The Influence of Teaching Method on Nursing Student Assessment of Suicide Risk

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/308616
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The Influence of Teaching Method on Nursing Student Assessment of Suicide Risk
Author(s):
Popkess, Ann
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Delta Lambda-at-Large
Author Details:
Ann Popkess, PhD, apopkes@siue.edu
Abstract:

Session presented on: Tuesday, November 19, 2013

Suicide is the eleventh leading cause of death in the United States, with over 34,000 deaths per year (CDC, 2010).  The assessment of risk factors for suicide and the presence of suicidal thoughts is a critical function for nurses.  Educating nursing students about suicide assessment often fails to prepare them adequately to inquire about a patient’s risk of suicide due to the student’s negative attitudes, fear and anxiety (Bajaj, Borreani, Ghosh, Methuen, Patel, & Crawford, 2008; Kameg, Mitchell, Closhesy, Howard, & Suresky; Varcolis, Carson, & Shoemaker, 2006).  This research project developed and tested an innovative active learning strategy, simulated standardized patients, for its effectiveness in teaching suicide assessment skills to a sample of senior nursing students at a Midwestern university.  This study examined the influence of teaching method (simulated standardized patients versus lecture) on student satisfaction, self-confidence, and comprehension of concepts regarding the assessment of suicide risk.  Thirty four students consented to participate in this pilot study.  All subjects completed a 9-item suicide assessment questionnaire (Dr. David Jobes, personal communication), a demographic form, and three simulation measurement scales (NLN, 2010).  The use of simulated standardized patients demonstrated a significant difference in student scores of self-confidence, satisfaction, and student perceptions of the educational practices (active learning, collaboration, and appeal to diverse learning styles) when compared to the lecture format.  Nursing students reported that standardized patient encounters were productive and valuable in the context of teaching communication and assessment skills. Student outcomes of learning, however, were not statistically different between the intervention and control groups. Knowledge gained from this study has the potential to improve care for patients at risk for suicide by enhancing the methods used to teach suicide risk assessment techniques to baccalaureate nursing students.
Keywords:
teaching methods; simulated patients; suicide assessment
Repository Posting Date:
19-Dec-2013
Date of Publication:
19-Dec-2013
Conference Date:
2013
Conference Name:
42nd Biennial Convention
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursing
Conference Location:
Indianapolis, Indiana, USA
Description:
42nd Biennial Convention 2013 Theme: Give Back to Move Forward. Held at the JW Marriott

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_GB
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_GB
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThe Influence of Teaching Method on Nursing Student Assessment of Suicide Risken_GB
dc.contributor.authorPopkess, Annen_GB
dc.contributor.departmentDelta Lambda-at-Largeen_GB
dc.author.detailsAnn Popkess, PhD, apopkes@siue.eduen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/308616-
dc.description.abstract<p>Session presented on: Tuesday, November 19, 2013</p>Suicide is the eleventh leading cause of death in the United States, with over 34,000 deaths per year (CDC, 2010).  The assessment of risk factors for suicide and the presence of suicidal thoughts is a critical function for nurses.  Educating nursing students about suicide assessment often fails to prepare them adequately to inquire about a patient’s risk of suicide due to the student’s negative attitudes, fear and anxiety (Bajaj, Borreani, Ghosh, Methuen, Patel, & Crawford, 2008; Kameg, Mitchell, Closhesy, Howard, & Suresky; Varcolis, Carson, & Shoemaker, 2006).  This research project developed and tested an innovative active learning strategy, simulated standardized patients, for its effectiveness in teaching suicide assessment skills to a sample of senior nursing students at a Midwestern university.  This study examined the influence of teaching method (simulated standardized patients versus lecture) on student satisfaction, self-confidence, and comprehension of concepts regarding the assessment of suicide risk.  Thirty four students consented to participate in this pilot study.  All subjects completed a 9-item suicide assessment questionnaire (Dr. David Jobes, personal communication), a demographic form, and three simulation measurement scales (NLN, 2010).  The use of simulated standardized patients demonstrated a significant difference in student scores of self-confidence, satisfaction, and student perceptions of the educational practices (active learning, collaboration, and appeal to diverse learning styles) when compared to the lecture format.  Nursing students reported that standardized patient encounters were productive and valuable in the context of teaching communication and assessment skills. Student outcomes of learning, however, were not statistically different between the intervention and control groups. Knowledge gained from this study has the potential to improve care for patients at risk for suicide by enhancing the methods used to teach suicide risk assessment techniques to baccalaureate nursing students.en_GB
dc.subjectteaching methodsen_GB
dc.subjectsimulated patientsen_GB
dc.subjectsuicide assessmenten_GB
dc.date.available2013-12-19T17:33:39Z-
dc.date.issued2013-12-19-
dc.date.accessioned2013-12-19T17:33:39Z-
dc.conference.date2013en_GB
dc.conference.name42nd Biennial Conventionen_GB
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursingen_GB
dc.conference.locationIndianapolis, Indiana, USAen_GB
dc.description42nd Biennial Convention 2013 Theme: Give Back to Move Forward. Held at the JW Marriotten_GB
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