Intersection of Poverty and Abuse: A Descriptive Analysis of Entry Data from a Seven-Year Prospective Study

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/308614
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Intersection of Poverty and Abuse: A Descriptive Analysis of Entry Data from a Seven-Year Prospective Study
Author(s):
Bianchi, Ann
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Beta Phi
Author Details:
Ann Bianchi, MSN, RN, abianchi@twu.edu
Abstract:

Session presented on: Tuesday, November 19, 2013

Aims: Congruent with 2011 Institute of Medicine (IOM) guidelines which note the disproportionate impact of intimate partner violence on women's lives, this research offers important evidence on the impact of poverty on abused women's functioning. When factors, such as poverty, are further explained in relationship to partner violence, interventions can be tailored to improve the safety, health, and functioning of abused women and their children. 

Methods: A cross-sectional analysis of entry data from a longitudinal, seven-year prospective study comparing the safety, health, and functioning outcomes of 300 abused women and their children who, for the first time, sought protection through the justice system or assistance from a women’s shelter.  A 7-item scale measured symptoms of PTSD and the 18-item Brief Symptom Inventory (BSI) measured symptoms of depression, anxiety, and somatization. Data analysis was completed with descriptive statistics, ANOVA, regression, and effects testing.

Results: Regardless of level of income, women in all groups reported similar PTSD symptoms as a result of their abuse.  However, women seeking protection orders who had no income had higher anxiety and somatization scores when compared to those who had some source of income.  Conversely,, women in shelters who reported income, whether above or below poverty, had higher anxiety scores when compared to sheltered women with no reported income.  Children of sheltered women were found to have greater behavioral dysfunction compared to children of women who use justice services, regardless of the mother’s poverty status.

Conclusions: Study findings support associations between intimate partner violence, poverty and maternal mental health and support the directional pathways described in our emerging conceptual model. Strategies to improve financial solvency of women who have experienced IPV may be one step in breaking the cycle of violence.

Keywords:
Poverty; IPV
Repository Posting Date:
19-Dec-2013
Date of Publication:
19-Dec-2013
Conference Date:
2013
Conference Name:
42nd Biennial Convention
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursing
Conference Location:
Indianapolis, Indiana, USA
Description:
42nd Biennial Convention 2013 Theme: Give Back to Move Forward. Held at the JW Marriott

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_GB
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_GB
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleIntersection of Poverty and Abuse: A Descriptive Analysis of Entry Data from a Seven-Year Prospective Studyen_GB
dc.contributor.authorBianchi, Annen_GB
dc.contributor.departmentBeta Phien_GB
dc.author.detailsAnn Bianchi, MSN, RN, abianchi@twu.eduen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/308614-
dc.description.abstract<p>Session presented on: Tuesday, November 19, 2013</p>Aims: Congruent with 2011 Institute of Medicine (IOM) guidelines which note the disproportionate impact of intimate partner violence on women's lives, this research offers important evidence on the impact of poverty on abused women's functioning. When factors, such as poverty, are further explained in relationship to partner violence, interventions can be tailored to improve the safety, health, and functioning of abused women and their children.  <p>Methods: A cross-sectional analysis of entry data from a longitudinal, seven-year prospective study comparing the safety, health, and functioning outcomes of 300 abused women and their children who, for the first time, sought protection through the justice system or assistance from a women’s shelter.  A 7-item scale measured symptoms of PTSD and the 18-item Brief Symptom Inventory (BSI) measured symptoms of depression, anxiety, and somatization. Data analysis was completed with descriptive statistics, ANOVA, regression, and effects testing. <p>Results: Regardless of level of income, women in all groups reported similar PTSD symptoms as a result of their abuse.  However, women seeking protection orders who had no income had higher anxiety and somatization scores when compared to those who had some source of income.  Conversely,, women in shelters who reported income, whether above or below poverty, had higher anxiety scores when compared to sheltered women with no reported income.  Children of sheltered women were found to have greater behavioral dysfunction compared to children of women who use justice services, regardless of the mother’s poverty status. <p>Conclusions: Study findings support associations between intimate partner violence, poverty and maternal mental health and support the directional pathways described in our emerging conceptual model. Strategies to improve financial solvency of women who have experienced IPV may be one step in breaking the cycle of violence.en_GB
dc.subjectPovertyen_GB
dc.subjectIPVen_GB
dc.date.available2013-12-19T17:33:37Z-
dc.date.issued2013-12-19-
dc.date.accessioned2013-12-19T17:33:37Z-
dc.conference.date2013en_GB
dc.conference.name42nd Biennial Conventionen_GB
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursingen_GB
dc.conference.locationIndianapolis, Indiana, USAen_GB
dc.description42nd Biennial Convention 2013 Theme: Give Back to Move Forward. Held at the JW Marriotten_GB
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