Women's career development: The lived experience of Canadian university women presidents

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/308613
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Women's career development: The lived experience of Canadian university women presidents
Author(s):
Quinlan, Colleen M.
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Zeta Theta
Author Details:
Colleen M. Quinlan, PhD, WHCNP, colleen.quinlan@utoledo.edu
Abstract:

Session presented on: Tuesday, November 19, 2013

Abstract:

 As of July 2011, the Association of Universities and Colleges of Canada (AUCC) reported women led 17 of its 95 member institutions.  While this represents considerable change since 1974 when Pauline Jewett became the first woman to lead a co-educational Canadian university, progress for women climbing the educational leadership ladder to the office of the university president in Canada has been slow.  The purpose of this study was to describe the lived experiences of Canadian university women presidents as they developed their careers.  Using a phenomenological research approach, individual, in-depth, interviews were conducted with eight women university presidents to investigate perceptions and experiences related to personal and professional opportunities and barriers along their career paths.  Powell and Mainiero’s (1992) career development conceptual framework was adapted to explain how work and non-work issues, subjective measures of success, and the impact of personal, organizational, and societal factors affect women’s career decisions.  Results showed each of the women journeyed through a unique pathway to the presidency, yet their stories shared common themes.  Personal characteristics, family background, educational experiences, and mentoring relationships were identified as critical influences on their career development experiences.  Challenges stemmed from the struggle to balance career goals with caring responsibilities, cope with the inherent difficulties of the role of a university president, and navigate gender issues.  This study is part of a growing body of research on the career experiences of women academic leaders.  Inherent in the research findings are recommendations for individuals and institutions to guide and inform organizational policies and practices related to removing the cultural and structural barriers that impede women’s career advancement.

Keywords:
women; career development; leadership
Repository Posting Date:
19-Dec-2013
Date of Publication:
19-Dec-2013
Conference Date:
2013
Conference Name:
42nd Biennial Convention
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursing
Conference Location:
Indianapolis, Indiana, USA
Description:
42nd Biennial Convention 2013 Theme: Give Back to Move Forward. Held at the JW Marriott

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_GB
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_GB
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleWomen's career development: The lived experience of Canadian university women presidentsen_GB
dc.contributor.authorQuinlan, Colleen M.en_GB
dc.contributor.departmentZeta Thetaen_GB
dc.author.detailsColleen M. Quinlan, PhD, WHCNP, colleen.quinlan@utoledo.eduen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/308613-
dc.description.abstract<p>Session presented on: Tuesday, November 19, 2013</p><p align="center" style="text-align: left;"><b><i>Abstract:</i></b><p><b><i> </i></b>As of July 2011, the Association of Universities and Colleges of Canada (AUCC) reported women led 17 of its 95 member institutions.  While this represents considerable change since 1974 when Pauline Jewett became the first woman to lead a co-educational Canadian university, progress for women climbing the educational leadership ladder to the office of the university president in Canada has been slow.  The purpose of this study was to describe the lived experiences of Canadian university women presidents as they developed their careers.  Using a phenomenological research approach, individual, in-depth, interviews were conducted with eight women university presidents to investigate perceptions and experiences related to personal and professional opportunities and barriers along their career paths.  Powell and Mainiero’s (1992) career development conceptual framework was adapted to explain how work and non-work issues, subjective measures of success, and the impact of personal, organizational, and societal factors affect women’s career decisions.  Results showed each of the women journeyed through a unique pathway to the presidency, yet their stories shared common themes.  Personal characteristics, family background, educational experiences, and mentoring relationships were identified as critical influences on their career development experiences.  Challenges stemmed from the struggle to balance career goals with caring responsibilities, cope with the inherent difficulties of the role of a university president, and navigate gender issues.  This study is part of a growing body of research on the career experiences of women academic leaders.  Inherent in the research findings are recommendations for individuals and institutions to guide and inform organizational policies and practices related to removing the cultural and structural barriers that impede women’s career advancement.en_GB
dc.subjectwomenen_GB
dc.subjectcareer developmenten_GB
dc.subjectleadershipen_GB
dc.date.available2013-12-19T17:33:36Z-
dc.date.issued2013-12-19-
dc.date.accessioned2013-12-19T17:33:36Z-
dc.conference.date2013en_GB
dc.conference.name42nd Biennial Conventionen_GB
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursingen_GB
dc.conference.locationIndianapolis, Indiana, USAen_GB
dc.description42nd Biennial Convention 2013 Theme: Give Back to Move Forward. Held at the JW Marriotten_GB
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.