2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/316868
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Blended Learning in the Doctor of Nursing Practice Classroom
Author(s):
Rice, Elizabeth I.
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Non-member
Author Details:
Elizabeth I. Rice, PhD, RN, email: eirice@wisc.edu
Abstract:

Poster presented on: Friday, April 4, 2014, Saturday, April 5, 2014

Blended learning is the purposeful combination of on-line and in person classes to optimize student learning (Garrison & Vaughan, 2008). Institutions of higher education have seen a strong and growing interest in blended learning over the last ten years. In undergraduate education both faculty and students report that blended learning approaches can improve learning experiences and educational outcomes (Garrison & Vaughan, 208). Students’ learning is enhanced when they are intensely involved in their education and are asked to think about and apply what they are learning in different settings. Graduate programs in nursing are expanding, particularly doctor of nursing practice (DNP) programs which often implement a blended learning curriculum. Despite this growth, relatively little research has been conducted among graduate nursing students to assess their satisfaction and learning gains with a blended learning approach. The purpose of this qualitative study is to describe DNP student learning gains, attitudes and satisfaction with a blended learning classroom experience. The sample included fourteen graduate nursing students enrolled in a blended learning graduate policy class. Participants were interviewed and asked open-ended questions about their learning gains, engagement level with the course materials and overall satisfaction. The data were analyzed using qualitative descriptive analysis as described by Sandelowski (1995, 2000, 2010).  Students reported significant learning gains in the course. They felt that the blended learning environment improved their engagement in their own learning. Themes identified include Enhanced Knowledge, Engaged Learning and Environmental Perspectives. This presentation will include results from this study as well as a discussion of best practices in designing blended learning courses to enhance graduate nursing student engagement and learning.

Keywords:
Blended learning; Doctor of Nursing Practice
Repository Posting Date:
13-May-2014
Date of Publication:
13-May-2014
Conference Date:
2014
Conference Name:
Nursing Education Research Conference 2014
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursing; National League of Nursing
Conference Location:
Indianapolis, Indiana, USA
Description:
Nursing Education Research Conference 2014 Theme: Nursing Education Research, held in Hyatt Regency Indianapolis
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription.  Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_GB
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_GB
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleBlended Learning in the Doctor of Nursing Practice Classroomen_GB
dc.contributor.authorRice, Elizabeth I.en_GB
dc.contributor.departmentNon-memberen_GB
dc.author.detailsElizabeth I. Rice, PhD, RN, email: eirice@wisc.eduen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/316868-
dc.description.abstract<p>Poster presented on: Friday, April 4, 2014, Saturday, April 5, 2014</p><p>Blended learning is the purposeful combination of on-line and in person classes to optimize student learning (Garrison & Vaughan, 2008). Institutions of higher education have seen a strong and growing interest in blended learning over the last ten years. In undergraduate education both faculty and students report that blended learning approaches can improve learning experiences and educational outcomes (Garrison & Vaughan, 208). Students’ learning is enhanced when they are intensely involved in their education and are asked to think about and apply what they are learning in different settings. Graduate programs in nursing are expanding, particularly doctor of nursing practice (DNP) programs which often implement a blended learning curriculum. Despite this growth, relatively little research has been conducted among graduate nursing students to assess their satisfaction and learning gains with a blended learning approach. The purpose of this qualitative study is to describe DNP student learning gains, attitudes and satisfaction with a blended learning classroom experience. The sample included fourteen graduate nursing students enrolled in a blended learning graduate policy class. Participants were interviewed and asked open-ended questions about their learning gains, engagement level with the course materials and overall satisfaction. The data were analyzed using qualitative descriptive analysis as described by Sandelowski (1995, 2000, 2010). <span> </span>Students reported significant learning gains in the course. They felt that the blended learning environment improved their engagement in their own learning. Themes identified include Enhanced Knowledge, Engaged Learning and Environmental Perspectives. This presentation will include results from this study as well as a discussion of best practices in designing blended learning courses to enhance graduate nursing student engagement and learning.en_GB
dc.subjectBlended learningen_GB
dc.subjectDoctor of Nursing Practiceen_GB
dc.date.available2014-05-13T16:44:19Z-
dc.date.issued2014-05-13-
dc.date.accessioned2014-05-13T16:44:19Z-
dc.conference.date2014en_GB
dc.conference.nameNursing Education Research Conference 2014en_GB
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursingen_GB
dc.conference.hostNational League of Nursingen_GB
dc.conference.locationIndianapolis, Indiana, USAen_GB
dc.descriptionNursing Education Research Conference 2014 Theme: Nursing Education Research, held in Hyatt Regency Indianapolisen_GB
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription.  Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published articleen_GB
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