Retention of New Graduate Nurses – A Survival Analysis of Five On-Boarding Strategies

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/308646
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Retention of New Graduate Nurses – A Survival Analysis of Five On-Boarding Strategies
Author(s):
Oster, Cynthia A.; Houser, Janet; Siegrist, Mary
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Alpha Kappa
Author Details:
Cynthia A. Oster, PhD, MBA, RN, cynthiaoster@centura.org; Janet Houser, PhD, RN; Mary Siegrist, MS, RHIA
Abstract:

Session presented on: Saturday, November 16, 2013

A 30% turnover rate among graduate nurses in year one of practice may climb to 57% in year two (Halfer, 2011). 

The study purpose was to estimate retention of new graduate nurses experiencing five different on-boarding strategies and determine risk points for loss.  Four year retention of graduates who participated in one of five on-boarding strategies was collected between 2001 and 2012.  Data collected were start dates, termination dates, and program type. Termination time in months was calculated.

Kaplan-Meier analysis was used to model survival for the overall group and each program. Probability of survival and survival curves were generated. The log-rank test determined significant differences in retention by program. Power was calculated to be 0.859 with eta equaling 0.770.

41 graduates oriented through general classes with unit orientation, 13 through the Dedicated Education Unit, 18 through unit orientation only, 46 through graduate classes with unit orientation and 81 through the graduate residency program. Differences in termination rates were statistically different (X2 = 26.70, p < .0001). Residency program survival probability was significantly different (log rank X2 = 42.453, p < .0001). Risk points for termination were 8 and 12 months for the residency program while the four other strategies had multiple risk points.

Longitudinal analysis revealed the residency program significantly improves the survival of new graduate nurses. Identified risk points provide actionable information to plan intensive preventive interventions to prevent loss in the first four years of employment. Comparison of hazard curves for different on-boarding programs can inform administrators about efforts having the greatest impact on retention.

Keywords:
Survival analysis; New graduate
Repository Posting Date:
19-Dec-2013
Date of Publication:
19-Dec-2013
Conference Date:
2013
Conference Name:
42nd Biennial Convention
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursing
Conference Location:
Indianapolis, Indiana, USA
Description:
42nd Biennial Convention 2013 Theme: Give Back to Move Forward. Held at the JW Marriott

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_GB
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_GB
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleRetention of New Graduate Nurses – A Survival Analysis of Five On-Boarding Strategiesen_GB
dc.contributor.authorOster, Cynthia A.en_GB
dc.contributor.authorHouser, Janeten_GB
dc.contributor.authorSiegrist, Maryen_GB
dc.contributor.departmentAlpha Kappaen_GB
dc.author.detailsCynthia A. Oster, PhD, MBA, RN, cynthiaoster@centura.org; Janet Houser, PhD, RN; Mary Siegrist, MS, RHIAen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/308646-
dc.description.abstract<p>Session presented on: Saturday, November 16, 2013</p>A 30% turnover rate among graduate nurses in year one of practice may climb to 57% in year two (Halfer, 2011).  <p>The study purpose was to estimate retention of new graduate nurses experiencing five different on-boarding strategies and determine risk points for loss.  Four year retention of graduates who participated in one of five on-boarding strategies was collected between 2001 and 2012.  Data collected were start dates, termination dates, and program type. Termination time in months was calculated. <p>Kaplan-Meier analysis was used to model survival for the overall group and each program. Probability of survival and survival curves were generated. The log-rank test determined significant differences in retention by program. Power was calculated to be 0.859 with eta equaling 0.770. <p>41 graduates oriented through general classes with unit orientation, 13 through the Dedicated Education Unit, 18 through unit orientation only, 46 through graduate classes with unit orientation and 81 through the graduate residency program. Differences in termination rates were statistically different (X<sup>2</sup> = 26.70, p < .0001). Residency program survival probability was significantly different (log rank X<sup>2</sup> = 42.453, p < .0001). Risk points for termination were 8 and 12 months for the residency program while the four other strategies had multiple risk points. <p><b></b><p>Longitudinal analysis revealed the residency program significantly improves the survival of new graduate nurses. Identified risk points provide actionable information to plan intensive preventive interventions to prevent loss in the first four years of employment. Comparison of hazard curves for different on-boarding programs can inform administrators about efforts having the greatest impact on retention.en_GB
dc.subjectSurvival analysisen_GB
dc.subjectNew graduateen_GB
dc.date.available2013-12-19T17:34:02Z-
dc.date.issued2013-12-19-
dc.date.accessioned2013-12-19T17:34:02Z-
dc.conference.date2013en_GB
dc.conference.name42nd Biennial Conventionen_GB
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursingen_GB
dc.conference.locationIndianapolis, Indiana, USAen_GB
dc.description42nd Biennial Convention 2013 Theme: Give Back to Move Forward. Held at the JW Marriotten_GB
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