2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/308685
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Global and Local Implications of Stress in Charge Nurses
Author(s):
Renker, Paula Rinard; Admi, Hanna
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
N/A
Author Details:
Paula Rinard Renker, Ph.D., RN, prenker2@ohiohealth.com; Hanna Admi, Ph.D., RN
Abstract:

Session presented on: Tuesday, November 19, 2013

While anecdotal evidence supports negative effects of stress in charge nurses, there is no psychometrically-established survey in English to measure the phenomenon.  The purpose of this study was to cross-culturally replicate an Israeli survey developed to measure stress in charge nurses and to compare specific stressors and stress levels between Israeli and US charge nurses.

 This descriptive-correlational study compared results between 263 registered charge nurses from a mid-western US health system with 793 registered nurses from six Israeli hospitals.  The anonymous survey featured 50 stressful scenarios encountered by charge nurses with Lickert response scaling. Survey data from American and Israeli Hospitals were combined for analysis. Factor analyses were conducted to determine the presence of sub-scales.  Scale means as well as scores for the top 10 items were compared within and between each country as well as between hospitals within each country.

American charge  nurses were significantly older, more likely to work full time, be female, and have less experience and lower levels of education than Israeli nurses.  Factor analyses were conducted initially for the sample as a whole and secondarily with the Israeli sample with a confirmatory factor analysis conducted with the American sample. Four factors emerged with Cronbach’s alphas ranging from 0.9-0.78 with less than 0.02 differentiating item means of the two samples. Goodness of Fit indices primarily supported the confirmatory factor analysis. The factors represented patient and family complaints, lack of resources, responsibility and burden, and professional conflict. Stress levels were similar between and among the various hospitals and countries, especially when considering the size of the hospital unit. There were more similarities between large (>400) and smaller (<400) bed hospitals from the US and Israel than between the two samples as a whole.  The findings support the use of the Charge Nurse Stress Questionnaire in US hospitals.

Keywords:
cross-cultural; charge nurse; Stress
Repository Posting Date:
19-Dec-2013
Date of Publication:
19-Dec-2013
Conference Date:
2013
Conference Name:
42nd Biennial Convention
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursing
Conference Location:
Indianapolis, Indiana, USA
Description:
42nd Biennial Convention 2013 Theme: Give Back to Move Forward. Held at the JW Marriott

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_GB
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_GB
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleGlobal and Local Implications of Stress in Charge Nursesen_GB
dc.contributor.authorRenker, Paula Rinarden_GB
dc.contributor.authorAdmi, Hannaen_GB
dc.contributor.departmentN/Aen_GB
dc.author.detailsPaula Rinard Renker, Ph.D., RN, prenker2@ohiohealth.com; Hanna Admi, Ph.D., RNen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/308685-
dc.description.abstract<p>Session presented on: Tuesday, November 19, 2013</p>While anecdotal evidence supports negative effects of stress in charge nurses, there is no psychometrically-established survey in English to measure the phenomenon.  The purpose of this study was to cross-culturally replicate an Israeli survey developed to measure stress in charge nurses and to compare specific stressors and stress levels between Israeli and US charge nurses. <p> This descriptive-correlational study compared results between 263 registered charge nurses from a mid-western US health system with 793 registered nurses from six Israeli hospitals.  The anonymous survey featured 50 stressful scenarios encountered by charge nurses with Lickert response scaling. Survey data from American and Israeli Hospitals were combined for analysis. Factor analyses were conducted to determine the presence of sub-scales.  Scale means as well as scores for the top 10 items were compared within and between each country as well as between hospitals within each country. <p>American charge  nurses were significantly older, more likely to work full time, be female, and have less experience and lower levels of education than Israeli nurses.  Factor analyses were conducted initially for the sample as a whole and secondarily with the Israeli sample with a confirmatory factor analysis conducted with the American sample. Four factors emerged with Cronbach’s alphas ranging from 0.9-0.78 with less than 0.02 differentiating item means of the two samples. Goodness of Fit indices primarily supported the confirmatory factor analysis. The factors represented patient and family complaints, lack of resources, responsibility and burden, and professional conflict. Stress levels were similar between and among the various hospitals and countries, especially when considering the size of the hospital unit. There were more similarities between large (>400) and smaller (<400) bed hospitals from the US and Israel than between the two samples as a whole.  The findings support the use of the Charge Nurse Stress Questionnaire in US hospitals.en_GB
dc.subjectcross-culturalen_GB
dc.subjectcharge nurseen_GB
dc.subjectStressen_GB
dc.date.available2013-12-19T17:34:44Z-
dc.date.issued2013-12-19-
dc.date.accessioned2013-12-19T17:34:44Z-
dc.conference.date2013en_GB
dc.conference.name42nd Biennial Conventionen_GB
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursingen_GB
dc.conference.locationIndianapolis, Indiana, USAen_GB
dc.description42nd Biennial Convention 2013 Theme: Give Back to Move Forward. Held at the JW Marriotten_GB
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