Health Literacy Inclusion in Undergraduate Nursing Education: Integrative Review

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/316876
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Health Literacy Inclusion in Undergraduate Nursing Education: Integrative Review
Author(s):
French, Kempa (Kim)
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Nu Phi
Author Details:
Kempa (Kim) French, MSN, FNP-BC, email: frenchk@apsu.edu
Abstract:

Session presented on: Saturday, April 5, 2014, Friday, April 4, 2014

A major nursing responsibility is to educate patients with diverse literacy levels using understandable health communication. Inadequate or poorly communicated health information may adversely impacts patient-provider interactions and health outcomes.  The purpose of this integrative review was to evaluate support for and inclusion of health literacy evidence based practices in undergraduate nursing education using Whittemore and Knafl’s integrative review methodology.  Search strategies included general, health related and educational computerized database searches, ancestry reference review and use of expert recommendations.  The keywords “literacy”, “health”, “nurs*”, “education” and “student” were used for the primary search. A review of 159 relevant abstracts was refined to analyze eight primary nursing education studies:  three descriptive surveys, two quasi-experimental and three qualitative phenomenological reports. Health literacy definitions, health literacy inclusion, population characteristics, research design, student and patient outcomes and implications were extracted for comparison.  Four subthemes emerged: curricular access, course content application, student engagement in learning and patient involvement in self care. Integration of health information appear to be minimally represented in baccalaureate nursing curriculum and course content. Content assessment occured through specialized projects or in senior level  courses at the baccalaureate level.  Functional health literacy information was used to characterize current health literacy course content.  Students were engaged in functional health literacy interventions to increase patient health knowledge with improved patient self-care as the goal. None of the studies linked direct measurements of improvements in patient outcomes to student health literacy knowledge or practices.
Inconsistencies in health literacy knowledge and nursing education practice may limit the effectiveness of future nurses as communicators, patient educators and advocates. Increased inclusion of health literacy quantity and quality throughout nursing education should occur to bolster nursing student knowledge and evidence based practice. The impact of student interventions on patient outcomes and health care quality should be evaluated to determine areas for improving health literacy inclusion in current and future nursing educational practices.
Keywords:
Health literacy; Undergraduate nurse
Repository Posting Date:
13-May-2014
Date of Publication:
13-May-2014
Conference Date:
2014
Conference Name:
Nursing Education Research Conference 2014
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursing; National League of Nursing
Conference Location:
Indianapolis, Indiana, USA
Description:
Nursing Education Research Conference 2014 Theme: Nursing Education Research, held in Hyatt Regency Indianapolis
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription.  Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_GB
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_GB
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleHealth Literacy Inclusion in Undergraduate Nursing Education: Integrative Reviewen_GB
dc.contributor.authorFrench, Kempa (Kim)en_GB
dc.contributor.departmentNu Phien_GB
dc.author.detailsKempa (Kim) French, MSN, FNP-BC, email: frenchk@apsu.eduen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/316876-
dc.description.abstract<p>Session presented on: Saturday, April 5, 2014, Friday, April 4, 2014</p>A major nursing responsibility is to educate patients with diverse literacy levels using understandable health communication. Inadequate or poorly communicated health information may adversely impacts patient-provider interactions and health outcomes.  The purpose of this integrative review was to evaluate support for and inclusion of health literacy evidence based practices in undergraduate nursing education using Whittemore and Knafl’s integrative review methodology.  Search strategies included general, health related and educational computerized database searches, ancestry reference review and use of expert recommendations.  The keywords “literacy”, “health”, “nurs*”, “education” and “student” were used for the primary search. A review of 159 relevant abstracts was refined to analyze eight primary nursing education studies:  three descriptive surveys, two quasi-experimental and three qualitative phenomenological reports. Health literacy definitions, health literacy inclusion, population characteristics, research design, student and patient outcomes and implications were extracted for comparison.  Four subthemes emerged: curricular access, course content application, student engagement in learning and patient involvement in self care. Integration of health information appear to be minimally represented in baccalaureate nursing curriculum and course content. Content assessment occured through specialized projects or in senior level  courses at the baccalaureate level.  Functional health literacy information was used to characterize current health literacy course content.  Students were engaged in functional health literacy interventions to increase patient health knowledge with improved patient self-care as the goal. None of the studies linked direct measurements of improvements in patient outcomes to student health literacy knowledge or practices.<br /="/">Inconsistencies in health literacy knowledge and nursing education practice may limit the effectiveness of future nurses as communicators, patient educators and advocates. Increased inclusion of health literacy quantity and quality throughout nursing education should occur to bolster nursing student knowledge and evidence based practice. The impact of student interventions on patient outcomes and health care quality should be evaluated to determine areas for improving health literacy inclusion in current and future nursing educational practices.en_GB
dc.subjectHealth literacyen_GB
dc.subjectUndergraduate nurseen_GB
dc.date.available2014-05-13T16:44:32Z-
dc.date.issued2014-05-13-
dc.date.accessioned2014-05-13T16:44:32Z-
dc.conference.date2014en_GB
dc.conference.nameNursing Education Research Conference 2014en_GB
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursingen_GB
dc.conference.hostNational League of Nursingen_GB
dc.conference.locationIndianapolis, Indiana, USAen_GB
dc.descriptionNursing Education Research Conference 2014 Theme: Nursing Education Research, held in Hyatt Regency Indianapolisen_GB
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription.  Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published articleen_GB
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