Online Degrees: A Strategy for Increasing Diversity in Nursing Faculty

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/316817
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Online Degrees: A Strategy for Increasing Diversity in Nursing Faculty
Author(s):
Post, Jerri L.
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Non-member
Author Details:
Jerri L. Post, PhD, RN, email: jerri.post@yahoo.com
Abstract:

Poster presented on: Saturday, April 5, 2014, Friday, April 4, 2014

The problem explored in this study focused on the attitudes of nurse educators toward online degrees in relation to hiring practices. With the proliferation of online courses and degrees, research has shown that the acceptability of online degrees has become a concern for graduates of online programs seeking jobs and for potential employers. A quantitative study was conducted by surveying a sample of nurse educators who were active participants in the hiring process. This study was narrowed to include only nurse educators serving on hiring committees, working in baccalaureate or graduate degree programs, and teaching in Texas. The most typical type of participant was a female between the ages of 55 and 64 years who had been in the nursing profession for 21 or more years with 1 to 5 years in their current positions as nurse educators. The study was guided by four research questions (RQs) that inquired about the nurse educators’ general perceptions of hiring practices, their perceptions of a traditional versus an online nursing education, their perceptions of the accreditation status of their educational institutions, and whether the nurse educator shortage affects their hiring decisions. An online survey was sent via SurveyMonkey to nurse educators in the state of Texas inviting them to participate in this study. Results of the study indicate that nurse educators with an online academic credential had more positive perceptions of online degrees than nurse educators without an online credential, increases in the perceived value of accreditation of online education institutions were correlated with an increased perceived value of an online academic credential, and the nursing shortage was associated with the hiring of online applicants.
Keywords:
hiring; faculty; online
Repository Posting Date:
13-May-2014
Date of Publication:
13-May-2014
Conference Date:
2014
Conference Name:
Nursing Education Research Conference 2014
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursing; National League of Nursing
Conference Location:
Indianapolis, Indiana, USA
Description:
Nursing Education Research Conference 2014 Theme: Nursing Education Research, held in Hyatt Regency Indianapolis
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription.  Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_GB
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_GB
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleOnline Degrees: A Strategy for Increasing Diversity in Nursing Facultyen_GB
dc.contributor.authorPost, Jerri L.en_GB
dc.contributor.departmentNon-memberen_GB
dc.author.detailsJerri L. Post, PhD, RN, email: jerri.post@yahoo.comen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/316817-
dc.description.abstract<p>Poster presented on: Saturday, April 5, 2014, Friday, April 4, 2014</p>The problem explored in this study focused on the attitudes of nurse educators toward online degrees in relation to hiring practices. With the proliferation of online courses and degrees, research has shown that the acceptability of online degrees has become a concern for graduates of online programs seeking jobs and for potential employers. A quantitative study was conducted by surveying a sample of nurse educators who were active participants in the hiring process. This study was narrowed to include only nurse educators serving on hiring committees, working in baccalaureate or graduate degree programs, and teaching in Texas. The most typical type of participant was a female between the ages of 55 and 64 years who had been in the nursing profession for 21 or more years with 1 to 5 years in their current positions as nurse educators. The study was guided by four research questions (RQs) that inquired about the nurse educators’ general perceptions of hiring practices, their perceptions of a traditional versus an online nursing education, their perceptions of the accreditation status of their educational institutions, and whether the nurse educator shortage affects their hiring decisions. An online survey was sent via SurveyMonkey to nurse educators in the state of Texas inviting them to participate in this study. Results of the study indicate that nurse educators with an online academic credential had more positive perceptions of online degrees than nurse educators without an online credential, increases in the perceived value of accreditation of online education institutions were correlated with an increased perceived value of an online academic credential, and the nursing shortage was associated with the hiring of online applicants.en_GB
dc.subjecthiringen_GB
dc.subjectfacultyen_GB
dc.subjectonlineen_GB
dc.date.available2014-05-13T16:43:09Z-
dc.date.issued2014-05-13-
dc.date.accessioned2014-05-13T16:43:09Z-
dc.conference.date2014en_GB
dc.conference.nameNursing Education Research Conference 2014en_GB
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursingen_GB
dc.conference.hostNational League of Nursingen_GB
dc.conference.locationIndianapolis, Indiana, USAen_GB
dc.descriptionNursing Education Research Conference 2014 Theme: Nursing Education Research, held in Hyatt Regency Indianapolisen_GB
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription.  Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published articleen_GB
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