The Effect of Clinical Nursing Instructors on Student Self-Efficacy

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/316807
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The Effect of Clinical Nursing Instructors on Student Self-Efficacy
Author(s):
Rowbotham, Melodie
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Epsilon Eta
Author Details:
Melodie Rowbotham, PhD, RN, CNE, email: mrowbot@siue.edu
Abstract:

Session presented on: Saturday, April 5, 2014

For nursing students, clinical practicum experiences provide an opportunity to apply concepts learned in class; practice skills learned in lab; and interact with patients, families, and other nurses.  Although students look forward to these experiences, they often feel intimated and anxious about their abilities.  Clinical instructors play an important role in a student’s experience and can either help or hinder student learning and self-efficacy.  Using Bandura’s Social Learning Theory as a foundation, this study examined the relationship between perceived instructor effectiveness and student self-efficacy.  The instruments used were the Nursing Clinical Teacher Effectiveness Inventory (NCTEI) and the Student Self-Efficacy (SSE) questionnaire.  Participants (n= 236) were juniors and seniors from a traditional nursing program with 86% female and 14% male. Data were analyzed using Pearson’s correlation and MANCOVA. Results indicated that four specific teacher characteristics significantly impacted student self-efficacy (p<.05). On these four NCTEI characteristics, high faculty scores showed a direct correlation to high student scores on the SSE; conversely, low scores on the NCTEI were directly correlated to low scores on the SSE.  These four attributes (along with select examples) are: 1) Teaching Ability (explains clearly, encourages active participation, able to elicit underlying reasoning), 2) Interpersonal Relationship (provides support, listens, shows personal interest), 3) Nursing Competence (demonstrates clinical skill and judgment, good communication skills, well read in area of teaching), and 4) Evaluation (suggests ways to improve, gives frequent feedback, corrects without belittling).  As nursing faculty recognize the characteristics of effective clinical teaching, and integrate them into their teaching, student self-efficacy can be increased and student learning enhanced.

Keywords:
teacher effectiveness; effective clinical teaching; student self-efficacy
Repository Posting Date:
13-May-2014
Date of Publication:
13-May-2014
Conference Date:
2014
Conference Name:
Nursing Education Research Conference 2014
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursing; National League of Nursing
Conference Location:
Indianapolis, Indiana, USA
Description:
Nursing Education Research Conference 2014 Theme: Nursing Education Research, held in Hyatt Regency Indianapolis

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_GB
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_GB
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThe Effect of Clinical Nursing Instructors on Student Self-Efficacyen_GB
dc.contributor.authorRowbotham, Melodieen_GB
dc.contributor.departmentEpsilon Etaen_GB
dc.author.detailsMelodie Rowbotham, PhD, RN, CNE, email: mrowbot@siue.eduen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/316807-
dc.description.abstract<p>Session presented on: Saturday, April 5, 2014</p><p>For nursing students, clinical practicum experiences provide an opportunity to apply concepts learned in class; practice skills learned in lab; and interact with patients, families, and other nurses.<span>  Although students look forward to these experiences, they often feel intimated and anxious about their abilities.  Clinical instructors play an important role in a student’s experience and can either help or hinder student learning and self-efficacy.  Using Bandura’s Social Learning Theory as a foundation, this study examined the relationship between perceived instructor effectiveness and student self-efficacy.  The instruments used were the <i>Nursing Clinical Teacher Effectiveness Inventory (NCTEI)</i> and the <i>Student Self-Efficacy (SSE)</i> questionnaire.  Participants (n= 236) were juniors and seniors from a traditional nursing program with 86% female and 14% male. Data were analyzed using Pearson’s correlation and MANCOVA. Results indicated that four specific teacher characteristics significantly impacted student self-efficacy (p<.05). On these four NCTEI characteristics, high faculty scores showed a direct correlation to high student scores on the SSE; conversely, low scores on the NCTEI were directly correlated to low scores on the SSE.<span>  These four attributes (along with select examples) are: 1) Teaching Ability (explains clearly, encourages active participation, able to elicit underlying reasoning), 2) Interpersonal Relationship (provides support, listens, shows personal interest), 3) Nursing Competence (demonstrates clinical skill and judgment, good communication skills, well read in area of teaching), and 4) Evaluation<b> </b>(su</span>ggests ways to improve, gives frequent feedback, corrects without belittling). <span> </span>As nursing faculty recognize the characteristics of effective clinical teaching, and integrate them into their teaching, student self-efficacy can be increased and student learning enhanced.</span>en_GB
dc.subjectteacher effectivenessen_GB
dc.subjecteffective clinical teachingen_GB
dc.subjectstudent self-efficacyen_GB
dc.date.available2014-05-13T16:42:54Z-
dc.date.issued2014-05-13-
dc.date.accessioned2014-05-13T16:42:54Z-
dc.conference.date2014en_GB
dc.conference.nameNursing Education Research Conference 2014en_GB
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursingen_GB
dc.conference.hostNational League of Nursingen_GB
dc.conference.locationIndianapolis, Indiana, USAen_GB
dc.descriptionNursing Education Research Conference 2014 Theme: Nursing Education Research, held in Hyatt Regency Indianapolisen_GB
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