2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/316878
Category:
Full-text
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Faculty Perceptions of Nurse Educator Certification
Author(s):
Barbé, Tammy Diane
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Pi Gamma
Author Details:
Tammy Diane Barbé, PhD, RN, CNE, email: barbe_td@mercer.edu
Abstract:

Session presented on: Friday, April 4, 2014

Certification is designed to protect the public, recognize and encourage professional achievement, and enhance professionalism. While certification of nurses in areas of clinical specialty has existed for almost 40 years, certification of nurse educators is less than a decade old. While clinical certification of nurses has been linked to improved patient outcomes, it is unknown whether nurse educator certification leads to better student and faculty outcomes. A pilot study was conducted to investigate perceptions regarding nurse educator certification among nursing faculty and to adapt an existing survey tool (Perceived Value of Certification Tool©) to examine perceived value of nurse educator certification. The tool was administered to nursing faculty at a southeast University. Eighty-three percent of the faculty responded.  Internal consistency reliability of the 24 item tool was reported as a Cronbach’s alpha of .945. The value statements that faculty most agreed with included: validates specialized knowledge, provides personal satisfaction, and enhances feeling of personal accomplishment. Faculty agreed least with the following statements: increases salary, increases consumer confidence, and promotes recognition from other health professionals. Participants identified multiple barriers to certification. The time to prepare for the examination, lack of qualifications, and limited knowledge of the benefit of certification were common themes. Those already certified in a clinical specialty did not see the benefit in a second certification. Financial support was identified as the greatest facilitator.  Seventy-three percent of the participants were more willing to take the certification exam if the initial testing fee was reimbursed by the institution. These findings are consistent with prior research of perceived value of certification in clinical nursing specialties.
Keywords:
certification; faculty development
Repository Posting Date:
13-May-2014
Date of Publication:
13-May-2014
Conference Date:
2014
Conference Name:
Nursing Education Research Conference 2014
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursing; National League of Nursing
Conference Location:
Indianapolis, Indiana, USA
Description:
Nursing Education Research Conference 2014 Theme: Nursing Education Research, held in Hyatt Regency Indianapolis

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_GB
dc.type.categoryFull-texten_GB
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleFaculty Perceptions of Nurse Educator Certificationen_GB
dc.contributor.authorBarbé, Tammy Dianeen_GB
dc.contributor.departmentPi Gammaen_GB
dc.author.detailsTammy Diane Barbé, PhD, RN, CNE, email: barbe_td@mercer.eduen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/316878-
dc.description.abstract<p>Session presented on: Friday, April 4, 2014</p>Certification is designed to protect the public, recognize and encourage professional achievement, and enhance professionalism. While certification of nurses in areas of clinical specialty has existed for almost 40 years, certification of nurse educators is less than a decade old. While clinical certification of nurses has been linked to improved patient outcomes, it is unknown whether nurse educator certification leads to better student and faculty outcomes. A pilot study was conducted to investigate perceptions regarding nurse educator certification among nursing faculty and to adapt an existing survey tool (Perceived Value of Certification Tool©) to examine perceived value of nurse educator certification. The tool was administered to nursing faculty at a southeast University. Eighty-three percent of the faculty responded.  Internal consistency reliability of the 24 item tool was reported as a Cronbach’s alpha of .945. The value statements that faculty most agreed with included: validates specialized knowledge, provides personal satisfaction, and enhances feeling of personal accomplishment. Faculty agreed least with the following statements: increases salary, increases consumer confidence, and promotes recognition from other health professionals. Participants identified multiple barriers to certification. The time to prepare for the examination, lack of qualifications, and limited knowledge of the benefit of certification were common themes. Those already certified in a clinical specialty did not see the benefit in a second certification. Financial support was identified as the greatest facilitator.  Seventy-three percent of the participants were more willing to take the certification exam if the initial testing fee was reimbursed by the institution. These findings are consistent with prior research of perceived value of certification in clinical nursing specialties.en_GB
dc.subjectcertificationen_GB
dc.subjectfaculty developmenten_GB
dc.date.available2014-05-13T16:44:35Z-
dc.date.issued2014-05-13-
dc.date.accessioned2014-05-13T16:44:35Z-
dc.conference.date2014en_GB
dc.conference.nameNursing Education Research Conference 2014en_GB
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursingen_GB
dc.conference.hostNational League of Nursingen_GB
dc.conference.locationIndianapolis, Indiana, USAen_GB
dc.descriptionNursing Education Research Conference 2014 Theme: Nursing Education Research, held in Hyatt Regency Indianapolisen_GB
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