit (78%) and arranging follow-up to quit (65%).   <p><b>Conclusion </b>Acute and critical care nurses are confident in assessing for tobacco use, readiness to quit, and advising clients to quit.  Further skill development is required for assisting and arranging follow-up interventions to help clients quit tobacco products.  Acute and critical care settings must continue to strive to create environments which foster professional nursing development through certification, higher education, and benchmarks of nursing excellence such as Beacon units, and Magnet institutions.en_GB
dc.subjectPatient educationen_GB
dc.subjecttobacco cessationen_GB
dc.date.available2013-12-19T17:32:35Z-
dc.date.issued2013-12-19-
dc.date.accessioned2013-12-19T17:32:35Z-
dc.conference.date2013en_GB
dc.conference.name42nd Biennial Conventionen_GB
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursingen_GB
dc.conference.locationIndianapolis, Indiana, USAen_GB
dc.description42nd Biennial Convention 2013 Theme: Give Back to Move Forward. Held at the JW Marriotten_GB
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission.en_GB
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