2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/316821
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Anatomy Academy: The Impact on School Nurses
Author(s):
Ray, Gaye L.; Lassetter, Jane H.
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Iota Iota
Author Details:
Gaye L. Ray, MS, PHC, RN, FNP-C, email: gaye-ray@byu.edu; Jane H. Lassetter, PhD, RN.
Abstract:

Poster presented on: Friday, April 4, 2014, Saturday, April 5, 2014

It is critical for nurses to develop expert teaching, mentoring and communication skills and to collaborate with organizations to empower individuals toward healthy lifestyles. However, few opportunities exist to engage in mentoring and teaching roles to do so.  Limited research exists on interventions to enhance student nurses’ self-perceived ability to promote healthy behaviors through teaching and mentoring in school-based interventions. The purpose of this pilot study is to examine the impact on student nurse self-perceived abilities from mentoring in a school based childhood obesity prevention program called Anatomy Academy (AA).   

Hypothesis-Mentoring in the AA program increases the nursing students’ self-perceived abilities to communicate health related concepts and to collaborate with other organizations toward common health related goals. 

Methodology-Student nurses volunteering in AA were recruited for the study (N=14). After expert faculty review of the tool, the Self-Perceived Abilities Questionnaire (SPAQ), a five item Likert type self-assessment tool, was implemented both before and after participation in AA.

Analysis-Descriptive and inferential statistics for individual items and the instrument overall at pre-test and post-test were calculated using SPSS. A paired t-test was conducted to assess changes in overall self-assessment scores from pre-test to post-test.

Findings- The overall paired t (13) = -12.4, p < .001, with Cohen’s d = 3.3. The mean (sd) pre-test score was 15.9 (3.0) and the mean (sd) post-test score was 21.1 (2.2).  Student self-assessment scores rose significantly from pre-test to post-test. Cohen’s d indicated a large effect.

Conclusion/recommendations-Students self-perceived abilities show mentoring in AA to be an effective intervention to increase student nurse self-perceived teaching, mentoring, communication and interprofessional collaboration abilities.  In the future, opportunities for student nurses to participate in interventions such as AA should be included in nursing school curriculums to help build expert teaching, mentoring, communication, and interprofessional collaboration skills.

Keywords:
Collaboration; Community Outreach; Communication, Confidence
Repository Posting Date:
13-May-2014
Date of Publication:
13-May-2014
Conference Date:
2014
Conference Name:
Nursing Education Research Conference 2014
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursing; National League of Nursing
Conference Location:
Indianapolis, Indiana, USA
Description:
Nursing Education Research Conference 2014 Theme: Nursing Education Research, held in Hyatt Regency Indianapolis
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription.  Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_GB
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_GB
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleAnatomy Academy: The Impact on School Nursesen_GB
dc.contributor.authorRay, Gaye L.en_GB
dc.contributor.authorLassetter, Jane H.en_GB
dc.contributor.departmentIota Iotaen_GB
dc.author.detailsGaye L. Ray, MS, PHC, RN, FNP-C, email: gaye-ray@byu.edu; Jane H. Lassetter, PhD, RN.en_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/316821-
dc.description.abstract<p>Poster presented on: Friday, April 4, 2014, Saturday, April 5, 2014</p>It is critical for nurses to develop expert teaching, mentoring and communication skills and to collaborate with organizations to empower individuals toward healthy lifestyles. However, few opportunities exist to engage in mentoring and teaching roles to do so.  Limited research exists on interventions to enhance student nurses’ self-perceived ability to promote healthy behaviors through teaching and mentoring in school-based interventions. The purpose of this pilot study is to examine the impact on student nurse self-perceived abilities from mentoring in a school based childhood obesity prevention program called Anatomy Academy (AA).    <p>Hypothesis-Mentoring in the AA program increases the nursing students’ self-perceived abilities to communicate health related concepts and to collaborate with other organizations toward common health related goals.  <p>Methodology-Student nurses volunteering in AA were recruited for the study (N=14). After expert faculty review of the tool, the Self-Perceived Abilities Questionnaire (SPAQ), a five item Likert type self-assessment tool, was implemented both before and after participation in AA. <p>Analysis-Descriptive and inferential statistics for individual items and the instrument overall at pre-test and post-test were calculated using SPSS. A paired t-test was conducted to assess changes in overall self-assessment scores from pre-test to post-test. <p>Findings- The overall paired t (13) = -12.4, p < .001, with Cohen’s d = 3.3. The mean (sd) pre-test score was 15.9 (3.0) and the mean (sd) post-test score was 21.1 (2.2).  Student self-assessment scores rose significantly from pre-test to post-test. Cohen’s d indicated a large effect. <p>Conclusion/recommendations-Students self-perceived abilities show mentoring in AA to be an effective intervention to increase student nurse self-perceived teaching, mentoring, communication and interprofessional collaboration abilities.  In the future, opportunities for student nurses to participate in interventions such as AA should be included in nursing school curriculums to help build expert teaching, mentoring, communication, and interprofessional collaboration skills.en_GB
dc.subjectCollaborationen_GB
dc.subjectCommunity Outreachen_GB
dc.subjectCommunication, Confidenceen_GB
dc.date.available2014-05-13T16:43:13Z-
dc.date.issued2014-05-13-
dc.date.accessioned2014-05-13T16:43:13Z-
dc.conference.date2014en_GB
dc.conference.nameNursing Education Research Conference 2014en_GB
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursingen_GB
dc.conference.hostNational League of Nursingen_GB
dc.conference.locationIndianapolis, Indiana, USAen_GB
dc.descriptionNursing Education Research Conference 2014 Theme: Nursing Education Research, held in Hyatt Regency Indianapolisen_GB
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription.  Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published articleen_GB
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