Caring for a Global Society: The Impact of Latino-American Health Beliefs and Behaviors on Health Outcomes

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/308794
Category:
Full-text
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Caring for a Global Society: The Impact of Latino-American Health Beliefs and Behaviors on Health Outcomes
Author(s):
George Dalmida, Safiya; Moore, Scott Emory; Sobon Sensor, Constance
Author Details:
Safiya George Dalmida PhD, APRN-BC sageorg@emory.edu; Scott Emory Moore MS, APRN, AGPCNP-BC scottemorymoore@gmail.com; Constance Sobon Sensor MSN, RN, CTN-A connie.sensor@gmail.com
Abstract:

Session presented on: Monday, November 18, 2013

This three-part symposium will provide an overview of migrant Latino/Latina beliefs and practices related to metabolic disorders, birth, and health promotion, in their new environment. The first presentation explores the current status of academic and clinical research regarding Latino Migrant Seasonal Farm Workers, specifically, findings that impact culturally appropriate lifestyle modification, health education, and the nursing management of metabolic disorders. Additionally, this presentation seeks to offer interactive case study examples featuring implementation of culturally appropriate patient education and intervention in this population. The second presentation examines the relationship between acculturation, spiritual/religious and psychosocial factors, and maternal-infant outcomes among sixty-nine Latina mothers in six community clinics with research findings that help explain the Latina birth paradox. The concluding presentation describes the influence of Latino values, beliefs and practices on the health care encounter, and discusses lessons learned from and challenges of conducting qualitative research with Dominican migrants in the New York City area, including use of culturally appropriate interpreters, informed consent, and strategies to recruit participants for the study. Communication etiquette and appropriate planning within the context of a Latino magico-religious belief system is discussed, with examples from case studies and research-based literature.
Keywords:
Migrant health; Acculturation; Health beliefs
Repository Posting Date:
19-Dec-2013
Date of Publication:
19-Dec-2013
Conference Date:
2013
Conference Name:
42nd Biennial Convention
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursing
Conference Location:
Indianapolis, Indiana, USA
Description:
42nd Biennial Convention 2013 Theme: Give Back to Move Forward. Held at the JW Marriott

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_GB
dc.type.categoryFull-texten_GB
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleCaring for a Global Society: The Impact of Latino-American Health Beliefs and Behaviors on Health Outcomesen_GB
dc.contributor.authorGeorge Dalmida, Safiyaen_GB
dc.contributor.authorMoore, Scott Emoryen_GB
dc.contributor.authorSobon Sensor, Constanceen_GB
dc.author.detailsSafiya George Dalmida PhD, APRN-BC sageorg@emory.edu; Scott Emory Moore MS, APRN, AGPCNP-BC scottemorymoore@gmail.com; Constance Sobon Sensor MSN, RN, CTN-A connie.sensor@gmail.comen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/308794-
dc.description.abstract<p>Session presented on: Monday, November 18, 2013</p>This three-part symposium will provide an overview of migrant Latino/Latina beliefs and practices related to metabolic disorders, birth, and health promotion, in their new environment. The first presentation explores the current status of academic and clinical research regarding Latino Migrant Seasonal Farm Workers, specifically, findings that impact culturally appropriate lifestyle modification, health education, and the nursing management of metabolic disorders. Additionally, this presentation seeks to offer interactive case study examples featuring implementation of culturally appropriate patient education and intervention in this population. The second presentation examines the relationship between acculturation, spiritual/religious and psychosocial factors, and maternal-infant outcomes among sixty-nine Latina mothers in six community clinics with research findings that help explain the Latina birth paradox. The concluding presentation describes the influence of Latino values, beliefs and practices on the health care encounter, and discusses lessons learned from and challenges of conducting qualitative research with Dominican migrants in the New York City area, including use of culturally appropriate interpreters, informed consent, and strategies to recruit participants for the study. Communication etiquette and appropriate planning within the context of a Latino magico-religious belief system is discussed, with examples from case studies and research-based literature.en_GB
dc.subjectMigrant healthen_GB
dc.subjectAcculturationen_GB
dc.subjectHealth beliefsen_GB
dc.date.available2013-12-19T17:41:26Z-
dc.date.issued2013-12-19-
dc.date.accessioned2013-12-19T17:41:26Z-
dc.conference.date2013en_GB
dc.conference.name42nd Biennial Conventionen_GB
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursingen_GB
dc.conference.locationIndianapolis, Indiana, USAen_GB
dc.description42nd Biennial Convention 2013 Theme: Give Back to Move Forward. Held at the JW Marriotten_GB
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