Reaching Consensus on Competencies of Nurse Educators in Curriculum Design Using a Delphi Technique

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/308624
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Reaching Consensus on Competencies of Nurse Educators in Curriculum Design Using a Delphi Technique
Author(s):
Staykova, Milena P.
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Tau Phi
Author Details:
Milena P. Staykova, EdD, APRN, FNP-BC, mpstaykova@jchs.edu
Abstract:

Session presented on: Sunday, November 17, 2013

The nurse educator shortage leads researchers to question the role of clinical nurses in the academic field. Many clinical nurses who enter academic settings struggle in their new roles as educators because of unclear expectations and professional training. The urgent demand for graduating more professional nurses puts pressure to the novice nurse educators (NLN, 2002). Given the aging faculty workforce, the nontraditional student population, and the lack of standardized curriculum, the work of the new nurse educator becomes more demanding. Despite pleas from professional nursing organizations for competency-based curriculum and curriculum innovation in nursing education, little empirical research exists about the competencies of nurse educators in designing curriculum. The purpose of the study was to help nurse educators reach consensus about the competencies in designing curriculum. Method: In a mixed method 3-rounds Delphi study, 37 panelists from 13 of 22 community colleges in Virginia  used a validated instrument to determined the importance of 160-statements divided into two categories of Mindset and Skillset and three roles such as educators, scholar, and collaborator. Results: Participants reached agreement on 27 of 34 competencies (79%). Several major themes emerged from the qualitative and quantitative data analysis and were organized according to categories and nurse educator roles.  For example, participants achieved 75.3% mean agreement that MSN is the first professional education degree needed for a competent designer. Conclusions: Competencies development in curriculum design should be divided into basic and advance education with focus on workshops to assess personal needs for ongoing professional development in curriculum.
Keywords:
nurse educators.; Competencies,; curriculum design,
Repository Posting Date:
19-Dec-2013
Date of Publication:
19-Dec-2013
Conference Date:
2013
Conference Name:
42nd Biennial Convention
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursing
Conference Location:
Indianapolis, Indiana, USA
Description:
42nd Biennial Convention 2013 Theme: Give Back to Move Forward. Held at the JW Marriott

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_GB
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_GB
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleReaching Consensus on Competencies of Nurse Educators in Curriculum Design Using a Delphi Techniqueen_GB
dc.contributor.authorStaykova, Milena P.en_GB
dc.contributor.departmentTau Phien_GB
dc.author.detailsMilena P. Staykova, EdD, APRN, FNP-BC, mpstaykova@jchs.eduen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/308624-
dc.description.abstract<p>Session presented on: Sunday, November 17, 2013</p>The nurse educator shortage leads researchers to question the role of clinical nurses in the academic field. Many clinical nurses who enter academic settings struggle in their new roles as educators because of unclear expectations and professional training. The urgent demand for graduating more professional nurses puts pressure to the novice nurse educators (NLN, 2002). Given the aging faculty workforce, the nontraditional student population, and the lack of standardized curriculum, the work of the new nurse educator becomes more demanding. Despite pleas from professional nursing organizations for competency-based curriculum and curriculum innovation in nursing education, little empirical research exists about the competencies of nurse educators in designing curriculum. The purpose of the study was to help nurse educators reach consensus about the competencies in designing curriculum. <b>Method</b>: In a mixed method 3-rounds Delphi study, 37 panelists from 13 of 22 community colleges in Virginia  used a validated instrument to determined the importance of 160-statements divided into two categories of Mindset and Skillset and three roles such as educators, scholar, and collaborator. <b>Results:</b> Participants reached agreement on 27 of 34 competencies (79%). Several major themes emerged from the qualitative and quantitative data analysis and were organized according to categories and nurse educator roles.  For example, participants achieved 75.3% mean agreement that MSN is the first professional education degree needed for a competent designer. <b>Conclusions</b>: Competencies development in curriculum design should be divided into basic and advance education with focus on workshops to assess personal needs for ongoing professional development in curriculum.en_GB
dc.subjectnurse educators.en_GB
dc.subjectCompetencies,en_GB
dc.subjectcurriculum design,en_GB
dc.date.available2013-12-19T17:33:45Z-
dc.date.issued2013-12-19-
dc.date.accessioned2013-12-19T17:33:45Z-
dc.conference.date2013en_GB
dc.conference.name42nd Biennial Conventionen_GB
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursingen_GB
dc.conference.locationIndianapolis, Indiana, USAen_GB
dc.description42nd Biennial Convention 2013 Theme: Give Back to Move Forward. Held at the JW Marriotten_GB
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