2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/316855
Category:
Full-text
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Grading Rubrics: What's in it for Faculty?
Author(s):
Phillips, Candice; Choudhury, Rachel
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Phi Pi
Author Details:
Candice Phillips, PhD, APRN, CNM, RN, CNE, email: cphillips2@chamberlain.edu; Rachel Choudhury, MSN, MS, RN, CNE
Abstract:

Session presented on: Friday, April 4, 2014

Higher education literature recognizes the vital role that grading rubrics exert on improving student academic performance (Howell, 2011). As an assessment tool, rubrics allocate points to specific evaluative criteria to gauge student performance (Truemper, 2004).  Benefits of rubric assessment have been noted to include: increased student understanding of instructor expectations (Oakleaf, 2008) and more meaningful grading experiences due to clearly stated evaluative criteria (Brescian, Zelna & Anderson, 2004). An analytic rubric, which allows for separate evaluation of each component of the assignment, has been shown to provide objective formative feedback to guide student performance (Oakleaf, 2009). In addition, studies of administrative and pedagogical advantages to using grading rubrics have been documented (Solan & Linardopoulos, 2011). Despite the growing body of research on rubric assessment as it relates to student perceptions and performance, few findings focus on the rigorous use of standardized rubric tools in instructional and program assessments, or on the perceptions of faculty who use these standardized assessment tools (Reddy & Andrade, 2010).

This presentation will present findings from a mixed method study that examined the use of standardized analytic rubrics for student assessment, and the perceptions of faculty who use them. A survey design methodology, involving both pre- and post-tests, was utilized to establish the effectiveness of standardized rubric-based interventions. Using a similar survey design, our audience will be actively engaged through the use of audience response systems in discussing analysis of findings.

Keywords:
Standardized Analytic Grading Rubrics; Faculty Perceptions; Teaching-Learning Practices
Repository Posting Date:
13-May-2014
Date of Publication:
13-May-2014
Conference Date:
2014
Conference Name:
Nursing Education Research Conference 2014
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursing; National League of Nursing
Conference Location:
Indianapolis, Indiana, USA
Description:
Nursing Education Research Conference 2014 Theme: Nursing Education Research, held in Hyatt Regency Indianapolis

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_GB
dc.type.categoryFull-texten_GB
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleGrading Rubrics: What's in it for Faculty?en_GB
dc.contributor.authorPhillips, Candiceen_GB
dc.contributor.authorChoudhury, Rachelen_GB
dc.contributor.departmentPhi Pien_GB
dc.author.detailsCandice Phillips, PhD, APRN, CNM, RN, CNE, email: cphillips2@chamberlain.edu; Rachel Choudhury, MSN, MS, RN, CNEen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/316855-
dc.description.abstract<p>Session presented on: Friday, April 4, 2014</p>Higher education literature recognizes the vital role that grading rubrics exert on improving student academic performance (Howell, 2011). As an assessment tool, rubrics allocate points to specific evaluative criteria to gauge student performance (Truemper, 2004).  Benefits of rubric assessment have been noted to include: increased student understanding of instructor expectations (Oakleaf, 2008) and more meaningful grading experiences due to clearly stated evaluative criteria (Brescian, Zelna & Anderson, 2004). An analytic rubric, which allows for separate evaluation of each component of the assignment, has been shown to provide objective formative feedback to guide student performance (Oakleaf, 2009). In addition, studies of administrative and pedagogical advantages to using grading rubrics have been documented (Solan & Linardopoulos, 2011). Despite the growing body of research on rubric assessment as it relates to student perceptions and performance, few findings focus on the rigorous use of standardized rubric tools in instructional and program assessments, or on the perceptions of faculty who use these standardized assessment tools (Reddy & Andrade, 2010). <div><p class="Default">This presentation will present findings from a mixed method study that examined the use of standardized analytic rubrics for student assessment, and the perceptions of faculty who use them. A survey design methodology, involving both pre- and post-tests, was utilized to establish the effectiveness of standardized rubric-based interventions. Using a similar survey design, our audience will be actively engaged through the use of audience response systems in discussing analysis of findings.en_GB
dc.subjectStandardized Analytic Grading Rubricsen_GB
dc.subjectFaculty Perceptionsen_GB
dc.subjectTeaching-Learning Practicesen_GB
dc.date.available2014-05-13T16:44:05Z-
dc.date.issued2014-05-13-
dc.date.accessioned2014-05-13T16:44:05Z-
dc.conference.date2014en_GB
dc.conference.nameNursing Education Research Conference 2014en_GB
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursingen_GB
dc.conference.hostNational League of Nursingen_GB
dc.conference.locationIndianapolis, Indiana, USAen_GB
dc.descriptionNursing Education Research Conference 2014 Theme: Nursing Education Research, held in Hyatt Regency Indianapolisen_GB
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