Exploring Pneumococcal Vaccine Uptake Barriers among African American Adults

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/314047
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Research Study
Level of Evidence:
Quasi-Experimental Study, Other
Research Approach:
Pilot/Exploratory Study
Title:
Exploring Pneumococcal Vaccine Uptake Barriers among African American Adults
Author(s):
Fry, Carla A.
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Lambda Rho-at-Large
Author Details:
Carla A. Fry PhD, MSN, RN Assistant Professor of Nursing Jacksonville University cfry1@ju.edu
Abstract:

Background: Pneumococcus is the bacteria responsible for three major invasive diseases: pneumonia, bacteremia, and meningitis. These illnesses affect over one million annually making pneumococcal disease the most prevalent and dangerous of all vaccine preventable illnesses. Despite safety and efficacy, pneumococcal vaccine (PPSV23) uptake remains challenging particularly among minority populations. The purpose of this study was to examine variables thought to predict PPSV23 uptake among African American (AA) adults whose age or chronic conditions rendered them PPSV23 eligible. Methods: A substructed version of the Health Belief and Precaution Adoption Process Models served as the theoretical underpinning. A quantitative cross-sectional exploratory design using convenience sampling was utilized to survey AA adults. Bivariate analyses were conducted using chi-square. An empirical model with variables found to be statistically significant was then evaluated using backward stepwise logistic regression. Findings: Despite eligibility, only 95 of 295 (32.2%) reported PPSV23 uptake. Older age, female gender, vaccine awareness, increased knowledge, higher trust scores, perceived susceptibility, and presence of provider recommendation for PPSV23 were significant predictors of vaccine uptake in bivariate analyses. In the regression model, age, awareness, and provider recommendation remained significant with younger participants four times less likely to be vaccinated, those unaware six times less likely, and those without a provider recommendation seven times less likely to be vaccinated. Conclusion: Consistent with existing literature, three dimensions of the HBM (barriers, cues, and susceptibility) were significant predictors of PPSV23 uptake.  Interventions aimed at increasing PPSV23 awareness and bolstering healthcare provider recommendation for vaccination should therefore be considered.

Keywords:
pneumococcal vaccines administration and dosage; health belief model
MeSH:
Pneumococcal Vaccines--administration & dosage; Health Belief Model
Repository Posting Date:
13-Mar-2014
Date of Publication:
13-Mar-2014
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International
Description:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.
Note:
The Sigma Theta Tau International grant application that funded this research, in whole or in part, was completed by the applicant and peer-reviewed prior to the award of the STTI grant. No further peer-review has taken place upon the completion of the STTI grant final report and its appearance in this repository.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.type.categoryAbstracten
dc.typeResearch Studyen
dc.evidence.levelQuasi-Experimental Study, Otheren
dc.research.approachPilot/Exploratory Studyen
dc.titleExploring Pneumococcal Vaccine Uptake Barriers among African American Adultsen_US
dc.contributor.authorFry, Carla A.-
dc.contributor.departmentLambda Rho-at-Largeen
dc.author.detailsCarla A. Fry PhD, MSN, RN Assistant Professor of Nursing Jacksonville University cfry1@ju.eduen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/314047-
dc.description.abstract<p>Background: Pneumococcus is the bacteria responsible for three major invasive diseases: pneumonia, bacteremia, and meningitis. These illnesses affect over one million annually making pneumococcal disease the most prevalent and dangerous of all vaccine preventable illnesses. Despite safety and efficacy, pneumococcal vaccine (PPSV23) uptake remains challenging particularly among minority populations. The purpose of this study was to examine variables thought to predict PPSV23 uptake among African American (AA) adults whose age or chronic conditions rendered them PPSV23 eligible. Methods: A substructed version of the Health Belief and Precaution Adoption Process Models served as the theoretical underpinning. A quantitative cross-sectional exploratory design using convenience sampling was utilized to survey AA adults. Bivariate analyses were conducted using chi-square. An empirical model with variables found to be statistically significant was then evaluated using backward stepwise logistic regression. Findings: Despite eligibility, only 95 of 295 (32.2%) reported PPSV23 uptake. Older age, female gender, vaccine awareness, increased knowledge, higher trust scores, perceived susceptibility, and presence of provider recommendation for PPSV23 were significant predictors of vaccine uptake in bivariate analyses. In the regression model, age, awareness, and provider recommendation remained significant with younger participants four times less likely to be vaccinated, those unaware six times less likely, and those without a provider recommendation seven times less likely to be vaccinated. Conclusion: Consistent with existing literature, three dimensions of the HBM (barriers, cues, and susceptibility) were significant predictors of PPSV23 uptake.  Interventions aimed at increasing PPSV23 awareness and bolstering healthcare provider recommendation for vaccination should therefore be considered.</p>en_GB
dc.subjectpneumococcal vaccines administration and dosageen_GB
dc.subjecthealth belief modelen_GB
dc.subject.meshPneumococcal Vaccines--administration & dosageen
dc.subject.meshHealth Belief Modelen
dc.date.available2014-03-13T13:55:28Z-
dc.date.issued2014-03-13-
dc.date.accessioned2014-03-13T13:55:28Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
dc.descriptionThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.en_GB
dc.description.noteThe Sigma Theta Tau International grant application that funded this research, in whole or in part, was completed by the applicant and peer-reviewed prior to the award of the STTI grant. No further peer-review has taken place upon the completion of the STTI grant final report and its appearance in this repository.en
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.