2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/316787
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Increasing Resilience in Nursing Students
Author(s):
Stephens, Teresa Maggard; Gunther, Mary E.
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Gamma Chi
Author Details:
Teresa Maggard Stephens, PhD, MSN, BSN, RN, email: tese@btes.tv; Mary E. Gunther, PhD, MSN, BSN, RN; author belongs to two STTI chapters: Gamma Chi and Epsilon Sigma
Abstract:

Poster presented on: Saturday, April 5, 2014, Friday, April 4, 2014

Background: 

Nursing students face the same developmental challenges as other college students, but also experience unique stressors that contribute to increased risk for negative outcomes. The intimate nature of patient care, the exposure to workplace adversity, death and dying, and the chaotic nature of healthcare can have cumulative negative effects on students’ health and well-being. Increased resilience could prove useful in helping students confidently face challenges and successfully move forward.

Purpose: 

The purpose of this study was to: (1) determine the effectiveness of an educational intervention delivered via Twitter to increase resilience and sense of support, as well as decrease perceived stress, in a sample of adolescent baccalaureate nursing students, and (2) to describe the personal characteristics of this sample of nursing students.

Method/Research Design:

The study was a multisite experimental repeated measures design with a follow-up email survey. Participants were a sample of 70 randomly assigned junior-level baccalaureate nursing students, ages 19-23, at two state supported universities in the southeastern United States.  Both the control and experimental groups completed three measurements (perceived stress, sense of support, and resilience) at three times of measurement. Multilevel modeling was used to examine growth trajectories over time.

Findings: 

Both groups showed a decline in perceived stress, but the control group demonstrated a greater decrease in scores at follow-up. No statistically significant difference was detected between groups in terms of sense of support. The experimental group demonstrated an increase in resilience from pretest to posttest, but declined at follow-up.

Discussion: 

Despite the unexpected findings, results of the email survey indicate the intervention was beneficial to some students. Strengths of the study include the innovative intervention using Twitter, the use of repeated measures, the use of multilevel modeling to analyze longitudinal data, and the first known use of Ahern’s model as a guiding framework.

Keywords:
Twitter; nursing students; resilience
Repository Posting Date:
13-May-2014
Date of Publication:
13-May-2014
Conference Date:
2014
Conference Name:
Nursing Education Research Conference 2014
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursing; National League of Nursing
Conference Location:
Indianapolis, Indiana, USA
Description:
Nursing Education Research Conference 2014 Theme: Nursing Education Research, held in Hyatt Regency Indianapolis
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription.  Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_GB
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_GB
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleIncreasing Resilience in Nursing Studentsen_GB
dc.contributor.authorStephens, Teresa Maggarden_GB
dc.contributor.authorGunther, Mary E.en_GB
dc.contributor.departmentGamma Chien_GB
dc.author.detailsTeresa Maggard Stephens, PhD, MSN, BSN, RN, email: tese@btes.tv; Mary E. Gunther, PhD, MSN, BSN, RN; author belongs to two STTI chapters: Gamma Chi and Epsilon Sigmaen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/316787-
dc.description.abstract<p>Poster presented on: Saturday, April 5, 2014, Friday, April 4, 2014</p><b>Background:  </b><p>Nursing students face the same developmental challenges as other college students, but also experience unique stressors that contribute to increased risk for negative outcomes. The intimate nature of patient care, the exposure to workplace adversity, death and dying, and the chaotic nature of healthcare can have cumulative negative effects on students’ health and well-being. Increased resilience could prove useful in helping students confidently face challenges and successfully move forward. <p><b>Purpose: </b><p><b> </b>The purpose of this study was to: (1) determine the effectiveness of an educational intervention delivered via Twitter to increase resilience and sense of support, as well as decrease perceived stress, in a sample of adolescent baccalaureate nursing students, and (2) to describe the personal characteristics of this sample of nursing students. <p><b>Method/Research Design: </b><p>The study was a multisite experimental repeated measures design with a follow-up email survey. Participants were a sample of 70 randomly assigned junior-level baccalaureate nursing students, ages 19-23, at two state supported universities in the southeastern United States.  Both the control and experimental groups completed three measurements (perceived stress, sense of support, and resilience) at three times of measurement. Multilevel modeling was used to examine growth trajectories over time. <p><b>Findings:  </b><p>Both groups showed a decline in perceived stress, but the control group demonstrated a greater decrease in scores at follow-up. No statistically significant difference was detected between groups in terms of sense of support. The experimental group demonstrated an increase in resilience from pretest to posttest, but declined at follow-up. <p><b>Discussion: </b><p><b> </b>Despite the unexpected findings, results of the email survey indicate the intervention was beneficial to some students. Strengths of the study include the innovative intervention using Twitter, the use of repeated measures, the use of multilevel modeling to analyze longitudinal data, and the first known use of Ahern’s model as a guiding framework.en_GB
dc.subjectTwitteren_GB
dc.subjectnursing studentsen_GB
dc.subjectresilienceen_GB
dc.date.available2014-05-13T16:42:00Z-
dc.date.issued2014-05-13-
dc.date.accessioned2014-05-13T16:42:00Z-
dc.conference.date2014en_GB
dc.conference.nameNursing Education Research Conference 2014en_GB
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursingen_GB
dc.conference.hostNational League of Nursingen_GB
dc.conference.locationIndianapolis, Indiana, USAen_GB
dc.descriptionNursing Education Research Conference 2014 Theme: Nursing Education Research, held in Hyatt Regency Indianapolisen_GB
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription.  Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.en_GB
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