Na zdrovya: A qualitative inquiry of the Russian-American immigrant population and the effects of cultural change

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/308534
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Na zdrovya: A qualitative inquiry of the Russian-American immigrant population and the effects of cultural change
Author(s):
Sherrod, Melissa McIntire; Sherrod, Nicholas McIntire
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Beta Alpha
Author Details:
Melissa McIntire Sherrod, PhD, RN, m.sherrod@tcu.edu; Nicholas McIntire Sherrod, BA, BSN, RN
Abstract:

Session presented on: Saturday, November 16, 2013

Researchers from various disciplines have studied health differences between immigrants to the U.S. and native-born Americans.  Many posit that immigrants come to the U.S. with a health advantage even if their native country is poor or developing.  In studies related to health status of new arrivals, immigrants bring aspects of culture, tradition, tight family social networks, and community social networks that allow them to withstand the deleterious impacts of American culture. This phenomenon is called the “Healthy Immigrant Effect” (HIE). With time spent in the U.S., however, this health advantage erodes.  Most studies have been conducted on Hispanics arriving in the U.S. although a similar pattern has been documented in other major immigrant receiving countries, including Canada and Australia.
What is not generally known is the extent to which these health differences exist in other immigrant groups.  This study explored the health status of Russian immigrants who have lived in a community in central Texas for various lengths of time. Health status was explored by investigating experiences as they were lived, reflecting on how essential themes characterize the experiences, and comparing them to those reported in the literature for other immigrant groups.
According to the U.S. Census, the foreign born population was at an all-time high in 2010, with an increase of 27 million people since 2000.  The large and increasing presence of immigrants highlights the importance of monitoring immigrant health since their health has a significant impact on the overall health outcomes of the general population.  Nursing is under increasing pressure to provide culturally sensitive care to all populations.  In order to design care delivery that serves diverse groups, it is important to recognize that all are not the same and in the case of immigrants, all may not arrive with better or equal health status.
Keywords:
immigrants; health promotion; Russian-American
Repository Posting Date:
19-Dec-2013
Date of Publication:
19-Dec-2013
Conference Date:
2013
Conference Name:
42nd Biennial Convention
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursing
Conference Location:
Indianapolis, Indiana, USA
Description:
42nd Biennial Convention 2013 Theme: Give Back to Move Forward. Held at the JW Marriott

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_GB
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_GB
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleNa zdrovya: A qualitative inquiry of the Russian-American immigrant population and the effects of cultural changeen_GB
dc.contributor.authorSherrod, Melissa McIntireen_GB
dc.contributor.authorSherrod, Nicholas McIntireen_GB
dc.contributor.departmentBeta Alphaen_GB
dc.author.detailsMelissa McIntire Sherrod, PhD, RN, m.sherrod@tcu.edu; Nicholas McIntire Sherrod, BA, BSN, RNen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/308534-
dc.description.abstract<p>Session presented on: Saturday, November 16, 2013</p>Researchers from various disciplines have studied health differences between immigrants to the U.S. and native-born Americans.  Many posit that immigrants come to the U.S. with a health advantage even if their native country is poor or developing.  In studies related to health status of new arrivals, immigrants bring aspects of culture, tradition, tight family social networks, and community social networks that allow them to withstand the deleterious impacts of American culture. This phenomenon is called the “Healthy Immigrant Effect” (HIE). With time spent in the U.S., however, this health advantage erodes.  Most studies have been conducted on Hispanics arriving in the U.S. although a similar pattern has been documented in other major immigrant receiving countries, including Canada and Australia.<br /="/">What is not generally known is the extent to which these health differences exist in other immigrant groups.  This study explored the health status of Russian immigrants who have lived in a community in central Texas for various lengths of time. Health status was explored by investigating experiences as they were lived, reflecting on how essential themes characterize the experiences, and comparing them to those reported in the literature for other immigrant groups.<br /="/">According to the U.S. Census, the foreign born population was at an all-time high in 2010, with an increase of 27 million people since 2000.  The large and increasing presence of immigrants highlights the importance of monitoring immigrant health since their health has a significant impact on the overall health outcomes of the general population.  Nursing is under increasing pressure to provide culturally sensitive care to all populations.  In order to design care delivery that serves diverse groups, it is important to recognize that all are not the same and in the case of immigrants, all may not arrive with better or equal health status.en_GB
dc.subjectimmigrantsen_GB
dc.subjecthealth promotionen_GB
dc.subjectRussian-Americanen_GB
dc.date.available2013-12-19T17:32:35Z-
dc.date.issued2013-12-19-
dc.date.accessioned2013-12-19T17:32:35Z-
dc.conference.date2013en_GB
dc.conference.name42nd Biennial Conventionen_GB
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursingen_GB
dc.conference.locationIndianapolis, Indiana, USAen_GB
dc.description42nd Biennial Convention 2013 Theme: Give Back to Move Forward. Held at the JW Marriotten_GB
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