My Patient Died: A National Study of Nursing Students' Perceptions after Experiencing a Patient Death

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/316797
Category:
Full-text
Format:
Text-based Document
Type:
Presentation
Title:
My Patient Died: A National Study of Nursing Students' Perceptions after Experiencing a Patient Death
Other Titles:
End-of-Life
Author(s):
Heise, Barbara A.; Beckstrand, Renea; Wing, Debra
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Iota Iota-at-Large
Author Details:
Barbara A. Heise, PhD, APRN, BC, CNE; Renea Beckstrand, PhD, RN, CCRN, CNE; Debra Wing, MSN, RN;
Abstract:
Session presented on: Friday, April 4, 2014: Death is an emotionally charged and high stress situation for everyone. The majority of nurses will experience the death of a patient. Nursing students also encounter death and dying while in their clinical settings. Debriefing after high fidelity simulations of patient demise occurs routinely and are efficacious. Yet, pilot study data (N=33) revealed that in real-life clinical settings nursing students often do not receive debriefing despite students classifying the experience as traumatic. The purpose of this national study was to determine the following: 1) the prevalence of a patient death during a student's nursing education; 2) nursing student's perceptions of their first death; 3) nursing student's perceptions of their preparation to handle the death of a patient; and 4) how might nurse educators support the student through this experience. Methods: The design is a descriptive mixed methods study. Undergraduate nursing students who are members of the National Student Nurse Association (NSNA) (55,000 members) were recruited via email. Results: Of the 2794 (5%) nursing students who replied to the survey, 41% had experienced a patient death while a nursing student. Many expressed distress during and following the experience as well as a sense of feeling unprepared in communicating with and caring for the dying patient and the patient's family. Of those who had experienced a death, 66% reported that they did not receive any debriefing. Implications: Most nursing students do not feel prepared to work with dying patients and their families. The majority of nursing students who have experienced a patient death do not receive debriefing. Conclusions: It is essential that students receive adequate support and debriefing following the death of their patient. Nurse educators, particularly clinical instructors, need to routinely include debriefing strategies and may need education on how to debrief students following the death of a patient.
Keywords:
Debriefing; Nursing Education; Death & Dying
Repository Posting Date:
13-May-2014
Date of Publication:
13-May-2014
Other Identifiers:
NERC14C01
Conference Date:
2014
Conference Name:
Nursing Education Research Conference 2014
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursing; National League of Nursing
Conference Location:
Indianapolis, Indiana, USA
Description:
Nursing Education Research Conference 2014 Theme: Nursing Education Research, held in Hyatt Regency Indianapolis

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.type.categoryFull-texten
dc.formatText-based Documenten
dc.typePresentationen
dc.titleMy Patient Died: A National Study of Nursing Students' Perceptions after Experiencing a Patient Deathen
dc.title.alternativeEnd-of-Lifeen
dc.contributor.authorHeise, Barbara A.en
dc.contributor.authorBeckstrand, Reneaen
dc.contributor.authorWing, Debraen
dc.contributor.departmentIota Iota-at-Largeen
dc.author.detailsBarbara A. Heise, PhD, APRN, BC, CNE; Renea Beckstrand, PhD, RN, CCRN, CNE; Debra Wing, MSN, RN;en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/316797-
dc.description.abstractSession presented on: Friday, April 4, 2014: Death is an emotionally charged and high stress situation for everyone. The majority of nurses will experience the death of a patient. Nursing students also encounter death and dying while in their clinical settings. Debriefing after high fidelity simulations of patient demise occurs routinely and are efficacious. Yet, pilot study data (N=33) revealed that in real-life clinical settings nursing students often do not receive debriefing despite students classifying the experience as traumatic. The purpose of this national study was to determine the following: 1) the prevalence of a patient death during a student's nursing education; 2) nursing student's perceptions of their first death; 3) nursing student's perceptions of their preparation to handle the death of a patient; and 4) how might nurse educators support the student through this experience. Methods: The design is a descriptive mixed methods study. Undergraduate nursing students who are members of the National Student Nurse Association (NSNA) (55,000 members) were recruited via email. Results: Of the 2794 (5%) nursing students who replied to the survey, 41% had experienced a patient death while a nursing student. Many expressed distress during and following the experience as well as a sense of feeling unprepared in communicating with and caring for the dying patient and the patient's family. Of those who had experienced a death, 66% reported that they did not receive any debriefing. Implications: Most nursing students do not feel prepared to work with dying patients and their families. The majority of nursing students who have experienced a patient death do not receive debriefing. Conclusions: It is essential that students receive adequate support and debriefing following the death of their patient. Nurse educators, particularly clinical instructors, need to routinely include debriefing strategies and may need education on how to debrief students following the death of a patient.en
dc.subjectDebriefingen
dc.subjectNursing Educationen
dc.subjectDeath & Dyingen
dc.date.available2014-05-13T16:42:38Z-
dc.date.issued2014-05-13en
dc.date.accessioned2014-05-13T16:42:38Z-
dc.conference.date2014en
dc.conference.nameNursing Education Research Conference 2014en
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursingen
dc.conference.hostNational League of Nursingen
dc.conference.locationIndianapolis, Indiana, USAen
dc.descriptionNursing Education Research Conference 2014 Theme: Nursing Education Research, held in Hyatt Regency Indianapolisen
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