If you build it, will they come? Describing the process of building community capacity for intervention research with underserved minority populations

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/308609
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
If you build it, will they come? Describing the process of building community capacity for intervention research with underserved minority populations
Author(s):
Kue, Jennifer; Marshall, Sharon; Carmona, Richard H.; Menon, Usha; Palm, Chuck; Sarkar, Madhurima; Pleasant, Andrew; Warren, Barbara; Szalacha, Laura; Cabe, Jennifer
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Non-member
Author Details:
Jennifer Kue, PhD, kue.2@osu.edu; Sharon Marshall, MEd; Richard H. Carmona, MD, MPH, FACS; Usha Menon, PhD, RN, FAAN; Chuck Palm, MPH; Madhurima Sarkar, PhD; Andrew Pleasant, PhD; Barbara Warren, PhD, RN, CNS-BC, PMH, FAAN; Laura Szalacha, EdD; Jennifer Cabe, MA
Abstract:

Session presented on: Sunday, November 17, 2013

Purpose:Community-centered intervention research involves active participation of community members at all levels of the research process and, in turn, can enrich the quality of the study, produce more relevant results, and set the stage for programmatic sustainability. At the same time, conducting community-centered intervention research also has unique challenges. This presentation will detail the process of community engagement using the exemplar of adapting the Canyon Ranch Institute Life Enhancement Program™ (CRI LEP) for underserved Midwestern communities. It will also share lessons learned from the process of developing an interdisciplinary research team. Methodological and practical issues related to conducting research with underserved minority populations will be discussed.

Methods:  We sought to formalize a collaborative partnership between The Ohio State University, partners from Columbus Near East Side neighborhood, and the non-profit Canyon Ranch Institute. The Multi-ethnic Community Health Advisory Committee is comprised of key community leaders, community organizers, health advocates, and university researchers. Research team discussions, insights from the advisory committee, and project documents were sources of information about the process of building capacity for intervention research in Columbus’ Near East Side.

Results:  Methodological and practical issues include understanding and prioritizing health disparities in the target population, building community partnerships and support, establishing and working with a community advisory committee, dealing with competing health programs in the community, adapting a validated program to the targeted population, using culturally appropriate materials and methods, and addressing health literacy issues. 

Conclusion:  Comprehensive strategies are needed to ensure the collaboration process is culturally appropriate and equitable. The lessons learned from our experiences can inform future research with underserved minority communities.

Keywords:
underserved minority populations; culturally appropriate methods; community-centered research
Repository Posting Date:
19-Dec-2013
Date of Publication:
19-Dec-2013
Conference Date:
2013
Conference Name:
42nd Biennial Convention
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursing
Conference Location:
Indianapolis, Indiana, USA
Description:
42nd Biennial Convention 2013 Theme: Give Back to Move Forward. Held at the JW Marriott

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_GB
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_GB
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleIf you build it, will they come? Describing the process of building community capacity for intervention research with underserved minority populationsen_GB
dc.contributor.authorKue, Jenniferen_GB
dc.contributor.authorMarshall, Sharonen_GB
dc.contributor.authorCarmona, Richard H.en_GB
dc.contributor.authorMenon, Ushaen_GB
dc.contributor.authorPalm, Chucken_GB
dc.contributor.authorSarkar, Madhurimaen_GB
dc.contributor.authorPleasant, Andrewen_GB
dc.contributor.authorWarren, Barbaraen_GB
dc.contributor.authorSzalacha, Lauraen_GB
dc.contributor.authorCabe, Jenniferen_GB
dc.contributor.departmentNon-memberen_GB
dc.author.detailsJennifer Kue, PhD, kue.2@osu.edu; Sharon Marshall, MEd; Richard H. Carmona, MD, MPH, FACS; Usha Menon, PhD, RN, FAAN; Chuck Palm, MPH; Madhurima Sarkar, PhD; Andrew Pleasant, PhD; Barbara Warren, PhD, RN, CNS-BC, PMH, FAAN; Laura Szalacha, EdD; Jennifer Cabe, MAen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/308609-
dc.description.abstract<p>Session presented on: Sunday, November 17, 2013</p><b>Purpose:</b>Community-centered intervention research involves active participation of community members at all levels of the research process and, in turn, can enrich the quality of the study, produce more relevant results, and set the stage for programmatic sustainability. At the same time, conducting community-centered intervention research also has unique challenges. This presentation will detail the process of community engagement using the exemplar of adapting the Canyon Ranch Institute Life Enhancement Program™ (CRI LEP) for underserved Midwestern communities. It will also share lessons learned from the process of developing an interdisciplinary research team. Methodological and practical issues related to conducting research with underserved minority populations will be discussed. <p><b>Methods: </b> We sought to formalize a collaborative partnership between The Ohio State University, partners from Columbus Near East Side neighborhood, and the non-profit Canyon Ranch Institute. The Multi-ethnic Community Health Advisory Committee is comprised of key community leaders, community organizers, health advocates, and university researchers. Research team discussions, insights from the advisory committee, and project documents were sources of information about the process of building capacity for intervention research in Columbus’ Near East Side. <p><b>Results:  </b>Methodological and practical issues include understanding and prioritizing health disparities in the target population, building community partnerships and support, establishing and working with a community advisory committee, dealing with competing health programs in the community, adapting a validated program to the targeted population, using culturally appropriate materials and methods, and addressing health literacy issues.  <p><b>Conclusion:  </b>Comprehensive strategies are needed to ensure the collaboration process is culturally appropriate and equitable. The lessons learned from our experiences can inform future research with underserved minority communities.en_GB
dc.subjectunderserved minority populationsen_GB
dc.subjectculturally appropriate methodsen_GB
dc.subjectcommunity-centered researchen_GB
dc.date.available2013-12-19T17:33:33Z-
dc.date.issued2013-12-19-
dc.date.accessioned2013-12-19T17:33:33Z-
dc.conference.date2013en_GB
dc.conference.name42nd Biennial Conventionen_GB
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursingen_GB
dc.conference.locationIndianapolis, Indiana, USAen_GB
dc.description42nd Biennial Convention 2013 Theme: Give Back to Move Forward. Held at the JW Marriotten_GB
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