Neurocognitive Correlates of HIV/STI-Associated Sexual Decision-Making in African American Girls

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/308709
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Neurocognitive Correlates of HIV/STI-Associated Sexual Decision-Making in African American Girls
Author(s):
George Dalmida, Safiya
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Alpha Epsilon
Author Details:
Safiya George Dalmida, PhD, APRN-BC, sageorg@emory.edu
Abstract:

Poster presented on: Sunday, November 17, 2013, Saturday, November 16, 2013

Background/Significance/Purpose: African American (AA) girls are disproportionately affected by the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and sexually transmitted infections (STIs). These epidemics among adolescents in the U.S. are inextricably tied to individual, psychosocial and cultural phenomena. However, knowledge gaps persist, especially regarding the role of neurocognitive determinants of adolescent sexual risk behavior (SRB). The purpose of this pilot study is to examine: (1) neurocognitive and psychosocial correlates of SRB and (2) individual variation in associations between emotive/affective and cognitive control components of the social information processing network (SIPN) and individual variation in SRB, among AA girls. Design/Methods/Sample: This study is guided by the Biopsychosocial Model of Risk Taking (BMRT); a combined social neuroscience framework that incorporates biological, psychological, cognitive, environmental and social factors, which influence adolescent risk taking. 32 AA females ages 15-23 years were recruited from community organizations. Data Collection: A battery of computerized neuropsychological tests measured prefrontal cortex/executive function/decision-making, impulse control and emotive-cognitive function to examine the underlying cognitive mechanisms of decision making and correlates of SRB. Participants also completed sociodemographics, psychosocial and SRB-related surveys. Analysis: Bivariate correlations, mixed modeling and hierarchical regression statistics were used. Our results indicate that poor cognitive skills were significantly correlated to risky sexual patterns. Higher SRB is associated with poorer cognition, mainly poorer impulse control & also time to make affective choices. Some AA girls with high reported SRB (compared to low SRB) showed greater cognitive delay aversion during reward-related risk-taking (gambling). On average, AA girls with high SRB made more illogically based decisions and took longer to make decisions. Conclusions/Implications: Nurses should provide tailored HIV/STI prevention education based on important links between executive/affective cognition, impulse control & psychosocial factors and AA girls’ SRB. Findings will facilitate development and testing of future hypothesis-driven, culturally-specific, age-appropriate imaging, longitudinal and intervention studies.
Keywords:
adolescent; neuroscience; HIV/AIDS
Repository Posting Date:
19-Dec-2013
Date of Publication:
19-Dec-2013
Conference Date:
2013
Conference Name:
42nd Biennial Convention
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursing
Conference Location:
Indianapolis, Indiana, USA
Description:
42nd Biennial Convention 2013 Theme: Give Back to Move Forward. Held at the JW Marriott
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_GB
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_GB
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleNeurocognitive Correlates of HIV/STI-Associated Sexual Decision-Making in African American Girlsen_GB
dc.contributor.authorGeorge Dalmida, Safiyaen_GB
dc.contributor.departmentAlpha Epsilonen_GB
dc.author.detailsSafiya George Dalmida, PhD, APRN-BC, sageorg@emory.eduen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/308709-
dc.description.abstract<p>Poster presented on: Sunday, November 17, 2013, Saturday, November 16, 2013</p><b>Background/Significance/Purpose: </b>African American (AA) girls are disproportionately affected by the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and sexually transmitted infections (STIs). These epidemics among adolescents in the U.S. are inextricably tied to individual, psychosocial and cultural phenomena. However, knowledge gaps persist, especially regarding the role of neurocognitive determinants of adolescent sexual risk behavior (SRB). The purpose of this pilot study is to examine: (1) neurocognitive and psychosocial correlates of SRB and (2) individual variation in associations between emotive/affective and cognitive control components of the social information processing network (SIPN) and individual variation in SRB, among AA girls. <b>Design/Methods/Sample: </b>This study is guided by the Biopsychosocial Model of Risk Taking (BMRT); a combined social neuroscience framework that incorporates biological, psychological, cognitive, environmental and social factors, which influence adolescent risk taking. 32 AA females ages 15-23 years were recruited from community organizations.<b> Data Collection</b>: A battery of computerized neuropsychological tests measured prefrontal cortex/executive function/decision-making, impulse control and emotive-cognitive function to examine the underlying cognitive mechanisms of decision making and correlates of SRB. Participants also completed sociodemographics, psychosocial and SRB-related surveys. <b>Analysis: </b>Bivariate correlations, mixed modeling and hierarchical regression statistics were used. Our results indicate that poor cognitive skills were significantly correlated to risky sexual patterns. Higher SRB is associated with poorer cognition, mainly poorer impulse control & also time to make affective choices. Some AA girls with high reported SRB (compared to low SRB) showed greater cognitive delay aversion during reward-related risk-taking (gambling). On average, AA girls with high SRB made more illogically based decisions and took longer to make decisions. <b>Conclusions/</b><b>Implications: </b>Nurses should provide tailored HIV/STI prevention education based on important links between executive/affective cognition, impulse control & psychosocial factors and AA girls’ SRB. Findings will facilitate development and testing of future hypothesis-driven, culturally-specific, age-appropriate imaging, longitudinal and intervention studies.en_GB
dc.subjectadolescenten_GB
dc.subjectneuroscienceen_GB
dc.subjectHIV/AIDSen_GB
dc.date.available2013-12-19T17:35:03Z-
dc.date.issued2013-12-19-
dc.date.accessioned2013-12-19T17:35:03Z-
dc.conference.date2013en_GB
dc.conference.name42nd Biennial Conventionen_GB
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursingen_GB
dc.conference.locationIndianapolis, Indiana, USAen_GB
dc.description42nd Biennial Convention 2013 Theme: Give Back to Move Forward. Held at the JW Marriotten_GB
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission.en_GB
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.