Implementation of a Faculty Education Program as Preparation for Simulation Facilitation

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/316791
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Implementation of a Faculty Education Program as Preparation for Simulation Facilitation
Author(s):
Pittman, Oralea; Schubert, Carolyn
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Epsilon
Author Details:
Oralea Pittman, DNP, email: pittman.54@osu.edu; Carolyn Schubert, MSN, RN
Abstract:

Poster presented on: Friday, April 4, 2014, Saturday, April 5, 2014

Implementation of a Faculty Education Program as Preparation for Simulation Facilitation

Simulation is a widely used teaching strategy in nursing education.  Studies show that well-constructed and well-facilitated simulations bring about improvements in skills, knowledge, critical thinking abilities, and confidence in nursing students (Cant and Cooper, 2009).  Evidence suggests a link between the effectiveness of simulations for student learning and the experience and knowledge of the faculty conducting them (Alinier, et al, 2006).  A skilled facilitator creates a dynamic process where the learner’s responses assist the teacher in optimizing teaching strategies during the simulation. 

A survey in 2008 revealed that 73% of nursing faculty had no preparation in facilitating simulation and a majority of faculty perceived a need for formal training (Akhtar-Danesh et al., 2009; Dowie and Phillips, 2011; Nguyen et al, 2011).  This gap in preparation is a barrier to effective teaching and learning and may impede the students’ potential growth and development from the simulation experience.

At our university, simulations are part of numerous nursing courses, yet neither experienced nor novice faculty have received any formal preparation in simulation facilitation.  In 2013, based on the Standards of Best Practice: Simulation from AACN and INACSL (INACSL Board of Directors, 2011), a formal education session on simulation was developed for faculty.  The program was evaluated by surveying faculty regarding their readiness and attitudes regarding simulation using the Dowie and Phillips (2011) Faculty Questionnaire. Faculty responses before and after the education session were paired to assess changes brought about by the education session.  Students were also surveyed before and after their faculty attended the education session using the METI Simulation Effectiveness Tool to assess if there were changes in their perception of learning from simulation.

Keywords:
faculty education; simulation
Repository Posting Date:
13-May-2014
Date of Publication:
13-May-2014
Conference Date:
2014
Conference Name:
Nursing Education Research Conference 2014
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursing; National League of Nursing
Conference Location:
Indianapolis, Indiana, USA
Description:
Nursing Education Research Conference 2014 Theme: Nursing Education Research, held in Hyatt Regency Indianapolis
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription.  Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_GB
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_GB
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleImplementation of a Faculty Education Program as Preparation for Simulation Facilitationen_GB
dc.contributor.authorPittman, Oraleaen_GB
dc.contributor.authorSchubert, Carolynen_GB
dc.contributor.departmentEpsilonen_GB
dc.author.detailsOralea Pittman, DNP, email: pittman.54@osu.edu; Carolyn Schubert, MSN, RNen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/316791-
dc.description.abstract<p>Poster presented on: Friday, April 4, 2014, Saturday, April 5, 2014</p>Implementation of a Faculty Education Program as Preparation for Simulation Facilitation <p>Simulation is a widely used teaching strategy in nursing education.  Studies show that well-constructed and well-facilitated simulations bring about improvements in skills, knowledge, critical thinking abilities, and confidence in nursing students (Cant and Cooper, 2009).  Evidence suggests a link between the effectiveness of simulations for student learning and the experience and knowledge of the faculty conducting them (Alinier, et al, 2006).  A skilled facilitator creates a dynamic process where the learner’s responses assist the teacher in optimizing teaching strategies during the simulation.  <p>A survey in 2008 revealed that 73% of nursing faculty had no preparation in facilitating simulation and a majority of faculty perceived a need for formal training (Akhtar-Danesh et al., 2009; Dowie and Phillips, 2011; Nguyen et al, 2011).  This gap in preparation is a barrier to effective teaching and learning and may impede the students’ potential growth and development from the simulation experience. <p>At our university, simulations are part of numerous nursing courses, yet neither experienced nor novice faculty have received any formal preparation in simulation facilitation.  In 2013, based on the Standards of Best Practice: Simulation from AACN and INACSL (INACSL Board of Directors, 2011), a formal education session on simulation was developed for faculty.  The program was evaluated by surveying faculty regarding their readiness and attitudes regarding simulation using the Dowie and Phillips (2011) Faculty Questionnaire. Faculty responses before and after the education session were paired to assess changes brought about by the education session.  Students were also surveyed before and after their faculty attended the education session using the METI Simulation Effectiveness Tool to assess if there were changes in their perception of learning from simulation.en_GB
dc.subjectfaculty educationen_GB
dc.subjectsimulationen_GB
dc.date.available2014-05-13T16:42:26Z-
dc.date.issued2014-05-13-
dc.date.accessioned2014-05-13T16:42:26Z-
dc.conference.date2014en_GB
dc.conference.nameNursing Education Research Conference 2014en_GB
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursingen_GB
dc.conference.hostNational League of Nursingen_GB
dc.conference.locationIndianapolis, Indiana, USAen_GB
dc.descriptionNursing Education Research Conference 2014 Theme: Nursing Education Research, held in Hyatt Regency Indianapolisen_GB
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription.  Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published articleen_GB
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