Active Teaching Strategies for a Sense of Salience: End-of-Life Communication

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/316823
Category:
Full-text
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Active Teaching Strategies for a Sense of Salience: End-of-Life Communication
Author(s):
Kopp, Mary Louisa
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Non-member
Author Details:
Mary Louisa Kopp, PhD, MSN, RN, CHPN, CNE
Abstract:
Session presented on: Friday, April 4, 2014: The problem addressed was twofold: �First, passive lecture prevents transfer to situational decision-making, or a sense of salience (Benner, Sutphen, Leonard, & Day, 2010).� Nursing education pedagogy is in need of revision.� Many nurse educators teach from tacit, or experience in how they were originally taught.� Nurse educators must prioritize utilization of educational science.� Active teaching models are meant to encourage a sense of salience by integrating theory and practice (Benner et al., 2010).� However, the inconsistent nature of active learning definitions prevents generalization of research findings.� Fink (2013) provided a structured definition for active teaching strategies that compliments learning domains created by Bloom, Englehart, Furst, Hill, and� Krathwohl (1956).� Second, death discussions are more complicated than standard communication courses teach.� The COMFORT model (Wittenberg-Lyles, Goldsmith, Ferrell, & Ragan, 2013), was validated for nursing education.� This study compared active teaching strategies with passive lecture by evaluating cognitive, affective, and psychomotor learning outcomes, while highlighting the need for end-of-life communication in nursing education.� The design was comparative, quasi-experimental, and posttest-only with control.� Instruments included a multiple-choice test (Malloy, Virani,� Kelly, & Munevar, 2010), a survey measuring openness toward end-of-life communication (Questionnaire for Understanding the Dying Person and His/Her Family, Yeaworth, Kapp, & Winget, 1974), and an observational checklist called the Simulated Client End-of-Life Communication Scale-(SCEOLCS), revised from the Simulated Client Interview Rating Scale (Arthur, 1999).� Significant psychomotor differences were revealed (t(46) = -5.65, p=<.001).� The SCEOLCS demonstrated internal consistency (a =.902).� Active teaching strategies improved the nursing student�s sense of salience during end-of-life communication.� Ultimately, nursing students were better prepared for one of their most underestimated and rewarding roles, caring for dying patients and their families.
Keywords:
Active Teaching Strategies; End-of-Life; Communication
Repository Posting Date:
13-May-2014
Date of Publication:
13-May-2014
Conference Date:
2014
Conference Name:
Nursing Education Research Conference 2014
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursing; National League of Nursing
Conference Location:
Indianapolis, Indiana, USA
Description:
Nursing Education Research Conference 2014 Theme: Nursing Education Research, held in Hyatt Regency Indianapolis

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.type.categoryFull-texten
dc.typePresentationen
dc.titleActive Teaching Strategies for a Sense of Salience: End-of-Life Communicationen
dc.contributor.authorKopp, Mary Louisaen
dc.contributor.departmentNon-memberen
dc.author.detailsMary Louisa Kopp, PhD, MSN, RN, CHPN, CNEen
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/316823-
dc.description.abstractSession presented on: Friday, April 4, 2014: The problem addressed was twofold: �First, passive lecture prevents transfer to situational decision-making, or a sense of salience (Benner, Sutphen, Leonard, & Day, 2010).� Nursing education pedagogy is in need of revision.� Many nurse educators teach from tacit, or experience in how they were originally taught.� Nurse educators must prioritize utilization of educational science.� Active teaching models are meant to encourage a sense of salience by integrating theory and practice (Benner et al., 2010).� However, the inconsistent nature of active learning definitions prevents generalization of research findings.� Fink (2013) provided a structured definition for active teaching strategies that compliments learning domains created by Bloom, Englehart, Furst, Hill, and� Krathwohl (1956).� Second, death discussions are more complicated than standard communication courses teach.� The COMFORT model (Wittenberg-Lyles, Goldsmith, Ferrell, & Ragan, 2013), was validated for nursing education.� This study compared active teaching strategies with passive lecture by evaluating cognitive, affective, and psychomotor learning outcomes, while highlighting the need for end-of-life communication in nursing education.� The design was comparative, quasi-experimental, and posttest-only with control.� Instruments included a multiple-choice test (Malloy, Virani,� Kelly, & Munevar, 2010), a survey measuring openness toward end-of-life communication (Questionnaire for Understanding the Dying Person and His/Her Family, Yeaworth, Kapp, & Winget, 1974), and an observational checklist called the Simulated Client End-of-Life Communication Scale-(SCEOLCS), revised from the Simulated Client Interview Rating Scale (Arthur, 1999).� Significant psychomotor differences were revealed (t(46) = -5.65, p=<.001).� The SCEOLCS demonstrated internal consistency (a =.902).� Active teaching strategies improved the nursing student�s sense of salience during end-of-life communication.� Ultimately, nursing students were better prepared for one of their most underestimated and rewarding roles, caring for dying patients and their families.en
dc.subjectActive Teaching Strategiesen
dc.subjectEnd-of-Lifeen
dc.subjectCommunicationen
dc.date.available2014-05-13T16:43:16Z-
dc.date.issued2014-05-13en
dc.date.accessioned2014-05-13T16:43:16Z-
dc.conference.date2014en
dc.conference.nameNursing Education Research Conference 2014en_GB
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursingen_GB
dc.conference.hostNational League of Nursingen_GB
dc.conference.locationIndianapolis, Indiana, USAen_GB
dc.descriptionNursing Education Research Conference 2014 Theme: Nursing Education Research, held in Hyatt Regency Indianapolisen
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