Perception of Student Nurses' Bullying Behaviors and Coping Strategies Used in Clinical Settings

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/316820
Category:
Full-text
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Perception of Student Nurses' Bullying Behaviors and Coping Strategies Used in Clinical Settings
Author(s):
Mabrouk Abd El Rahman, Reem
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Phi Gamma
Author Details:
Reem Mabrouk Abd El Rahman, DNSc, RN, AT, email: r_mabrouk@hotmail.com
Abstract:

Session presented on: Saturday, April 5, 2014

Purpose: to explore bullying behaviors experienced by Damanhour nursing students in clinical nursing education, and to evaluate resources used to cope with these bullying behaviors.  Methods: A comparative descriptive study design was adopted to carry out this study, at Faculty of Nursing in Damanhour.  Total sample was all nursing students enrolled at the Faculty of Nursing - University of Damanhour at the academic year 2012-2013, (N=709). Two tools were used to collect the necessary data, consisted of three parts: Bullying Student Nurse Questionnaire; Brief COPE Inventory; and a demographic sheet.  Data were analyzed using percentages and several chi-square tests.  Results: the findings of this study revealed that 87.6 % of student nurses are experiencing bullying behaviors.  The two most frequently reported negative behaviors were: negative remarks and undervalued efforts.  Although, the most frequent source of bullying behaviors was demonstrators/clinical instructors; the confidant person, for whom students chose to report were faculty, and demonstrator/clinical instructor.  Female students reported more frequently bullying behaviors rather than male students.  The majority of students chose not to report bullying behaviors because they fear of poor evaluation, and as a response to bullying behavior "getting angry" was the most frequently reported.  Students who experienced more bullying behaviors used religion and acceptance as adaptive strategies to cope with experiences of bullying behaviors.  Conclusion: Bullying clearly exists in nursing education and is likely to continue unless nurse educators recognize the problem and agree to do something about it.  Creating an organizational culture that actively encourages reporting of bullying is a first step in addressing this problem. Implications for practice include ensuring that demonstrators/clinical instructors are well prepared for their role as educators and implementing policies that address the issue of bullying to avoid perpetuating the cycle of bullying and the socialization of negative practices.
Keywords:
nurses and bullying; coping strategies; Bullying
Repository Posting Date:
13-May-2014
Date of Publication:
13-May-2014
Conference Date:
2014
Conference Name:
Nursing Education Research Conference 2014
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursing; National League of Nursing
Conference Location:
Indianapolis, Indiana, USA
Description:
Nursing Education Research Conference 2014 Theme: Nursing Education Research, held in Hyatt Regency Indianapolis
Note:
Prior to its inclusion in the Nursing Education Research Conference 2014, the abstract for this entry was peer-reviewed pursuant to STTI event standards. The full-text document was supplied to the repository after the event as supplemental material and was not sent through a peer-review process. The addition of this supplemental material was done at the behest of the presenting author. The author is fully aware of, and agrees to, the licenses and policies of the repository.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_GB
dc.type.categoryFull-texten_GB
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titlePerception of Student Nurses' Bullying Behaviors and Coping Strategies Used in Clinical Settingsen_GB
dc.contributor.authorMabrouk Abd El Rahman, Reemen_GB
dc.contributor.departmentPhi Gammaen_GB
dc.author.detailsReem Mabrouk Abd El Rahman, DNSc, RN, AT, email: r_mabrouk@hotmail.comen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/316820-
dc.description.abstract<p>Session presented on: Saturday, April 5, 2014</p><b><i>Purpose</i></b>: to explore bullying behaviors experienced by Damanhour nursing students in clinical nursing education, and to evaluate resources used to cope with these bullying behaviors.<span>  <b><i>Methods: </i></b>A </span>comparative descriptive study design was adopted to carry out this study, at Faculty of Nursing in Damanhour.<span>  Total sample was all nursing students enrolled at the Faculty of Nursing - University of Damanhour at the academic year 2012-2013, (N=709). Two tools were used to collect the necessary data, consisted of three parts: Bullying </span>Student Nurse Questionnaire; Brief COPE Inventory; and a demographic sheet.<span>  </span>Data were analyzed using percentages and several chi-square tests. <span> </span><b><i>Results:</i></b> the findings of this study revealed that 87.6 % of student nurses are experiencing bullying behaviors.<span>  The two most frequently reported negative behaviors were: negative remarks and undervalued efforts.  Although, the most frequent source of bullying behaviors was demonstrators/clinical instructors; the confidant person, for whom students chose to report were faculty, and demonstrator/clinical instructor.  Female students reported more frequently bullying behaviors rather than male students.  The majority of students chose not to report bullying behaviors because they fear of poor evaluation, and as a response to bullying behavior "getting angry" was the most frequently reported.  Students who experienced more bullying behaviors used religion and acceptance as adaptive strategies to cope with experiences of bullying behaviors.  </span><b><i>Conclusion:</i></b> Bullying clearly exists in nursing education and is likely to continue unless nurse educators recognize the problem and agree to do something about it. <span> Creating an organizational culture that actively encourages reporting of bullying is a first step in addressing this problem. Implications for practice include ensuring that demonstrators/clinical instructors are well prepared for their role as educators and implementing policies that address the issue of bullying to avoid perpetuating the cycle of bullying and the socialization of negative practices.</span>en_GB
dc.subjectnurses and bullyingen_GB
dc.subjectcoping strategiesen_GB
dc.subjectBullyingen_GB
dc.date.available2014-05-13T16:43:12Z-
dc.date.issued2014-05-13-
dc.date.accessioned2014-05-13T16:43:12Z-
dc.conference.date2014en_GB
dc.conference.nameNursing Education Research Conference 2014en_GB
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursingen_GB
dc.conference.hostNational League of Nursingen_GB
dc.conference.locationIndianapolis, Indiana, USAen_GB
dc.descriptionNursing Education Research Conference 2014 Theme: Nursing Education Research, held in Hyatt Regency Indianapolisen_GB
dc.description.notePrior to its inclusion in the Nursing Education Research Conference 2014, the abstract for this entry was peer-reviewed pursuant to STTI event standards. The full-text document was supplied to the repository after the event as supplemental material and was not sent through a peer-review process. The addition of this supplemental material was done at the behest of the presenting author. The author is fully aware of, and agrees to, the licenses and policies of the repository.-
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