The Impact of Critical Thinking upon Clinical Judgment during Simulation with Senior Nursing Students

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/316827
Category:
Full-text
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The Impact of Critical Thinking upon Clinical Judgment during Simulation with Senior Nursing Students
Author(s):
Cazzell, Mary A.; Anderson, Mindi
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Delta Theta
Author Details:
Mary A. Cazzell, PhD, RN, email: mary.cazzell@cookchildrens.org; Mindi Anderson, PhD, RN, CPNP-PC, CNE, CHSE, ANEF;
Abstract:

Session presented on: Friday, April 4, 2014

 The purpose was to examine the impact of critical thinking (CT) upon clinical judgment (CJ) during pediatric medication administration Objective Structured Clinical Evaluations (OSCE) with 160 pre-licensure baccalaureate senior-level nursing students. Nurse educators are now called to “radically transform” teaching strategies from a focus on CT to CJ in order to bridge the education-practice gap. The problem of overlapping definitions of CT and CJ further confuses the direction of these teaching strategies. 

 A descriptive correlational study design was used to examine the strength of relationships between CT components: demographics, scores on the Tower of Hanoi (TOH; behavioral measure of CT), and total and five subscale scores on the Health Science Reasoning Test (HSRT; standardized computer test for CT). CJ was measured by total scores on the Lasater Clinical Judgment Rubric (LCJR) from researcher-reviewed videotaped OSCE performances. Descriptive statistics were used to describe sample and measurement scores. Multiple regression analysis examined how twelve CT components accounted for variance in CJ. 

 Of 160 students, 85% were female, 42% Caucasian, mean age of 26 years, with 49% having healthcare experience. For the 15-task TOH), students averaged 13 minutes to completion; required an average of seven moves over minimum to complete each task. Students averaged 25 points on HSRT with Induction as highest score, Inference as lowest. Reviewer-based LCJR scores (total points = 44) averaged 31 for the OSCEs. Four CT variables were statistically significant as predictors of CJ: gender, African-American, HSRT deduction, and HSRT analysis. Twelve CT variables accounted for 17% of LCJR score variance. 

 In CT, levels of deduction, analysis, gender and ethnicity predicted degrees of clinical judgment. Nurse educators can develop innovative teaching strategies that offer attention to these predictors of clinical judgment. CT and CJ require separate concise definitions since there was a small overlap between CT and CJ components.

Keywords:
critical thinking; simulation; clinical reasoning
Repository Posting Date:
13-May-2014
Date of Publication:
13-May-2014
Conference Date:
2014
Conference Name:
Nursing Education Research Conference 2014
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursing; National League of Nursing
Conference Location:
Indianapolis, Indiana, USA
Description:
Nursing Education Research Conference 2014 Theme: Nursing Education Research, held in Hyatt Regency Indianapolis

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_GB
dc.type.categoryFull-texten_GB
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThe Impact of Critical Thinking upon Clinical Judgment during Simulation with Senior Nursing Studentsen_GB
dc.contributor.authorCazzell, Mary A.en_GB
dc.contributor.authorAnderson, Mindien_GB
dc.contributor.departmentDelta Thetaen_GB
dc.author.detailsMary A. Cazzell, PhD, RN, email: mary.cazzell@cookchildrens.org; Mindi Anderson, PhD, RN, CPNP-PC, CNE, CHSE, ANEF;en_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/316827-
dc.description.abstract<p>Session presented on: Friday, April 4, 2014</p><b> </b>The purpose was to examine the impact of critical thinking (CT) upon clinical judgment (CJ) during pediatric medication administration Objective Structured Clinical Evaluations (OSCE) with 160 pre-licensure baccalaureate senior-level nursing students. Nurse educators are now called to “radically transform” teaching strategies from a focus on CT to CJ in order to bridge the education-practice gap. The problem of overlapping definitions of CT and CJ further confuses the direction of these teaching strategies.<b> </b><p><b> </b>A descriptive correlational study design was used to examine the strength of relationships between CT components: demographics, scores on the Tower of Hanoi (TOH; behavioral measure of CT), and total and five subscale scores on the Health Science Reasoning Test (HSRT; standardized computer test for CT). CJ was measured by total scores on the Lasater Clinical Judgment Rubric (LCJR) from researcher-reviewed videotaped OSCE performances. Descriptive statistics were used to describe sample and measurement scores. Multiple regression analysis examined how twelve CT components accounted for variance in CJ.  <p><b> </b>Of 160 students, 85% were female, 42% Caucasian, mean age of 26 years, with 49% having healthcare experience. For the 15-task TOH), students averaged 13 minutes to completion; required an average of seven moves over minimum to complete each task. Students averaged 25 points on HSRT with Induction as highest score, Inference as lowest. Reviewer-based LCJR scores (total points = 44) averaged 31 for the OSCEs. Four CT variables were statistically significant as predictors of CJ: gender, African-American, HSRT deduction, and HSRT analysis. Twelve CT variables accounted for 17% of LCJR score variance.  <p><b> </b>In CT, levels of deduction, analysis, gender and ethnicity predicted degrees of clinical judgment. Nurse educators can develop innovative teaching strategies that offer attention to these predictors of clinical judgment. CT and CJ require separate concise definitions since there was a small overlap between CT and CJ components.en_GB
dc.subjectcritical thinkingen_GB
dc.subjectsimulationen_GB
dc.subjectclinical reasoningen_GB
dc.date.available2014-05-13T16:43:23Z-
dc.date.issued2014-05-13-
dc.date.accessioned2014-05-13T16:43:23Z-
dc.conference.date2014en_GB
dc.conference.nameNursing Education Research Conference 2014en_GB
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursingen_GB
dc.conference.hostNational League of Nursingen_GB
dc.conference.locationIndianapolis, Indiana, USAen_GB
dc.descriptionNursing Education Research Conference 2014 Theme: Nursing Education Research, held in Hyatt Regency Indianapolisen_GB
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