2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/316692
Category:
Full-text
Type:
DNP Capstone Project
Level of Evidence:
Outcomes Research
Research Approach:
Mixed/Multi Method Research
Title:
Baby Doll Therapy in Dementia Patients
Author(s):
Braden, Barbara A.
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Nu Phi
Author Details:
Barbara A. Braden, MS, MSN, FNP, NP-C
Abstract:

Executive Summary

Dementia is a condition exhibited by emotional and physical states such as anxiety, agitation, sleeplessness, inability to care for oneself, wandering, defiant and sometimes violent behavior, and other unsafe actions.  Chemical restraints are often used to control agitated behaviors, but are not always effective and produce untoward effects.  A review of the literature for alternative therapies to chemical restraints indicated that doll therapy has provided purposeful activity that can help dementia residents feel useful.  In most instances they are less agitated, sleep better, relate to others better, and have an over-all positive affect improvement (Baumann, 1990, Higging, 2010, & James, Mackenzie, & Mukaetova-Ladinska, 2006).

The PICOT question for this evidence based project was: In female residents over 65 with moderate to severe dementia (P), how does exposure to baby-doll therapy (I) compared to no baby-doll therapy exposure (C) influence behavior (O) over a one-week period (T)?  The project was implemented using the Rosswurm and Larrabee framework (1999) “A Model for Change to Evidence-Based Practice.  An “Implementation Protocol for Baby Doll Therapy in Dementia Residents” was developed based on the evidence found in the literature.  Those residents who met the criteria, and with caregiver consent, were the participants in this protocol evaluation project. 

The Project was implemented with 16 residents in a dementia care center.  Their participation was garnered through identification by nursing staff using predetermined criteria and upon the resident’s acceptance of the doll offered to them.  Outcomes were measured by the residents’ caretakers on their perceptions of the impact of the dolls in six areas of behavior; activity/liveliness, interaction with staff, interaction with other residents, happiness/contentment, agitation, and amenable to personal care.  The behavioral outcomes were evaluated on a five-point Likert-type scale with 5 being much more change and 1 being much less change.  The Project Lead also evaluated the residents interaction with the doll using an adopted Engagement Observation Rating Tool (Cohen-Mansfieldabc, Marx, Dakheel-Alia, Regier, & Theina, 2010) , both upon introduction of the doll and approximately one-week later.

Participants had a statistically significant increase in the level of happiness with a similar trend for the behaviors of: activity/liveliness, interaction with staff, interaction with others, and ease of giving care.  There was also a trend that indicated there was a reduction in anxiety level.  Case studies provide the response and engagement of the participants to doll therapy.  The evidence based protocol provided guidance on the implementation of doll therapy for those with dementia.  Recommendations based on the outcomes of the project include use with female residents with moderate to severe dementia who have had or cared for young children in their past.  Evaluation of the implementation of doll therapy protocol by staff caregivers and family members was positive and supportive of the findings in the literature.  This cost effective non-pharmacological approach to improving the well-being of residents with dementia is a therapeutic option.  The dementia center staff expressed interest in continuing use of baby doll therapy as an option for their residents.  Introduction of the baby doll to future residents can be accomplished by the following the guidelines established by the Project Lead.

