Do you have what it takes to be a leader in nursing education: attributes of leaders and barriers to leadership

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/308588
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Do you have what it takes to be a leader in nursing education: attributes of leaders and barriers to leadership
Author(s):
Krouse, Anne Marie; Patterson, Barbara J.
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Non-member
Author Details:
Anne Marie Krouse, PhD, MBA, RN-BC, amkrouse@widener.edu; Barbara J. Patterson, PhD, RN, ANEF
Abstract:

Session presented on: Monday, November 18, 2013

Background: A healthy academic work environment requires good leadership.  Unfortunately, not all individuals in leadership roles in nursing education are effective leaders. Little has been reported in the literature about the characteristics that are essential to be an effective leader in nursing education.

Purpose: The purpose of this study was to describe the essential attributes of leaders in nursing education. The barriers to leadership were also explored.

Methods: The research design was qualitative description.  Fifteen leaders in nursing education were interviewed.  Data were analyzed using an inductive approach combined with an iterative reflective process.  Trustworthiness was established through an audit trail and member checks.

Results: Two categories of attributes emerged from the data; individual characteristics and behavioral attributes. Individual characteristics include hard-working, persistent, ethical, visionary, credible, analytical, resilient, confident, and passionate. Behavioral attributes include risk taking, leading from behind, thoughtful decision-making, self-reflection, building relationships, communicating effectively, respecting others, financial stewardship, influencing others, caring for oneself, infusing and encouraging innovation, trusting others, and being a citizen of the university. Barriers included a lack of preparation for leadership, the demands of leadership roles, cultural and environmental factors, financial, and factors related to individuals in current leadership positions.

Conclusions: Leaders in nursing education face multiple challenges in roles. It is essential that future leaders understand the elements of leadership that contribute to the achievement of organizational goals and creation and maintenance of an optimal academic environment.

Keywords:
attributes; leadership; nursing education
Repository Posting Date:
19-Dec-2013
Date of Publication:
19-Dec-2013
Conference Date:
2013
Conference Name:
42nd Biennial Convention
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursing
Conference Location:
Indianapolis, Indiana, USA
Description:
42nd Biennial Convention 2013 Theme: Give Back to Move Forward. Held at the JW Marriott
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_GB
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_GB
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleDo you have what it takes to be a leader in nursing education: attributes of leaders and barriers to leadershipen_GB
dc.contributor.authorKrouse, Anne Marieen_GB
dc.contributor.authorPatterson, Barbara J.en_GB
dc.contributor.departmentNon-memberen_GB
dc.author.detailsAnne Marie Krouse, PhD, MBA, RN-BC, amkrouse@widener.edu; Barbara J. Patterson, PhD, RN, ANEFen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/308588-
dc.description.abstract<p>Session presented on: Monday, November 18, 2013</p>Background: A healthy academic work environment requires good leadership.  Unfortunately, not all individuals in leadership roles in nursing education are effective leaders. Little has been reported in the literature about the characteristics that are essential to be an effective leader in nursing education. <p>Purpose: The purpose of this study was to describe the essential attributes of leaders in nursing education. The barriers to leadership were also explored. <p>Methods: The research design was qualitative description.  Fifteen leaders in nursing education were interviewed.  Data were analyzed using an inductive approach combined with an iterative reflective process.  Trustworthiness was established through an audit trail and member checks. <p>Results: Two categories of attributes emerged from the data; individual characteristics and behavioral attributes. Individual characteristics include hard-working, persistent, ethical, visionary, credible, analytical, resilient, confident, and passionate. Behavioral attributes include risk taking, leading from behind, thoughtful decision-making, self-reflection, building relationships, communicating effectively, respecting others, financial stewardship, influencing others, caring for oneself, infusing and encouraging innovation, trusting others, and being a citizen of the university. Barriers included a lack of preparation for leadership, the demands of leadership roles, cultural and environmental factors, financial, and factors related to individuals in current leadership positions. <p>Conclusions: Leaders in nursing education face multiple challenges in roles. It is essential that future leaders understand the elements of leadership that contribute to the achievement of organizational goals and creation and maintenance of an optimal academic environment.en_GB
dc.subjectattributesen_GB
dc.subjectleadershipen_GB
dc.subjectnursing educationen_GB
dc.date.available2013-12-19T17:33:16Z-
dc.date.issued2013-12-19-
dc.date.accessioned2013-12-19T17:33:16Z-
dc.conference.date2013en_GB
dc.conference.name42nd Biennial Conventionen_GB
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursingen_GB
dc.conference.locationIndianapolis, Indiana, USAen_GB
dc.description42nd Biennial Convention 2013 Theme: Give Back to Move Forward. Held at the JW Marriotten_GB
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission.en_GB
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