Changing Nursing Students' Attitudes Towards the Intellectually and Developmentally Disabled Patient Population: A Review of the Literature and Implications for Nursing

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/316798
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Changing Nursing Students' Attitudes Towards the Intellectually and Developmentally Disabled Patient Population: A Review of the Literature and Implications for Nursing
Author(s):
Smith, Edith C.
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Upsilon Upsilon
Author Details:
Edith C. Smith, MSN, RN, email: epsaub@yahoo.com
Abstract:

Poster presented on: Saturday, April 5, 2014, Friday, April 4, 2014

Background

      In 2006, the CDC identified that 9 out of every 1000 8-year-old children had mental retardation.  In 2007, the CDC identified 7 to 8 million Americans, 3% of general population, as having an intellectual disability.  People with intellectual and developmental disabilities (ID/DD) are at risk for increased health problems.  In 2012, 80% of people with ID/DD utilize Medicaid for primary insurance.

     Communication difficulties, developmental and behavioral issues, and poor attitudes between ID/DD patients and providers can lead to poorly managed care. Research indicates that nurses and physicians experience a lack of knowledge regarding the ID/DD patient, causing them to be uncomfortable in treating the ID/DD patient and possibly hinder care.

Purpose

     Purpose of this literature review is to examine nurses’ attitudes and comfort levels towards the ID/DD patient; its impact on quality of healthcare given, and to increase the knowledge base regarding nurses’ attitudes and the ID/DD patient population.

Literature Review Findings

      Literature review findings indicate that nurses feel they’ve had a lack of knowledge and exposure regarding the ID/DD patient.  Communication barriers can affect the quality and deliverance of nursing care. Literature was acquired through the database of EbscoHost, Cinahl, Lippincott Nursing Center, and PubMed using the keywords intellectual disability, developmental disability, mental retardation, nurse advocacy, nurse attitudes, and healthcare access.

Proposed Research

     A pre-test/post-test quasi-experimental design, using the Attitudes towards Disabled Persons scale (Yuker et al., 1960, 1986) to determine if nursing students’ attitudes change after exposure to the ID/DD patient population in the clinical setting.

Nursing Implications

     Information gained by research and evidence based practice will enable the RN to gain insight and increased comfort levels with the ID/DD patient.  This improved understanding of the ID/DD patient will allow the nurse to provide quality medical care and promote positive outcomes.

Keywords:
attitudes; nurses; disabilities
Repository Posting Date:
13-May-2014
Date of Publication:
13-May-2014
Conference Date:
2014
Conference Name:
Nursing Education Research Conference 2014
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursing; National League of Nursing
Conference Location:
Indianapolis, Indiana, USA
Description:
Nursing Education Research Conference 2014 Theme: Nursing Education Research, held in Hyatt Regency Indianapolis
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription.  Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_GB
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_GB
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleChanging Nursing Students' Attitudes Towards the Intellectually and Developmentally Disabled Patient Population: A Review of the Literature and Implications for Nursingen_GB
dc.contributor.authorSmith, Edith C.en_GB
dc.contributor.departmentUpsilon Upsilonen_GB
dc.author.detailsEdith C. Smith, MSN, RN, email: epsaub@yahoo.comen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/316798-
dc.description.abstract<p>Poster presented on: Saturday, April 5, 2014, Friday, April 4, 2014</p><b>Background</b><p><b>      </b>In 2006, the CDC identified that 9 out of every 1000 8-year-old children had mental retardation.  In 2007, the CDC identified 7 to 8 million Americans, 3% of general population, as having an intellectual disability.  People with intellectual and developmental disabilities (ID/DD) are at risk for increased health problems.  In 2012, 80% of people with ID/DD utilize Medicaid for primary insurance. <p>     Communication difficulties, developmental and behavioral issues, and poor attitudes between ID/DD patients and providers can lead to poorly managed care. Research indicates that nurses and physicians experience a lack of knowledge regarding the ID/DD patient, causing them to be uncomfortable in treating the ID/DD patient and possibly hinder care. <p><b>Purpose</b><p>     Purpose of this literature review is to examine nurses’ attitudes and comfort levels towards the ID/DD patient; its impact on quality of healthcare given, and to increase the knowledge base regarding nurses’ attitudes and the ID/DD patient population. <p><b>Literature Review Findings</b><p>      Literature review findings indicate that nurses feel they’ve had a lack of knowledge and exposure regarding the ID/DD patient.  Communication barriers can affect the quality and deliverance of nursing care. Literature was acquired through the database of EbscoHost, Cinahl, Lippincott Nursing Center, and PubMed using the keywords intellectual disability, developmental disability, mental retardation, nurse advocacy, nurse attitudes, and healthcare access. <p><b>Proposed Research</b><p><b>     </b>A pre-test/post-test quasi-experimental design, using the Attitudes towards Disabled Persons scale (Yuker et al., 1960, 1986) to determine if nursing students’ attitudes change after exposure to the ID/DD patient population in the clinical setting. <p><b>Nursing Implications</b><p><b>     </b>Information gained by research and evidence based practice will enable the RN to gain insight and increased comfort levels with the ID/DD patient.  This improved understanding of the ID/DD patient will allow the nurse to provide quality medical care and promote positive outcomes.en_GB
dc.subjectattitudesen_GB
dc.subjectnursesen_GB
dc.subjectdisabilitiesen_GB
dc.date.available2014-05-13T16:42:39Z-
dc.date.issued2014-05-13-
dc.date.accessioned2014-05-13T16:42:39Z-
dc.conference.date2014en_GB
dc.conference.nameNursing Education Research Conference 2014en_GB
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursingen_GB
dc.conference.hostNational League of Nursingen_GB
dc.conference.locationIndianapolis, Indiana, USAen_GB
dc.descriptionNursing Education Research Conference 2014 Theme: Nursing Education Research, held in Hyatt Regency Indianapolisen_GB
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription.  Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published articleen_GB
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