2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/316831
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Comparing Human Patient Simulation to Traditional Case Study
Author(s):
Gazaway, Shena Borders
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Beta Omicron
Author Details:
Shena Borders Gazaway, MSN, BSN, email: sgazaway@gru.edu
Abstract:

Poster presented on: Saturday, April 5, 2014, Friday, April 4, 2014

Background: High-fidelity patient simulation (HFPS) and case study are two teaching methods used for nursing education. Both teaching methods help the student to think critically, use diagnostic reasoning, and assess patients to improve their clinical competence skills. This study compared the impact HFPS and case study methods had on clinical judgment, knowledge acquisition, and the suspension of disbelief among senior nursing students.

Methods: This study was conducted at a small private university with 40 senior nursing students in four clinical groups. Each group participated in both HFPS and case study experiences. A pretest/post-test quantitative design measured clinical judgment, knowledge acquisition, and suspension of disbelief. Clinical judgment was measured by the Lasater Clinical Judgment Rubric, knowledge acquisition by two topic quizzes, and suspension of disbelief via a custom survey. ANOVA and/or paired t-test statistics were used to determine group differences with a .05 level of significance.

Results: Clinical judgment scores were not significantly different between student groups for either the HFPS or case study methods. No significant differences were found with the knowledge acquisition scores (p=.347), although HFPS had a greater difference between pre-and post-scores (8.13) compared to case study (3.13). Students reported that HFPS provided for a greater suspension of disbelief (72%) than case study (56%). These findings suggested that both HFPS and case study yielded similar gains in clinical judgment and knowledge acquisition, while the students suspended their disbelief more with the HFPS method.

Conclusions: Both HFPS and case study are dynamic teaching methods that equally provide students with the opportunity to enhance their critical thinking, reasoning and assessment skills. Although this study demonstrated no significant difference in knowledge acquisition with either teaching method, more research is needed to determine the best combination of education methodologies that enhance development of clinical competence skills in nursing students.

Keywords:
educational methods; clinicl judgement; nursing students
Repository Posting Date:
13-May-2014
Date of Publication:
13-May-2014
Conference Date:
2014
Conference Name:
Nursing Education Research Conference 2014
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursing; National League of Nursing
Conference Location:
Indianapolis, Indiana, USA
Description:
Nursing Education Research Conference 2014 Theme: Nursing Education Research, held in Hyatt Regency Indianapolis
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription.  Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_GB
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_GB
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleComparing Human Patient Simulation to Traditional Case Studyen_GB
dc.contributor.authorGazaway, Shena Bordersen_GB
dc.contributor.departmentBeta Omicronen_GB
dc.author.detailsShena Borders Gazaway, MSN, BSN, email: sgazaway@gru.eduen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/316831-
dc.description.abstract<p>Poster presented on: Saturday, April 5, 2014, Friday, April 4, 2014</p>Background: High-fidelity patient simulation (HFPS) and case study are two teaching methods used for nursing education. Both teaching methods help the student to think critically, use diagnostic reasoning, and assess patients to improve their clinical competence skills. This study compared the impact HFPS and case study methods had on clinical judgment, knowledge acquisition, and the suspension of disbelief among senior nursing students. <p>Methods: This study was conducted at a small private university with 40 senior nursing students in four clinical groups. Each group participated in both HFPS and case study experiences. A pretest/post-test quantitative design measured clinical judgment, knowledge acquisition, and suspension of disbelief. Clinical judgment was measured by the Lasater Clinical Judgment Rubric, knowledge acquisition by two topic quizzes, and suspension of disbelief via a custom survey. ANOVA and/or paired t-test statistics were used to determine group differences with a .05 level of significance. <p>Results: Clinical judgment scores were not significantly different between student groups for either the HFPS or case study methods. No significant differences were found with the knowledge acquisition scores (<i>p</i>=.347), although HFPS had a greater difference between pre-and post-scores (8.13) compared to case study (3.13). Students reported that HFPS provided for a greater suspension of disbelief (72%) than case study (56%). These findings suggested that both HFPS and case study yielded similar gains in clinical judgment and knowledge acquisition, while the students suspended their disbelief more with the HFPS method. <p>Conclusions: Both HFPS and case study are dynamic teaching methods that equally provide students with the opportunity to enhance their critical thinking, reasoning and assessment skills. Although this study demonstrated no significant difference in knowledge acquisition with either teaching method, more research is needed to determine the best combination of education methodologies that enhance development of clinical competence skills in nursing students.en_GB
dc.subjecteducational methodsen_GB
dc.subjectclinicl judgementen_GB
dc.subjectnursing studentsen_GB
dc.date.available2014-05-13T16:43:29Z-
dc.date.issued2014-05-13-
dc.date.accessioned2014-05-13T16:43:29Z-
dc.conference.date2014en_GB
dc.conference.nameNursing Education Research Conference 2014en_GB
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursingen_GB
dc.conference.hostNational League of Nursingen_GB
dc.conference.locationIndianapolis, Indiana, USAen_GB
dc.descriptionNursing Education Research Conference 2014 Theme: Nursing Education Research, held in Hyatt Regency Indianapolisen_GB
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription.  Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published articleen_GB
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