An Innovative Educational Approach to Facilitating Student Nurses' Clinical Reasoning Skills Development in Indonesia: A Quasi-Experimental Study

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/316874
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
An Innovative Educational Approach to Facilitating Student Nurses' Clinical Reasoning Skills Development in Indonesia: A Quasi-Experimental Study
Author(s):
Yauri, Indriani
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Non-member
Author Details:
Indriani Yauri, MN, RN, email: ijauri@yahoo.com
Abstract:

Poster presented on: Friday, April 4, 2014, Saturday, April 5, 2014

Introduction: Developing clinical judgment is one of top three training needs identified for nurses in North Sulawesi regions, Indonesia [1].Accordingly, curricula and teaching approaches that facilitate the development of skills which underpin nurses’ clinical judgment, such as clinical reasoning skills are of prime importance to enable graduates to provide effective care. This study aims to examine the effect of the educational package on students’ attitudes regarding clinical reasoning.

 

Methods: A sample of 85 nursing students in the high-risk pregnancy subject was recruited in a quasi-experimental design study. The Indonesian version of California Critical Thinking Disposition Inventory (CCTDI) (Cronbach’s alpha 0.90) [2] was used to collect data on pre- and post a 6-week Educational Intervention (EI). Both Independent and paired sample t-tests were conducted and eta squared effect size (ES) was identified. A significant level of p<0.05 was employed.

Results: At Time 2 there was no statistically significant difference between the overall CCTDI scores for the intervention (IG) and control groups (IG) (p=.40). The ES was very small (eta squared = .008). However, the IG scored significantly higher than the CG on the Systematicity sub-scale (p=.006). A moderate ES (eta squared = .08) was identified. The scores of IG and CG were significantly higher on the Truth-seeking sub-scale: IG (p =. 02) and CG: (p =. 008) and, although not statistically significant, the Confidence in Reasoning scores increased for the IG but decreased for the CG.

Conclusion: This study highlights the complexities involved in examining clinical reasoning skills. Although the CCTDI can measure some students’ attitudes regarding clinical reasoning, It is imperative to employ more specific clinical reasoning measurement tools to gather more inclusive results.

Implication: The results will make a significant and unique contribution to knowledge about educational strategies for facilitating the application and the evaluation of clinical reasoning skills.

Keywords:
Innovative educational intervention; A quasi-experimental study; Clinical reasoning
Repository Posting Date:
13-May-2014
Date of Publication:
13-May-2014
Conference Date:
2014
Conference Name:
Nursing Education Research Conference 2014
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursing; National League of Nursing
Conference Location:
Indianapolis, Indiana, USA
Description:
Nursing Education Research Conference 2014 Theme: Nursing Education Research, held in Hyatt Regency Indianapolis
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription.  Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_GB
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_GB
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleAn Innovative Educational Approach to Facilitating Student Nurses' Clinical Reasoning Skills Development in Indonesia: A Quasi-Experimental Studyen_GB
dc.contributor.authorYauri, Indrianien_GB
dc.contributor.departmentNon-memberen_GB
dc.author.detailsIndriani Yauri, MN, RN, email: ijauri@yahoo.comen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/316874-
dc.description.abstract<p>Poster presented on: Friday, April 4, 2014, Saturday, April 5, 2014</p><p><b>Introduction: </b>Developing clinical judgment is one of top three training needs identified for nurses in North Sulawesi regions, Indonesia [1].Accordingly, curricula and teaching approaches that facilitate the development of skills which underpin nurses’ clinical judgment, such as clinical reasoning skills are of prime importance to enable graduates to provide effective care. This study aims to examine the effect of the educational package on students’ attitudes regarding clinical reasoning. <p style="text-align: justify;" class="MsoNormalCxSpMiddle"><span> </span><p style="text-align: justify;"><b>Methods: </b>A sample of 85 nursing students in the high-risk pregnancy subject was recruited in a quasi-experimental design study. The Indonesian version of <i>California Critical Thinking Disposition Inventory</i> <b>(CCTDI) </b>(Cronbach’s alpha 0.90) [2] was used to collect data on pre- and post a 6-week Educational Intervention <b>(EI).</b> Both Independent and paired sample t-tests were conducted and <i>eta squared</i> effect size <b>(ES)</b> was identified. A significant level of <i>p</i><0.05 was employed. <p style="text-align: justify;"><b>Results: </b>At Time 2<b> </b>there was no statistically significant difference between the <i>overall</i> CCTDI scores for the intervention <b>(IG)</b> and control groups <b>(IG)</b> (<i>p</i>=.40). The ES was very small (eta squared = .008). However, the IG scored significantly higher than the CG on the <b><i>Systematicity</i></b> sub-scale (<i>p</i>=.006). A moderate ES (eta squared = .08) was identified. The scores of IG and CG were significantly higher on the <b><i>Truth-seeking</i> </b>sub-<span lang="EN-US">scale: IG (<i>p =</i>. 02) and CG: (<i>p =</i>. 008) and, although not statistically significant, the Confidence in Reasoning scores increased for the IG but decreased for the CG. </span><p style="text-align: justify;"><b>Conclusion: </b>This study highlights the complexities involved in examining clinical reasoning skills. Although the CCTDI can measure some students’ attitudes regarding clinical reasoning, It is imperative to employ more specific clinical reasoning measurement tools to gather more inclusive results. <p style="text-align: justify;"><b>Implication: </b>The results will make a significant and unique contribution to knowledge about educational strategies for facilitating the application and the evaluation of clinical reasoning skills.en_GB
dc.subjectInnovative educational interventionen_GB
dc.subjectA quasi-experimental studyen_GB
dc.subjectClinical reasoningen_GB
dc.date.available2014-05-13T16:44:29Z-
dc.date.issued2014-05-13-
dc.date.accessioned2014-05-13T16:44:29Z-
dc.conference.date2014en_GB
dc.conference.nameNursing Education Research Conference 2014en_GB
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursingen_GB
dc.conference.hostNational League of Nursingen_GB
dc.conference.locationIndianapolis, Indiana, USAen_GB
dc.descriptionNursing Education Research Conference 2014 Theme: Nursing Education Research, held in Hyatt Regency Indianapolisen_GB
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription.  Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published articleen_GB
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