Impact of Violence Aganist Nurses in Health Care Environments and Legal Implications

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/316885
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Impact of Violence Aganist Nurses in Health Care Environments and Legal Implications
Author(s):
McKoy, Yvonne
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Non-member
Author Details:
Yvonne McKoy, PhD, MSN, BSN, RN, email: ydmckoy@ncat.edu
Abstract:

Session presented on: Friday, April 4, 2014

Background: On February 11, 2009 shots rang out in the School of Nursing at the University of Arizona. As the smoke from the triggerman's gun cleared, three professors lay dead. All three of these victims were murdered at the hands of one of their students, Robert Flores,  a Gulf War veteran. Anyone can become the victim of of a workplace assault, but risks are greater in certain occupations such as nursing---nursing educators and students are not immune. The investigation of violence toward health care workers, especially nurses, continues to be relatively new and remains underreported. In 2009, there were a reported 2,050 nonfatal assaults and violent acts against nurses. Experts report that the risk of verbal and physical violence continues to increase across diverse types of healthcare settings.

Purpose: This research added to the data related to violence against nurses and decribes the incidence, short and long-term effects, and legal implications of violence against nurses by patients.

Methods: The sample included 108 randomly selected nurses living in Kentcky, Indiana, and Ohio who were members of the International Association of Forensic Nurses. Participants completed a comprehensive Assault Survey & Assessment Tool developed by the SHARP team of the Department of Labor and Industries in Washington State and Dr. Marilyn Lanza in the Department of Nursing Service for Research at the Edith Nourse Rogers Memorial Veterans Hospital in Bedford, Massachusetts.

Results: Of the total number of nurses who compleed the survey, 88 (81%) reported patient violence; the majority of these nurses experienced some type of physical violence while a signficant number reported emotional or psychological symptoms.

Implications: At a time when there is a shortage of nurses and a number of nurses leaving the profession, increased support and awareness of victimization is paramount. If nurses are being educated for healthcare workplaces, how much information is included in the curriculums of nursing programs regarding violence and victimization?

Keywords:
Violence; Impact of violence
Repository Posting Date:
13-May-2014
Date of Publication:
13-May-2014
Conference Date:
2014
Conference Name:
Nursing Education Research Conference 2014
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursing; National League of Nursing
Conference Location:
Indianapolis, Indiana, USA
Description:
Nursing Education Research Conference 2014 Theme: Nursing Education Research, held in Hyatt Regency Indianapolis
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription.  Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_GB
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_GB
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleImpact of Violence Aganist Nurses in Health Care Environments and Legal Implicationsen_GB
dc.contributor.authorMcKoy, Yvonneen_GB
dc.contributor.departmentNon-memberen_GB
dc.author.detailsYvonne McKoy, PhD, MSN, BSN, RN, email: ydmckoy@ncat.eduen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/316885-
dc.description.abstract<p>Session presented on: Friday, April 4, 2014</p>Background: On February 11, 2009 shots rang out in the School of Nursing at the University of Arizona. As the smoke from the triggerman's gun cleared, three professors lay dead. All three of these victims were murdered at the hands of one of their students, Robert Flores,  a Gulf War veteran. Anyone can become the victim of of a workplace assault, but risks are greater in certain occupations such as nursing---nursing educators and students are not immune. The investigation of violence toward health care workers, especially nurses, continues to be relatively new and remains underreported. In 2009, there were a reported 2,050 nonfatal assaults and violent acts against nurses. Experts report that the risk of verbal and physical violence continues to increase across diverse types of healthcare settings. <p>Purpose: This research added to the data related to violence against nurses and decribes the incidence, short and long-term effects, and legal implications of violence against nurses by patients. <p>Methods: The sample included 108 randomly selected nurses living in Kentcky, Indiana, and Ohio who were members of the International Association of Forensic Nurses. Participants completed a comprehensive Assault Survey & Assessment Tool developed by the SHARP team of the Department of Labor and Industries in Washington State and Dr. Marilyn Lanza in the Department of Nursing Service for Research at the Edith Nourse Rogers Memorial Veterans Hospital in Bedford, Massachusetts. <p>Results: Of the total number of nurses who compleed the survey, 88 (81%) reported patient violence; the majority of these nurses experienced some type of physical violence while a signficant number reported emotional or psychological symptoms. <p>Implications: At a time when there is a shortage of nurses and a number of nurses leaving the profession, increased support and awareness of victimization is paramount. If nurses are being educated for healthcare workplaces, how much information is included in the curriculums of nursing programs regarding violence and victimization?en_GB
dc.subjectViolenceen_GB
dc.subjectImpact of violenceen_GB
dc.date.available2014-05-13T16:44:43Z-
dc.date.issued2014-05-13-
dc.date.accessioned2014-05-13T16:44:43Z-
dc.conference.date2014en_GB
dc.conference.nameNursing Education Research Conference 2014en_GB
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursingen_GB
dc.conference.hostNational League of Nursingen_GB
dc.conference.locationIndianapolis, Indiana, USAen_GB
dc.descriptionNursing Education Research Conference 2014 Theme: Nursing Education Research, held in Hyatt Regency Indianapolisen_GB
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription.  Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published articleen_GB
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.