2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/316880
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Cultural Bias Education of Nursing Faculty
Author(s):
Castelblanco, F.
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Non-member
Author Details:
F. Castelblanco, DNP, email: frank.castelblanco@msj.org
Abstract:

Poster presented on: Friday, April 4, 2014, Saturday, April 5, 2014

Census reports indicate that the United States population is rapidly growing and is currently comprised of more than 150 diverse ethnic groups of people from other nations and cultures. The increase in the diversity of cultures in the U.S. population poses two major questions for health care; how to provide care that is culturally sensitive and effective and why is important to do so? Nurses, about 2.3 million, comprise the largest component of the health care workforce. The need for cultural competence training in nursing education is evident, and although certain measures have been initiated, very few are focused on those providing nursing education, the nursing faculty. A cultural bias education seminar was presented to nursing faculty at a private university in Western North Carolina in an attempt to increase the level of cultural competence. Leininger’s “Culture Care and Universality”; a nursing theory was used as the theoretical framework for the project and Campinha-Bacote’s Inventory for Assessing the Process of Cultural Competency Among Healthcare Professionals, Revised (IAPCC-R) was employed to measure the pre- and post-cultural competence levels of the nursing faculty.  The faculty voluntarily completed the pre-assessment, the seminar was completed and 17 participants completed the post assessment.   The statistical findings illustrated an increase in total cultural competence from a pre-intervention mean of 67.5 (SD=7.29) or culturally aware, to a post intervention mean of 74.53 (SD=9.24) or culturally competent. The findings proved to be statistically significant (level of significance α = 0.05) with a p value of 0.01. There was an eight-fold increase in the number of nursing faculty deemed culturally competent in the post assessment as measured by the IAPCC-R.
Keywords:
Cultural Competence; Nursing Faculty Education; Cultural Bias
Repository Posting Date:
13-May-2014
Date of Publication:
13-May-2014
Conference Date:
2014
Conference Name:
Nursing Education Research Conference 2014
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursing; National League of Nursing
Conference Location:
Indianapolis, Indiana, USA
Description:
Nursing Education Research Conference 2014 Theme: Nursing Education Research, held in Hyatt Regency Indianapolis
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription.  Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_GB
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_GB
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleCultural Bias Education of Nursing Facultyen_GB
dc.contributor.authorCastelblanco, F.en_GB
dc.contributor.departmentNon-memberen_GB
dc.author.detailsF. Castelblanco, DNP, email: frank.castelblanco@msj.orgen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/316880-
dc.description.abstract<p>Poster presented on: Friday, April 4, 2014, Saturday, April 5, 2014</p>Census reports indicate that the United States population is rapidly growing and is currently comprised of more than 150 diverse ethnic groups of people from other nations and cultures. The increase in the diversity of cultures in the U.S. population poses two major questions for health care; how to provide care that is culturally sensitive and effective and why is important to do so? Nurses, about 2.3 million, comprise the largest component of the health care workforce. The need for cultural competence training in nursing education is evident, and although certain measures have been initiated, very few are focused on those providing nursing education, the nursing faculty. A cultural bias education seminar was presented to nursing faculty at a private university in Western North Carolina in an attempt to increase the level of cultural competence. Leininger’s “Culture Care and Universality”; a nursing theory was used as the theoretical framework for the project and Campinha-Bacote’s Inventory for Assessing the Process of Cultural Competency Among Healthcare Professionals, Revised (IAPCC-R) was employed to measure the pre- and post-cultural competence levels of the nursing faculty.  The faculty voluntarily completed the pre-assessment, the seminar was completed and 17 participants completed the post assessment.   The statistical findings illustrated an increase in total cultural competence from a pre-intervention mean of 67.5 (SD=7.29) or culturally aware, to a post intervention mean of 74.53 (SD=9.24) or culturally competent. The findings proved to be statistically significant (level of significance α = 0.05) with a p value of 0.01. There was an eight-fold increase in the number of nursing faculty deemed culturally competent in the post assessment as measured by the IAPCC-R.en_GB
dc.subjectCultural Competenceen_GB
dc.subjectNursing Faculty Educationen_GB
dc.subjectCultural Biasen_GB
dc.date.available2014-05-13T16:44:36Z-
dc.date.issued2014-05-13-
dc.date.accessioned2014-05-13T16:44:36Z-
dc.conference.date2014en_GB
dc.conference.nameNursing Education Research Conference 2014en_GB
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursingen_GB
dc.conference.hostNational League of Nursingen_GB
dc.conference.locationIndianapolis, Indiana, USAen_GB
dc.descriptionNursing Education Research Conference 2014 Theme: Nursing Education Research, held in Hyatt Regency Indianapolisen_GB
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription.  Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published articleen_GB
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