2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/308574
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Advancing Hypertension (HTN) Control & Self-Management
Author(s):
Lobb, Maureen O'Hagan; Vaughn, Phyllis J.; Cherian, Mercy; Jones, LaGaunda C.; Kumpalappallil, Annamma
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Theta Tau
Author Details:
Maureen O'Hagan Lobb, PhD, RN, CDE, maureen.lobb@va.gov; Phyllis J. Vaughn, BSN, RN; Mercy Cherian, RN; LaGaunda C. Jones, MS, RN, NEA-BC; Annamma Kumpalappallil, RN
Abstract:

Session presented on: Monday, November 18, 2013

Hypertension, the most common chronic condition, affects 68 million Americans at a cost of $131 billion annually in direct medical expenses.1 Major obstacles to achieving HTN control include lack of aggressive provider response to uncontrolled blood pressure and non-optimal self-management, including insufficient patient adherence and persistence with HTN treatment regimens. Half of patients diagnosed with HTN stop taking their medication within one year.2,3  In response to deficiencies in meeting benchmarks (BM) for clinic patients in a large urban medical center, a program to advance HTN control and self-management was implemented in one outpatient medical clinic. Provider Alert Cards were introduced as a pilot to notify providers of elevated values on appointment day. Nurses also educated patients on modifiable risks to decrease blood pressure and technological resources to support risk reduction efforts (electronic health record, provider email access etc); they followed up by phone to assess and encourage self-management, timely prescription refills, and adherence to medication regimens. Patients were provided with home blood pressure monitoring devices and logs for recording readings. Instructions were given on actions to take for out of range values. Upon implementing this intervention, the next four quarter’s BM’s for HTN control exceeded facility standards and led to sharing the innovation with all Medical Center clinics. Subsequent HTN data demonstrate sustained improvement across the outpatient settings. In conclusion, promoting optimal HTN control and self-management requires a multifaceted, interdisciplinary approach. Implications for nursing practice include individualize assessment and patient-nurse collaboration in planning care to minimize obstacles and maximize adherence and persistence with regime. Provider alerts are an important tool for focusing attention on out-of-range blood pressure readings during clinic visits. 2,3,4
Keywords:
Quality Improvement; Interdisciplinary communication; Hypertension
Repository Posting Date:
19-Dec-2013
Date of Publication:
19-Dec-2013
Conference Date:
2013
Conference Name:
42nd Biennial Convention
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursing
Conference Location:
Indianapolis, Indiana, USA
Description:
42nd Biennial Convention 2013 Theme: Give Back to Move Forward. Held at the JW Marriott

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_GB
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_GB
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleAdvancing Hypertension (HTN) Control & Self-Managementen_GB
dc.contributor.authorLobb, Maureen O'Haganen_GB
dc.contributor.authorVaughn, Phyllis J.en_GB
dc.contributor.authorCherian, Mercyen_GB
dc.contributor.authorJones, LaGaunda C.en_GB
dc.contributor.authorKumpalappallil, Annammaen_GB
dc.contributor.departmentTheta Tauen_GB
dc.author.detailsMaureen O'Hagan Lobb, PhD, RN, CDE, maureen.lobb@va.gov; Phyllis J. Vaughn, BSN, RN; Mercy Cherian, RN; LaGaunda C. Jones, MS, RN, NEA-BC; Annamma Kumpalappallil, RNen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/308574-
dc.description.abstract<p>Session presented on: Monday, November 18, 2013</p>Hypertension, the most common chronic condition, affects 68 million Americans at a cost of $131 billion annually in direct medical expenses.<sup>1</sup> Major obstacles to achieving HTN control include lack of aggressive provider response to uncontrolled blood pressure and non-optimal self-management, including insufficient patient adherence and persistence with HTN treatment regimens. Half of patients diagnosed with HTN stop taking their medication within one year.<sup>2,3  </sup>In response to deficiencies in meeting benchmarks (BM) for clinic patients in a large urban medical center, a program to advance HTN control and self-management was implemented in one outpatient medical clinic. Provider Alert Cards were introduced as a pilot to notify providers of elevated values on appointment day. Nurses also educated patients on modifiable risks to decrease blood pressure and technological resources to support risk reduction efforts (electronic health record, provider email access etc); they followed up by phone to assess and encourage self-management, timely prescription refills, and adherence to medication regimens. Patients were provided with home blood pressure monitoring devices and logs for recording readings. Instructions were given on actions to take for out of range values. Upon implementing this intervention, the next four quarter’s BM’s for HTN control exceeded facility standards and led to sharing the innovation with all Medical Center clinics. Subsequent HTN data demonstrate sustained improvement across the outpatient settings. In conclusion, promoting optimal HTN control and self-management requires a multifaceted, interdisciplinary approach. Implications for nursing practice include individualize assessment and patient-nurse collaboration in planning care to minimize obstacles and maximize adherence and persistence with regime. Provider alerts are an important tool for focusing attention on out-of-range blood pressure readings during clinic visits.<sup> 2,3,4</sup>en_GB
dc.subjectQuality Improvementen_GB
dc.subjectInterdisciplinary communicationen_GB
dc.subjectHypertensionen_GB
dc.date.available2013-12-19T17:33:06Z-
dc.date.issued2013-12-19-
dc.date.accessioned2013-12-19T17:33:06Z-
dc.conference.date2013en_GB
dc.conference.name42nd Biennial Conventionen_GB
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursingen_GB
dc.conference.locationIndianapolis, Indiana, USAen_GB
dc.description42nd Biennial Convention 2013 Theme: Give Back to Move Forward. Held at the JW Marriotten_GB
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