Keywords:
Dementia; Dolls
MeSH:
Dementia--therapy
Repository Posting Date:
9-May-2014
Date of Publication:
9-May-2014
Description:
Conducting any evidence-based project such as this would not be possible without the help and expertise of those involved with the project. In that context I wish to thank my project Chair, Dr. Phyllis Gaspar, whose many hours of editing and critical review were so invaluable, and my committee members Dr. Judy Ribak and Dr. Gladeen Roberts for their critical reviews and recommendations for the project. I wish to thank Ms. Jodi Jamison, the UT Librarian who did searches and advised me on so many items. I also need to thank the nursing director, the staff, the patients, and the family members of the dementia center where I implemented this project! Lastly, I offer my regards and thanks to all of those who supported me in any respect during the completion of the project.
Note:
This work has been approved through a peer-review process prior to its posting in the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.type.categoryFull-texten
dc.typeDNP Capstone Projecten
dc.evidence.levelOutcomes Researchen
dc.research.approachMixed/Multi Method Researchen
dc.titleBaby Doll Therapy in Dementia Patientsen_US
dc.contributor.authorBraden, Barbara A.-
dc.contributor.departmentNu Phien
dc.author.detailsBarbara A. Braden, MS, MSN, FNP, NP-Cen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/316692-
dc.description.abstract<p align="center"><strong>Executive Summary</strong></p> <p>Dementia is a condition exhibited by emotional and physical states such as anxiety, agitation, sleeplessness, inability to care for oneself, wandering, defiant and sometimes violent behavior, and other unsafe actions.  Chemical restraints are often used to control agitated behaviors, but are not always effective and produce untoward effects.  A review of the literature for alternative therapies to chemical restraints indicated that doll therapy has provided purposeful activity that can help dementia residents feel useful.  In most instances they are less agitated, sleep better, relate to others better, and have an over-all positive affect improvement (Baumann, 1990, Higging, 2010, & James, Mackenzie, & Mukaetova-Ladinska, 2006).</p> <p>The PICOT question for this evidence based project was: In female residents over 65 with moderate to severe dementia (P), how does exposure to baby-doll therapy (I) compared to no baby-doll therapy exposure (C) influence behavior (O) over a one-week period (T)?  The project was implemented using the Rosswurm and Larrabee framework (1999) “A Model for Change to Evidence-Based Practice.  An “Implementation Protocol for Baby Doll Therapy in Dementia Residents” was developed based on the evidence found in the literature.  Those residents who met the criteria, and with caregiver consent, were the participants in this protocol evaluation project. </p> <p>The Project was implemented with 16 residents in a dementia care center.  Their participation was garnered through identification by nursing staff using predetermined criteria and upon the resident’s acceptance of the doll offered to them.  Outcomes were measured by the residents’ caretakers on their perceptions of the impact of the dolls in six areas of behavior; activity/liveliness, interaction with staff, interaction with other residents, happiness/contentment, agitation, and amenable to personal care.  The behavioral outcomes were evaluated on a five-point Likert-type scale with 5 being much more change and 1 being much less change.  The Project Lead also evaluated the residents interaction with the doll using an adopted Engagement Observation Rating Tool (Cohen-Mansfieldabc, Marx, Dakheel-Alia, Regier, & Theina, 2010) , both upon introduction of the doll and approximately one-week later.</p> <p>Participants had a statistically significant increase in the level of happiness with a similar trend for the behaviors of: activity/liveliness, interaction with staff, interaction with others, and ease of giving care.  There was also a trend that indicated there was a reduction in anxiety level.  Case studies provide the response and engagement of the participants to doll therapy.  The evidence based protocol provided guidance on the implementation of doll therapy for those with dementia.  Recommendations based on the outcomes of the project include use with female residents with moderate to severe dementia who have had or cared for young children in their past.  Evaluation of the implementation of doll therapy protocol by staff caregivers and family members was positive and supportive of the findings in the literature.  This cost effective non-pharmacological approach to improving the well-being of residents with dementia is a therapeutic option.  The dementia center staff expressed interest in continuing use of baby doll therapy as an option for their residents.  Introduction of the baby doll to future residents can be accomplished by the following the guidelines established by the Project Lead.</p>en_GB
dc.subjectDementiaen_GB
dc.subjectDollsen_GB
dc.subject.meshDementia--therapyen_GB
dc.date.available2014-05-09T17:30:44Z-
dc.date.issued2014-05-09-
dc.date.accessioned2014-05-09T17:30:44Z-
dc.descriptionConducting any evidence-based project such as this would not be possible without the help and expertise of those involved with the project. In that context I wish to thank my project Chair, Dr. Phyllis Gaspar, whose many hours of editing and critical review were so invaluable, and my committee members Dr. Judy Ribak and Dr. Gladeen Roberts for their critical reviews and recommendations for the project. I wish to thank Ms. Jodi Jamison, the UT Librarian who did searches and advised me on so many items. I also need to thank the nursing director, the staff, the patients, and the family members of the dementia center where I implemented this project! Lastly, I offer my regards and thanks to all of those who supported me in any respect during the completion of the project.en_GB
dc.description.noteThis work has been approved through a peer-review process prior to its posting in the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository.-
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