Evaluation of a school-based suicide prevention program: Were emotionally troubled youth positively impacted?

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/308644
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Evaluation of a school-based suicide prevention program: Were emotionally troubled youth positively impacted?
Author(s):
Strunk, Catherine M.; Ossege, Julianne
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Non-member
Author Details:
Catherine M. Strunk, MSN, BSN, RN, cathy.strunk@roadrunner.com; Julianne Ossege, PhD, CFNP-BC, BSN
Abstract:

Session presented on: Monday, November 18, 2013

The increasing rate of youth suicide in the United States has prompted the implementation of a number of suicide prevention programs in schools across the nation.  Unfortunately, most school-based suicide prevention program evaluations do not show a positive impact on help-seeking behaviors among the particularly vulnerable group of emotional troubled youth despite their being at high risk for completed suicide.  This study is a secondary analysis of the Surviving the Teens® program evaluation to determine its effect on help-seeking behaviors among troubled youth.  Results showed significant increases in mean scores of the Behavioral Intent to Communicate with Important Others Regarding Emotional Health Issues subscale (n = 47) from pre-test to 3-month follow-up.  A significant increase in mean scores of the Behavioral Intent Regarding Help-Seeking Behaviors when Suicidal subscale occurred from pre-test to post-test (n = 63), but not at 3-month follow-up.  A significant increase in mean scores in the item “I would tell an adult if I was suicidal” occurred from pre-test to 3-month follow-up.  These findings suggest that the Surviving the Teens® program has a positive effect on help-seeking behaviors in troubled youth.  It is imperative that nurses, especially school nurses, become informed about school-based suicide prevention programs so they can guide schools in the development, implementation, and/or selection of evidence-based suicide prevention programs.
Keywords:
suicide; prevention; teen
Repository Posting Date:
19-Dec-2013
Date of Publication:
19-Dec-2013
Conference Date:
2013
Conference Name:
42nd Biennial Convention
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursing
Conference Location:
Indianapolis, Indiana, USA
Description:
42nd Biennial Convention 2013 Theme: Give Back to Move Forward. Held at the JW Marriott
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_GB
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_GB
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleEvaluation of a school-based suicide prevention program: Were emotionally troubled youth positively impacted?en_GB
dc.contributor.authorStrunk, Catherine M.en_GB
dc.contributor.authorOssege, Julianneen_GB
dc.contributor.departmentNon-memberen_GB
dc.author.detailsCatherine M. Strunk, MSN, BSN, RN, cathy.strunk@roadrunner.com; Julianne Ossege, PhD, CFNP-BC, BSNen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/308644-
dc.description.abstract<p>Session presented on: Monday, November 18, 2013</p>The increasing rate of youth suicide in the United States has prompted the implementation of a number of suicide prevention programs in schools across the nation.  Unfortunately, most school-based suicide prevention program evaluations do not show a positive impact on help-seeking behaviors among the particularly vulnerable group of emotional troubled youth despite their being at high risk for completed suicide.  This study is a secondary analysis of the <i>Surviving the Teens® </i>program evaluation to determine its effect on help-seeking behaviors among troubled youth.  Results showed significant increases in mean scores of the <i>Behavioral Intent to Communicate with Important Others Regarding Emotional Health Issues</i> subscale (n = 47) from pre-test to 3-month follow-up.  A significant increase in mean scores of the <i>Behavioral Intent Regarding Help-Seeking Behaviors when Suicidal</i> subscale occurred from pre-test to post-test (n = 63), but not at 3-month follow-up.  A significant increase in mean scores in the item “I would tell an adult if I was suicidal” occurred from pre-test to 3-month follow-up.  These findings suggest that the Surviving the Teens® program has a positive effect on help-seeking behaviors in troubled youth.  It is imperative that nurses, especially school nurses, become informed about school-based suicide prevention programs so they can guide schools in the development, implementation, and/or selection of evidence-based suicide prevention programs.en_GB
dc.subjectsuicideen_GB
dc.subjectpreventionen_GB
dc.subjectteenen_GB
dc.date.available2013-12-19T17:34:01Z-
dc.date.issued2013-12-19-
dc.date.accessioned2013-12-19T17:34:01Z-
dc.conference.date2013en_GB
dc.conference.name42nd Biennial Conventionen_GB
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursingen_GB
dc.conference.locationIndianapolis, Indiana, USAen_GB
dc.description42nd Biennial Convention 2013 Theme: Give Back to Move Forward. Held at the JW Marriotten_GB
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission.en_GB
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