The Impact of Nursing Student Self-Directed Learning Readiness on Academic Achievement Related to Active Learning

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/308633
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The Impact of Nursing Student Self-Directed Learning Readiness on Academic Achievement Related to Active Learning
Author(s):
Krouse, Anne Marie
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Eta Beta
Author Details:
Anne Marie Krouse, PhD, MBA, RN-BC, amkrouse@widener.edu
Abstract:

Poster presented on: Monday, November 18, 2013, Tuesday, November 19, 2013

Background: The effectiveness of active learning strategies may be student dependent. Student differences in self-directed learning may contribute to student outcomes in a particular learning environment. As active learning promotes knowledge retention and problem solving, both of which are critical for nursing students, it is essential to understand the influence of an individual’s readiness for self-directed learning on the effectiveness of this learning strategy..

Purpose: The purpose of this study was to examine differences in self-directed learning readiness across class levels in a baccalaureate nursing program. The second purpose was to examine the relationship between student learning outcomes and self-directed learning when active learning strategies are employed in the curriculum.

Methods:  A quantitative descriptive correlational methodology was used to answer the research questions. A sample of undergraduate baccalaureate nursing students  (n=269) participated in the study. The Self-Directed Learning Readiness Scale for Nursing Education was used to assess student perceptions of their self-directed learning readiness.  Student outcome measures included self-reported GPA and performance on HESI specialty exams.

Results: While little to no significance was found in the exploration of the relationship between self-directed learning readiness and student reported GPA and HESI specialty exam results, the students’ ability to apply and synthesize knowledge was lacking as evidenced by their HESI specialty exam scores. This occurred even though student total scores on the Self-Directed Learning questionnaires were all above the mean indicating that they all perceived themselves as being ready for self-directed learning.

Conclusion: Active learning strategies may require a significant capacity for self-directed learning by students particularly if they are being employed outside the classroom. Faculty need to be aware of student differences in self-directed learning readiness in designing student-centered instructional strategies to maximize student learning outcomes.

Keywords:
nursing education; self-directed learning readiness; active learning
Repository Posting Date:
19-Dec-2013
Date of Publication:
19-Dec-2013
Conference Date:
2013
Conference Name:
42nd Biennial Convention
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursing
Conference Location:
Indianapolis, Indiana, USA
Description:
42nd Biennial Convention 2013 Theme: Give Back to Move Forward. Held at the JW Marriott
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_GB
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_GB
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThe Impact of Nursing Student Self-Directed Learning Readiness on Academic Achievement Related to Active Learningen_GB
dc.contributor.authorKrouse, Anne Marieen_GB
dc.contributor.departmentEta Betaen_GB
dc.author.detailsAnne Marie Krouse, PhD, MBA, RN-BC, amkrouse@widener.eduen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/308633-
dc.description.abstract<p>Poster presented on: Monday, November 18, 2013, Tuesday, November 19, 2013</p>Background: The effectiveness of active learning strategies may be student dependent. Student differences in self-directed learning may contribute to student outcomes in a particular learning environment. As active learning promotes knowledge retention and problem solving, both of which are critical for nursing students, it is essential to understand the influence of an individual’s readiness for self-directed learning on the effectiveness of this learning strategy.. <p>Purpose: The purpose of this study was to examine differences in self-directed learning readiness across class levels in a baccalaureate nursing program. The second purpose was to examine the relationship between student learning outcomes and self-directed learning when active learning strategies are employed in the curriculum. <p>Methods:  A quantitative descriptive correlational methodology was used to answer the research questions. A sample of undergraduate baccalaureate nursing students  (n=269) participated in the study. The Self-Directed Learning Readiness Scale for Nursing Education was used to assess student perceptions of their self-directed learning readiness.  Student outcome measures included self-reported GPA and performance on HESI specialty exams. <p>Results: While little to no significance was found in the exploration of the relationship between self-directed learning readiness and student reported GPA and HESI specialty exam results, the students’ ability to apply and synthesize knowledge was lacking as evidenced by their HESI specialty exam scores. This occurred even though student total scores on the Self-Directed Learning questionnaires were all above the mean indicating that they all perceived themselves as being ready for self-directed learning. <p>Conclusion: Active learning strategies may require a significant capacity for self-directed learning by students particularly if they are being employed outside the classroom. Faculty need to be aware of student differences in self-directed learning readiness in designing student-centered instructional strategies to maximize student learning outcomes.en_GB
dc.subjectnursing educationen_GB
dc.subjectself-directed learning readinessen_GB
dc.subjectactive learningen_GB
dc.date.available2013-12-19T17:33:52Z-
dc.date.issued2013-12-19-
dc.date.accessioned2013-12-19T17:33:52Z-
dc.conference.date2013en_GB
dc.conference.name42nd Biennial Conventionen_GB
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursingen_GB
dc.conference.locationIndianapolis, Indiana, USAen_GB
dc.description42nd Biennial Convention 2013 Theme: Give Back to Move Forward. Held at the JW Marriotten_GB
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission.en_GB
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