Active Teaching Strategies for a Sense of Salience: End-of-Life Communication

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/316823
Category:
Full-text
Format:
Text-based Document
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Active Teaching Strategies for a Sense of Salience: End-of-Life Communication
Other Titles:
End-of-Life
Author(s):
Kopp, Mary Louisa
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Non-member
Author Details:
Mary Louisa Kopp, PhD, MSN, RN, CHPN, CNE
Abstract:
Session presented on: Friday, April 4, 2014: The problem addressed was twofold: First, passive lecture prevents transfer to situational decision-making, or a sense of salience (Benner, Sutphen, Leonard, & Day, 2010). Nursing education pedagogy is in need of revision. Many nurse educators teach from tacit, or experience in how they were originally taught. Nurse educators must prioritize utilization of educational science. Active teaching models are meant to encourage a sense of salience by integrating theory and practice (Benner et al., 2010). However, the inconsistent nature of active learning definitions prevents generalization of research findings. Fink (2013) provided a structured definition for active teaching strategies that compliments learning domains created by Bloom, Englehart, Furst, Hill, and Krathwohl (1956). Second, death discussions are more complicated than standard communication courses teach. The COMFORT model (Wittenberg-Lyles, Goldsmith, Ferrell, & Ragan, 2013), was validated for nursing education. This study compared active teaching strategies with passive lecture by evaluating cognitive, affective, and psychomotor learning outcomes, while highlighting the need for end-of-life communication in nursing education. The design was comparative, quasi-experimental, and posttest-only with control. Instruments included a multiple-choice test (Malloy, Virani, Kelly, & Munevar, 2010), a survey measuring openness toward end-of-life communication (Questionnaire for Understanding the Dying Person and His/Her Family, Yeaworth, Kapp, & Winget, 1974), and an observational checklist called the Simulated Client End-of-Life Communication Scale-(SCEOLCS), revised from the Simulated Client Interview Rating Scale (Arthur, 1999). Significant psychomotor differences were revealed (t(46) = -5.65, p=<.001). The SCEOLCS demonstrated internal consistency (a =.902). Active teaching strategies improved the nursing student's sense of salience during end-of-life communication. Ultimately, nursing students were better prepared for one of their most underestimated and rewarding roles, caring for dying patients and their families.
Keywords:
Active Teaching Strategies; End-of-Life; Communication
Repository Posting Date:
13-May-2014
Date of Publication:
13-May-2014
Other Identifiers:
NERC14C01
Conference Date:
2014
Conference Name:
Nursing Education Research Conference 2014
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursing; National League of Nursing
Conference Location:
Indianapolis, Indiana, USA
Description:
Nursing Education Research Conference 2014 Theme: Nursing Education Research, held in Hyatt Regency Indianapolis

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.type.categoryFull-texten
dc.formatText-based Documenten
dc.typePresentationen
dc.titleActive Teaching Strategies for a Sense of Salience: End-of-Life Communicationen
dc.title.alternativeEnd-of-Lifeen
dc.contributor.authorKopp, Mary Louisaen
dc.contributor.departmentNon-memberen
dc.author.detailsMary Louisa Kopp, PhD, MSN, RN, CHPN, CNEen
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/316823-
dc.description.abstractSession presented on: Friday, April 4, 2014: The problem addressed was twofold: First, passive lecture prevents transfer to situational decision-making, or a sense of salience (Benner, Sutphen, Leonard, & Day, 2010). Nursing education pedagogy is in need of revision. Many nurse educators teach from tacit, or experience in how they were originally taught. Nurse educators must prioritize utilization of educational science. Active teaching models are meant to encourage a sense of salience by integrating theory and practice (Benner et al., 2010). However, the inconsistent nature of active learning definitions prevents generalization of research findings. Fink (2013) provided a structured definition for active teaching strategies that compliments learning domains created by Bloom, Englehart, Furst, Hill, and Krathwohl (1956). Second, death discussions are more complicated than standard communication courses teach. The COMFORT model (Wittenberg-Lyles, Goldsmith, Ferrell, & Ragan, 2013), was validated for nursing education. This study compared active teaching strategies with passive lecture by evaluating cognitive, affective, and psychomotor learning outcomes, while highlighting the need for end-of-life communication in nursing education. The design was comparative, quasi-experimental, and posttest-only with control. Instruments included a multiple-choice test (Malloy, Virani, Kelly, & Munevar, 2010), a survey measuring openness toward end-of-life communication (Questionnaire for Understanding the Dying Person and His/Her Family, Yeaworth, Kapp, & Winget, 1974), and an observational checklist called the Simulated Client End-of-Life Communication Scale-(SCEOLCS), revised from the Simulated Client Interview Rating Scale (Arthur, 1999). Significant psychomotor differences were revealed (t(46) = -5.65, p=<.001). The SCEOLCS demonstrated internal consistency (a =.902). Active teaching strategies improved the nursing student's sense of salience during end-of-life communication. Ultimately, nursing students were better prepared for one of their most underestimated and rewarding roles, caring for dying patients and their families.en
dc.subjectActive Teaching Strategiesen
dc.subjectEnd-of-Lifeen
dc.subjectCommunicationen
dc.date.available2014-05-13T16:43:16Z-
dc.date.issued2014-05-13en
dc.date.accessioned2014-05-13T16:43:16Z-
dc.conference.date2014en
dc.conference.nameNursing Education Research Conference 2014en
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursingen
dc.conference.hostNational League of Nursingen
dc.conference.locationIndianapolis, Indiana, USAen
dc.descriptionNursing Education Research Conference 2014 Theme: Nursing Education Research, held in Hyatt Regency Indianapolisen
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