Nursing Faculty Professional Development: A Study Using the National League for Nursing (NLN) Core Competencies for Nurse Educators for Development of Novice to Expert Nurse Educators

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/316815
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Nursing Faculty Professional Development: A Study Using the National League for Nursing (NLN) Core Competencies for Nurse Educators for Development of Novice to Expert Nurse Educators
Author(s):
Luoma, Kari Leigh
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Non-member
Author Details:
Kari Leigh Luoma, PhD, MSN, RN, email: kluoma@davenport.edu
Abstract:

Poster presented on: Friday, April 4, 2014, Saturday, April 5, 2014

Identifying the NLN Core Competencies for Nurse Educators and task statements that are most significant for nursing faculty as they transition from the clinical setting to the academic environment is crucial to the success of the nursing educator. A quantitative descriptive comparative design was used to identify the NLN Core Competencies for Nurse Educators and task statements that should be included at the novice to expert stage of professional development. The NLN Core Competencies for Nurse Educators has eight competencies and includes 66 task statements. An online survey was designed by the researcher, reviewed by expert nurse educators, and pilot tested with nurse educators and nursing program administrators. The online survey was then distributed to nursing program administrators and nursing instructors at nursing programs in one Midwestern state where IRB approval was obtained.  Respondents were asked to rate the NLN Core Competencies for Nurse Educators task statements where nursing faculty should demonstrate minimal competency from the novice to expert professional development level developed for the study. The findings identified from the study can be used to develop a formal professional development plan to facilitate the successful transition from the clinical environment to the nurse educator role. There were 49 task statements that nursing program administrators and nursing instructors rated similarly with respect to the level at which each should be demonstrated.  There were 12 task statements that were rated with two or more professional development levels between the nursing program administrators and nursing instructors. Statistically significant differences between nursing program administrators’ and nursing instructors’ ratings were found for 19 task statements. The study’s findings provide the foundation for further research to design a systematic professional development plan to support future nursing faculty.
Keywords:
Nursing Faculty Professional Development; Benner's Novice to Expert; NLN Core Competencies for Nurse Educators
Repository Posting Date:
13-May-2014
Date of Publication:
13-May-2014
Conference Date:
2014
Conference Name:
Nursing Education Research Conference 2014
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursing; National League of Nursing
Conference Location:
Indianapolis, Indiana, USA
Description:
Nursing Education Research Conference 2014 Theme: Nursing Education Research, held in Hyatt Regency Indianapolis
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription.  Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_GB
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_GB
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleNursing Faculty Professional Development: A Study Using the National League for Nursing (NLN) Core Competencies for Nurse Educators for Development of Novice to Expert Nurse Educatorsen_GB
dc.contributor.authorLuoma, Kari Leighen_GB
dc.contributor.departmentNon-memberen_GB
dc.author.detailsKari Leigh Luoma, PhD, MSN, RN, email: kluoma@davenport.eduen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/316815-
dc.description.abstract<p>Poster presented on: Friday, April 4, 2014, Saturday, April 5, 2014</p>Identifying the NLN Core Competencies for Nurse Educators and task statements that are most significant for nursing faculty as they transition from the clinical setting to the academic environment is crucial to the success of the nursing educator. A quantitative descriptive comparative design was used to identify the NLN Core Competencies for Nurse Educators and task statements that should be included at the novice to expert stage of professional development. The NLN Core Competencies for Nurse Educators has eight competencies and includes 66 task statements. An online survey was designed by the researcher, reviewed by expert nurse educators, and pilot tested with nurse educators and nursing program administrators. The online survey was then distributed to nursing program administrators and nursing instructors at nursing programs in one Midwestern state where IRB approval was obtained.  Respondents were asked to rate the NLN Core Competencies for Nurse Educators task statements where nursing faculty should demonstrate minimal competency from the novice to expert professional development level developed for the study. The findings identified from the study can be used to develop a formal professional development plan to facilitate the successful transition from the clinical environment to the nurse educator role. There were 49 task statements that nursing program administrators and nursing instructors rated similarly with respect to the level at which each should be demonstrated.  There were 12 task statements that were rated with two or more professional development levels between the nursing program administrators and nursing instructors. Statistically significant differences between nursing program administrators’ and nursing instructors’ ratings were found for 19 task statements. The study’s findings provide the foundation for further research to design a systematic professional development plan to support future nursing faculty.en_GB
dc.subjectNursing Faculty Professional Developmenten_GB
dc.subjectBenner's Novice to Experten_GB
dc.subjectNLN Core Competencies for Nurse Educatorsen_GB
dc.date.available2014-05-13T16:43:06Z-
dc.date.issued2014-05-13-
dc.date.accessioned2014-05-13T16:43:06Z-
dc.conference.date2014en_GB
dc.conference.nameNursing Education Research Conference 2014en_GB
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursingen_GB
dc.conference.hostNational League of Nursingen_GB
dc.conference.locationIndianapolis, Indiana, USAen_GB
dc.descriptionNursing Education Research Conference 2014 Theme: Nursing Education Research, held in Hyatt Regency Indianapolisen_GB
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription.  Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published articleen_GB
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