Perceptions of midwives regarding incorporating indigenous postnatal care practices into midwifery healthcare system

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/308603
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Perceptions of midwives regarding incorporating indigenous postnatal care practices into midwifery healthcare system
Author(s):
Mulaudzi, Fhumulani Mavis
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Non-member
Author Details:
Mulaudzi Mavis FM Mavis Mulaudzi, D Litt et Phil, University of Pretoria, Department of Nursing Science, Mavis.Mulaudzi@up.ac.za
Abstract:

Session presented on: Sunday, November 17, 2013

PERCEPTIONS OF MIDWIVES REGARDING INCORPORATING INDIGENOUS POSTNATAL CARE PRACTICES INTO MIDWIFERY HEALTHCARE SYSTEM

R.N, Ngunyulu, MCur, University of Pretoria, Department of Nursing Sciences

F.M, Mulaudzi, D Litt et Phil, University of Pretoria, Department of Nursing Science

M.D, Peu, PhD, University of Pretoria, Department of Nursing Science

Abstract

There is concern that midwives in South Africa are failing to provide culturally congruent postnatal care due to inadequate culturally competent knowledge and skills, as they were trained only within the biomedical paradigm. Indigenous postnatal care practices are not included in the midwifery curriculum. As a result, midwives operate within a western point of view only, instead of combining indigenous and western healthcare practices. The inability of midwives to provide culturally congruent care results in substandard care according to standards of practice for culturally competent nursing care. The provision of substandard postnatal care puts the patient’s health at risk of complications and even death. A qualitative study using in-depth individual interviews were conducted with midwives to determine their perceptions regarding incorporating indigenous postnatal care practices into the midwifery healthcare system. The midwives suggested that indigenous postnatal care practices should be incorporated into the midwifery healthcare system to empower midwives with culturally competent knowledge and skills. Cultural competency might assist midwives to develop a positive attitude towards patients of diverse cultures and to accept traditional birth attendants. Further research must be conducted to discover strategies to incorporate indigenous postnatal care practices into the midwifery healthcare system.

Keywords: indigenous practices, midwife, perceptions, postnatal care

Keywords:
Perceptions; Postnatal care; Indigenous practice
Repository Posting Date:
19-Dec-2013
Date of Publication:
19-Dec-2013
Conference Date:
2013
Conference Name:
42nd Biennial Convention
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursing
Conference Location:
Indianapolis, Indiana, USA
Description:
42nd Biennial Convention 2013 Theme: Give Back to Move Forward. Held at the JW Marriott

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_GB
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_GB
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titlePerceptions of midwives regarding incorporating indigenous postnatal care practices into midwifery healthcare systemen_GB
dc.contributor.authorMulaudzi, Fhumulani Mavisen_GB
dc.contributor.departmentNon-memberen_GB
dc.author.detailsMulaudzi Mavis FM Mavis Mulaudzi, D Litt et Phil, University of Pretoria, Department of Nursing Science, Mavis.Mulaudzi@up.ac.zaen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/308603-
dc.description.abstract<p>Session presented on: Sunday, November 17, 2013</p><b>PERCEPTIONS OF MIDWIVES REGARDING INCORPORATING INDIGENOUS POSTNATAL CARE PRACTICES INTO MIDWIFERY HEALTHCARE SYSTEM</b><p><b>R.N, Ngunyulu, </b>MCur, University of Pretoria, Department of Nursing Sciences<b></b><p><b>F.M, Mulaudzi, </b>D Litt et Phil, University of Pretoria, Department of Nursing Science<b></b><p><b>M.D, Peu, PhD</b>, University of Pretoria, Department of Nursing Science <p><b>Abstract</b><p>There is concern that midwives in South Africa are failing to provide culturally congruent postnatal care due to inadequate culturally competent knowledge and skills, as they were trained only within the biomedical paradigm. Indigenous postnatal care practices are not included in the midwifery curriculum. As a result, midwives operate within a western point of view only, instead of combining indigenous and western healthcare practices. The inability of midwives to provide culturally congruent care results in substandard care according to standards of practice for culturally competent nursing care. The provision of substandard postnatal care puts the patient’s health at risk of complications and even death. A qualitative study using in-depth individual interviews were conducted with midwives to determine their perceptions regarding incorporating indigenous postnatal care practices into the midwifery healthcare system. The midwives suggested that indigenous postnatal care practices should be incorporated into the midwifery healthcare system to empower midwives with culturally competent knowledge and skills. Cultural competency might assist midwives to develop a positive attitude towards patients of diverse cultures and to accept traditional birth attendants. Further research must be conducted to discover strategies to incorporate indigenous postnatal care practices into the midwifery healthcare system. <p><b>Keywords</b>: indigenous practices, midwife, perceptions, postnatal careen_GB
dc.subjectPerceptionsen_GB
dc.subjectPostnatal careen_GB
dc.subjectIndigenous practiceen_GB
dc.date.available2013-12-19T17:33:29Z-
dc.date.issued2013-12-19-
dc.date.accessioned2013-12-19T17:33:29Z-
dc.conference.date2013en_GB
dc.conference.name42nd Biennial Conventionen_GB
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursingen_GB
dc.conference.locationIndianapolis, Indiana, USAen_GB
dc.description42nd Biennial Convention 2013 Theme: Give Back to Move Forward. Held at the JW Marriotten_GB
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