Preparation for Nurse Educator and Faculty Roles in Nursing PhD/EdD Programs in the United States

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/316850
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Preparation for Nurse Educator and Faculty Roles in Nursing PhD/EdD Programs in the United States
Author(s):
Billings, Diane McGovern
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Alpha
Author Details:
Diane M. Billings, EdD, RN, ANEF, FAAN, email: dbillin@iupui.edu
Abstract:
Preparation for Nurse Educator and Faculty Roles in Nursing PhD/EdD Programs in the United States 

The faculty shortage continues, and despite calls from national groups and professional organizations to double the number of doctorally prepared faculty, there is still insufficient numbers of nurses prepared for faculty roles, to develop the science of nursing education, and/ or as nurse educators in academic and health care settings. This study sought to determine the number of nursing PhD/ EdD programs with an education concentration that prepare nurses to meet these needs.  Data were obtained from a review of the web sites of 126 PhD/EdD programs.  The review included 1) stated purpose and goals of the program; 2) evidence of availability of nurse educator courses in a MS degree or certificate in Nursing Education program; 3) presence of a Preparing Future Faculty (PFF) course; 4) programs with purpose and/or goals for graduates to teach or work in academia who did not have educator or faculty preparation courses; 5) distance accessibility; and 6) availability of the Nurse Faculty Loan Program. Descriptive statistics were used to analyze the data. Thirty four (29%) of the PhD/EdD programs prepare nurse educators as leaders, scholars, and/ or scientists; 51 (40%) have master’s level courses or post-masters teaching certificates.   Seventeen (13%) of the programs have a PPF program; 52 (41%) are distance accessible, and 33 (26%) of the programs offer the Nurse Faculty Loan Program.   Twelve (9%) of the schools state they are preparing graduates to be faculty, but don’t have courses related to the teaching role of faculty. Recommendations are offered for preparing nurse educators for developing the science of nursing education, or as leaders in nursing education in academic and clinical settings.  All doctoral programs can prepare graduates for faculty roles.

Keywords:
Support in PhD Program; Increasing Doctorally Prepared Nurses; PhD/EdD Programs
Repository Posting Date:
13-May-2014
Date of Publication:
13-May-2014
Conference Date:
2014
Conference Name:
Nursing Education Research Conference 2014
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursing; National League of Nursing
Conference Location:
Indianapolis, Indiana, USA
Description:
Nursing Education Research Conference 2014 Theme: Nursing Education Research, held in Hyatt Regency Indianapolis

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_GB
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_GB
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titlePreparation for Nurse Educator and Faculty Roles in Nursing PhD/EdD Programs in the United Statesen_GB
dc.contributor.authorBillings, Diane McGovernen_GB
dc.contributor.departmentAlphaen_GB
dc.author.detailsDiane M. Billings, EdD, RN, ANEF, FAAN, email: dbillin@iupui.eduen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/316850-
dc.description.abstractPreparation for Nurse Educator and Faculty Roles in Nursing PhD/EdD Programs in the United States  <p>The faculty shortage continues, and despite calls from national groups and professional organizations to double the number of doctorally prepared faculty, there is still insufficient numbers of nurses prepared for faculty roles, to develop the science of nursing education, and/ or as nurse educators in academic and health care settings. This study sought to determine the number of nursing PhD/ EdD programs with an education concentration that prepare nurses to meet these needs.  Data were obtained from a review of the web sites of 126 PhD/EdD programs.  The review included 1) stated purpose and goals of the program; 2) evidence of availability of nurse educator courses in a MS degree or certificate in Nursing Education program; 3) presence of a Preparing Future Faculty (PFF) course; 4) programs with purpose and/or goals for graduates to teach or work in academia who did <i>not</i> have educator or faculty preparation courses; 5) distance accessibility; and 6) availability of the Nurse Faculty Loan Program. Descriptive statistics were used to analyze the data. Thirty four (29%) of the PhD/EdD programs prepare nurse educators as leaders, scholars, and/ or scientists; 51 (40%) have master’s level courses or post-masters teaching certificates.   Seventeen (13%) of the programs have a PPF program; 52 (41%) are distance accessible, and 33 (26%) of the programs offer the Nurse Faculty Loan Program.   Twelve (9%) of the schools state they are preparing graduates to be faculty, but don’t have courses related to the teaching role of faculty. Recommendations are offered for preparing nurse educators for developing the science of nursing education, or as leaders in nursing education in academic and clinical settings.  All doctoral programs can prepare graduates for faculty roles.en_GB
dc.subjectSupport in PhD Programen_GB
dc.subjectIncreasing Doctorally Prepared Nursesen_GB
dc.subjectPhD/EdD Programsen_GB
dc.date.available2014-05-13T16:43:57Z-
dc.date.issued2014-05-13-
dc.date.accessioned2014-05-13T16:43:57Z-
dc.conference.date2014en_GB
dc.conference.nameNursing Education Research Conference 2014en_GB
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursingen_GB
dc.conference.hostNational League of Nursingen_GB
dc.conference.locationIndianapolis, Indiana, USAen_GB
dc.descriptionNursing Education Research Conference 2014 Theme: Nursing Education Research, held in Hyatt Regency Indianapolisen_GB
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