2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/316478
Category:
Full-text
Type:
DNP Capstone Project
Level of Evidence:
Literature Review
Research Approach:
Quantitative Research
Title:
Influenza Education to Improve Vaccination Rates Among College Students
Author(s):
Vaughn, Shelley
Additional Author Information:
Shelley Vaughn, RN, FNP-C, DNP; email: shelleyavaughn@gmail.com
Advisors:
Gould, Kimberly
Degree:
DNP
Degree Year:
2014
Grantor:
Northern Arizona University
Abstract:

Objective The purpose of this project was to provide influenza vaccine education and improve vaccine uptake among Eastern Arizona College dormitory residents. College students living in dormitories are considered a high-risk population for influenza, and the current vaccination rate for this age group is reported as 41.1% nationally, compared to Healthy People 2020’s goal for influenza vaccination of 80%.

Participants The population comprised 300 Eastern Arizona College dormitory residents aged 18 and older.

Methods During back-to-school week, students participated in an influenza education intervention. At 4 weeks post-intervention, a 10-item follow-up survey was administered electronically to measure the impact of the education intervention, ask about vaccine uptake during the previous influenza season, determine current-year vaccination status, and identify barriers to vaccination. Quantitative data analysis used cross-tabulation and chi-square.

Results Three hundred students were offered the education intervention, and 187 students responded to the post-intervention survey. The results did not show a statistically significant improvement in vaccination over the previous year. Influenza vaccine uptake in the respondents was unknown prior to the survey. Barriers to vaccination included students not thinking the vaccine was necessary and not believing they would get influenza.

Comments This population-based, brief video–based educational intervention did not impact the students’ decisions to receive the influenza vaccination. Further assessment and education are needed to improve vaccination rates and decrease the risk of influenza among this high-risk population.

Keywords:
Influenza; College student education
MeSH:
Influenza, Human; Health Education; Students, College
Note:
This work has been approved through a faculty review process prior to its posting in the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository.
Repository Posting Date:
2014-05-02T21:06:08Z
Date of Publication:
2014-05-02

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.advisorGould, Kimberly-
dc.contributor.authorVaughn, Shelley-
dc.date.accessioned2014-05-02T21:06:08Z-
dc.date.available2014-05-02T21:06:08Z-
dc.date.issued2014-05-02-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/316478-
dc.description.abstract<p><strong>Objective</strong> The purpose of this project was to provide influenza vaccine education and improve vaccine uptake among Eastern Arizona College dormitory residents. College students living in dormitories are considered a high-risk population for influenza, and the current vaccination rate for this age group is reported as 41.1% nationally, compared to Healthy People 2020’s goal for influenza vaccination of 80%.</p> <p><strong>Participants</strong> The population comprised 300 Eastern Arizona College dormitory residents aged 18 and older.</p> <p><strong>Methods</strong> During back-to-school week, students participated in an influenza education intervention. At 4 weeks post-intervention, a 10-item follow-up survey was administered electronically to measure the impact of the education intervention, ask about vaccine uptake during the previous influenza season, determine current-year vaccination status, and identify barriers to vaccination. Quantitative data analysis used cross-tabulation and chi-square.</p> <p><strong>Results</strong> Three hundred students were offered the education intervention, and 187 students responded to the post-intervention survey. The results did not show a statistically significant improvement in vaccination over the previous year. Influenza vaccine uptake in the respondents was unknown prior to the survey. Barriers to vaccination included students not thinking the vaccine was necessary and not believing they would get influenza.</p> <p><strong>Comments</strong> This population-based, brief video–based educational intervention did not impact the students’ decisions to receive the influenza vaccination. Further assessment and education are needed to improve vaccination rates and decrease the risk of influenza among this high-risk population.</p>en_GB
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.subjectInfluenzaen_GB
dc.subjectCollege student educationen_GB
dc.subject.meshInfluenza, Humanen_GB
dc.subject.meshHealth Educationen_GB
dc.subject.meshStudents, Collegeen_GB
dc.titleInfluenza Education to Improve Vaccination Rates Among College Studentsen_US
dc.typeDNP Capstone Projecten
thesis.degree.grantorNorthern Arizona Universityen_GB
thesis.degree.levelDNPen
dc.description.noteThis work has been approved through a faculty review process prior to its posting in the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository.-
dc.primary-author.detailsShelley Vaughn, RN, FNP-C, DNP; email: shelleyavaughn@gmail.comen_GB
thesis.degree.year2014en
dc.type.categoryFull-texten_GB
dc.evidence.levelLiterature Reviewen
dc.research.approachQuantitative Researchen
This item is licensed under a Creative Commons License
Creative Commons
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.