Pre-pregnancy body mass index, depression, and excessive gestational weight gain in black and Hispanic pregnant women

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/308718
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Pre-pregnancy body mass index, depression, and excessive gestational weight gain in black and Hispanic pregnant women
Author(s):
Shieh, Carol; Tomey, Lauren
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Non-member
Author Details:
Carol Shieh, RNC-OB, DNSc, wshieh@iupui.edu; Lauren Tomey, BSN
Abstract:

Session presented on: Sunday, November 17, 2013

Obesity and depression contribute to adverse pregnancy outcomes. One third of pregnant women are obese, 25% are depressed, and 50% gain excessive gestational weight. Ethnic minority women are particularly at risk for obesity, depression, and excessive gestational weight gain (EGWG). Researchers have proposed using pre-pregnancy body mass index (BMI) as a biometric marker for assessing prenatal depression and EGWG. The relationships of pre-pregnancy BMI, depression, and EGWG have yet to be investigated. This study examined the relationships of these three variables in black and Hispanic pregnant women.

Using a cross-sectional design, this study included 34 black and 53 Hispanic adult pregnant women recruited from two community health centers in the Midwest.  Pre-pregnancy BMI was calculated from self-reported weight and height and grouped into under/normal weight (BMI < 25) and overweight/obese (BMI ≥ 25). Edinburgh Prenatal Depression Scale (10 questions, 4-point Likert format) measured depression; scores ≥ 10 were classified as possible depression. EGWG was defined as trimester-specific weight gain exceeding the Institute of Medicine’s recommendation. Student’s t and Chi-Square tests were used for analysis.

65% of women were overweight/obese, 25% were depressed, and 45% had EGWG. Frequencies of depression and EGWG were higher in the second and third trimesters (32% -52%) than in the first trimester (4% -18%). Pre-pregnancy BMI was not associated with depression or EGWG. Prenatal depression was not related to EGWG either. Black women were more likely than Hispanic women to be heavier (p = .0006), taller (p = .000), and have EGWG (58% vs 28%; p = .03).

This study did not find statistical significant relationships among BMI, depression, and EGWG. However, depression and EGWG occur throughout pregnancy and should be assessed in each trimester. Black women are more at risk than Hispanic women for EGWG. Culturally relevant nursing intervention targeting weight gain is needed.

Keywords:
depression; health disparity; Gestational weight gain
Repository Posting Date:
19-Dec-2013
Date of Publication:
19-Dec-2013
Conference Date:
2013
Conference Name:
42nd Biennial Convention
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursing
Conference Location:
Indianapolis, Indiana, USA
Description:
42nd Biennial Convention 2013 Theme: Give Back to Move Forward. Held at the JW Marriott
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_GB
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_GB
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titlePre-pregnancy body mass index, depression, and excessive gestational weight gain in black and Hispanic pregnant womenen_GB
dc.contributor.authorShieh, Carolen_GB
dc.contributor.authorTomey, Laurenen_GB
dc.contributor.departmentNon-memberen_GB
dc.author.detailsCarol Shieh, RNC-OB, DNSc, wshieh@iupui.edu; Lauren Tomey, BSNen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/308718-
dc.description.abstract<p>Session presented on: Sunday, November 17, 2013</p>Obesity and depression contribute to adverse pregnancy outcomes. One third of pregnant women are obese, 25% are depressed, and 50% gain excessive gestational weight. Ethnic minority women are particularly at risk for obesity, depression, and excessive gestational weight gain (EGWG). Researchers have proposed using pre-pregnancy body mass index (BMI) as a biometric marker for assessing prenatal depression and EGWG. The relationships of pre-pregnancy BMI, depression, and EGWG have yet to be investigated. This study examined the relationships of these three variables in black and Hispanic pregnant women. <p>Using a cross-sectional design, this study included 34 black and 53 Hispanic adult pregnant women recruited from two community health centers in the Midwest.  Pre-pregnancy BMI was calculated from self-reported weight and height and grouped into under/normal weight (BMI < 25) and overweight/obese (BMI ≥ 25). Edinburgh Prenatal Depression Scale (10 questions, 4-point Likert format) measured depression; scores ≥ 10 were classified as possible depression. EGWG was defined as trimester-specific weight gain exceeding the Institute of Medicine’s recommendation. Student’s t and Chi-Square tests were used for analysis. <p>65% of women were overweight/obese, 25% were depressed, and 45% had EGWG. Frequencies of depression and EGWG were higher in the second and third trimesters (32% -52%) than in the first trimester (4% -18%). Pre-pregnancy BMI was not associated with depression or EGWG. Prenatal depression was not related to EGWG either. Black women were more likely than Hispanic women to be heavier (p = .0006), taller (p = .000), and have EGWG (58% vs 28%; p = .03). <p>This study did not find statistical significant relationships among BMI, depression, and EGWG. However, depression and EGWG occur throughout pregnancy and should be assessed in each trimester. Black women are more at risk than Hispanic women for EGWG. Culturally relevant nursing intervention targeting weight gain is needed.en_GB
dc.subjectdepressionen_GB
dc.subjecthealth disparityen_GB
dc.subjectGestational weight gainen_GB
dc.date.available2013-12-19T17:35:10Z-
dc.date.issued2013-12-19-
dc.date.accessioned2013-12-19T17:35:10Z-
dc.conference.date2013en_GB
dc.conference.name42nd Biennial Conventionen_GB
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursingen_GB
dc.conference.locationIndianapolis, Indiana, USAen_GB
dc.description42nd Biennial Convention 2013 Theme: Give Back to Move Forward. Held at the JW Marriotten_GB
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission.en_GB
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