The Moral Obligation to Support New Registered Nurses' Adaptation

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/308541
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The Moral Obligation to Support New Registered Nurses' Adaptation
Author(s):
Ashton, Kathleen S.
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Beta Epsilon
Author Details:
Kathleen S. Ashton, PhD, RN, kathleen.ashton@duke.edu
Abstract:

Session presented on: Sunday, November 17, 2013

Background: Despite increased awareness of new Registered Nurses’ needs and a proliferation of programs designed to support them, new Registered Nurses (new RNs)  continue to report high levels of work-related stress, multiple challenges, and negative emotional responses during their first year in practice.  The emphasis on the financial aspects of supporting new RNs in much of the current nursing literature has obscured nursing leaders’ basic obligation to facilitate new RNs’ personal and professional adaptation.

Aim and Methods: A cross-sectional, correlational research study guided by the Roy Adaptation Model was developed to explore adaptation in new RNs.  Eleven independent variables were modeled with four measures of adaptation: acute occupational fatigue, chronic occupational fatigue, negative affect, and intent to stay in their current position for two years.   The New Registered Nurse Questionnaire was mailed to a random sample of 250 new registered nurses in North Carolina with a professional tenure of 52 weeks or less.  Data from 88 new registered nurses were included for analyses.   

Results: Participants reported a mean acute occupational fatigue score of 64.88 (SD = 19.69) out of a possible zero to 100.  The mean score for chronic occupational fatigue was 41.86 (SD = 23.13).  Of the eleven independent variables, only orientation status and perceived adjustment were statistically significant in their relationship with chronic occupational fatigue and negative affect.  The mean score for new RNs’ intent to stay in their current position for two years was 3.38 (SD = 1.39) on a scale of one (very unlikely) to five (very likely).   

Implications: The results of this study suggest that new RNs are experiencing a compromised adaptive response.  Nursing leaders will demonstrate a moral commitment to new RNs when they target resources toward understanding this phenomenon more fully and use that knowledge to facilitate new RNs’ adaptation.

Keywords:
Occupational Fatigue; New Registered Nurses; Adaptation
Repository Posting Date:
19-Dec-2013
Date of Publication:
19-Dec-2013
Conference Date:
2013
Conference Name:
42nd Biennial Convention
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursing
Conference Location:
Indianapolis, Indiana, USA
Description:
42nd Biennial Convention 2013 Theme: Give Back to Move Forward. Held at the JW Marriott

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_GB
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_GB
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThe Moral Obligation to Support New Registered Nurses' Adaptationen_GB
dc.contributor.authorAshton, Kathleen S.en_GB
dc.contributor.departmentBeta Epsilonen_GB
dc.author.detailsKathleen S. Ashton, PhD, RN, kathleen.ashton@duke.eduen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/308541-
dc.description.abstract<p>Session presented on: Sunday, November 17, 2013</p><b>Background</b>: Despite increased awareness of new Registered Nurses’ needs and a proliferation of programs designed to support them, new Registered Nurses (new RNs)  continue to report high levels of work-related stress, multiple challenges, and negative emotional responses during their first year in practice.  The emphasis on the financial aspects of supporting new RNs in much of the current nursing literature has obscured nursing leaders’ basic obligation to facilitate new RNs’ personal and professional adaptation. <p><b>Aim and Methods</b>: A cross-sectional, correlational research study guided by the Roy Adaptation Model was developed to explore adaptation in new RNs.  Eleven independent variables were modeled with four measures of adaptation: acute occupational fatigue, chronic occupational fatigue, negative affect, and intent to stay in their current position for two years.   The New Registered Nurse Questionnaire was mailed to a random sample of 250 new registered nurses in North Carolina with a professional tenure of 52 weeks or less.  Data from 88 new registered nurses were included for analyses.    <p><b>Results</b>: Participants reported a mean acute occupational fatigue score of 64.88 (SD = 19.69) out of a possible zero to 100.  The mean score for chronic occupational fatigue was 41.86 (SD = 23.13).  Of the eleven independent variables, only orientation status and perceived adjustment were statistically significant in their relationship with chronic occupational fatigue and negative affect.  The mean score for new RNs’ intent to stay in their current position for two years was 3.38 (SD = 1.39) on a scale of one (very unlikely) to five (very likely).    <p><b>Implications</b>: The results of this study suggest that new RNs are experiencing a compromised adaptive response.  Nursing leaders will demonstrate a moral commitment to new RNs when they target resources toward understanding this phenomenon more fully and use that knowledge to facilitate new RNs’ adaptation.en_GB
dc.subjectOccupational Fatigueen_GB
dc.subjectNew Registered Nursesen_GB
dc.subjectAdaptationen_GB
dc.date.available2013-12-19T17:32:41Z-
dc.date.issued2013-12-19-
dc.date.accessioned2013-12-19T17:32:41Z-
dc.conference.date2013en_GB
dc.conference.name42nd Biennial Conventionen_GB
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursingen_GB
dc.conference.locationIndianapolis, Indiana, USAen_GB
dc.description42nd Biennial Convention 2013 Theme: Give Back to Move Forward. Held at the JW Marriotten_GB
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