Assessment of Nursing Faculty Development Needs: An Evidence-Based Approach

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/316887
Category:
Full-text
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Assessment of Nursing Faculty Development Needs: An Evidence-Based Approach
Author(s):
Reilly, Margaret Joyce
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Alpha Phi
Author Details:
Margaret Joyce Reilly, DNS, APRN, CNE, email: margaret.reilly@mail.cuny.edu
Abstract:

Session presented on: Friday, April 4, 2014

As the largest public university in the country, the City University of New York graduates over 1000 nurses each year and is the largest supplier of registered nurses in the New York metropolitan area. This culturally diverse pool of qualified nurses is educated to provide quality health care to the broad spectrum of the population. Comprised of twelve schools of nursing spanning the range from LPN to PhD, CUNY nursing schools employ over 400 nursing faculty both full time and adjunct. Like many nursing programs across the country, it is experiencing a nursing faculty shortage, which is anticipated to grow, as older faculty retire. Many new faculty come from the ranks of the clinical preceptors and adjuncts. However, clinical expertise is often not sufficient to transition to the role of nurse educator, and many graduate programs do not address the educator role. It has been reported nationally, that junior faculty have high rates of job dissatisfaction, which can impact retention and recruitment of limited faculty. As well, faculty shortages are often cited as major reason for turning away thousands of potential nursing students each year. Additionally, with changes in health care delivery, technological advancements, and demands for scholarship and  research, even experienced faculty are in need of new knowledge and skills. Not unlike many other academic institutions, the university does not have a central, formalized nursing faculty development program to recruit and support new and experienced faculty in their transition to the role of educator, researcher or scholar.  This paper describes the experience of researching, developing and implementing a faculty development needs assessment survey among the nursing faculty of this large urban, publicly funded university. Findings are reported and recommendations made for addressing professional development.
Keywords:
Needs Assessment; Faculty Development
Repository Posting Date:
13-May-2014
Date of Publication:
13-May-2014
Conference Date:
2014
Conference Name:
Nursing Education Research Conference 2014
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursing; National League of Nursing
Conference Location:
Indianapolis, Indiana, USA
Description:
Nursing Education Research Conference 2014 Theme: Nursing Education Research, held in Hyatt Regency Indianapolis

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_GB
dc.type.categoryFull-texten_GB
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleAssessment of Nursing Faculty Development Needs: An Evidence-Based Approachen_GB
dc.contributor.authorReilly, Margaret Joyceen_GB
dc.contributor.departmentAlpha Phien_GB
dc.author.detailsMargaret Joyce Reilly, DNS, APRN, CNE, email: margaret.reilly@mail.cuny.eduen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/316887-
dc.description.abstract<p>Session presented on: Friday, April 4, 2014</p>As the largest public university in the country, the City University of New York graduates over 1000 nurses each year and is the largest supplier of registered nurses in the New York metropolitan area. This culturally diverse pool of qualified nurses is educated to provide quality health care to the broad spectrum of the population. Comprised of twelve schools of nursing spanning the range from LPN to PhD, CUNY nursing schools employ over 400 nursing faculty both full time and adjunct. Like many nursing programs across the country, it is experiencing a nursing faculty shortage, which is anticipated to grow, as older faculty retire. Many new faculty come from the ranks of the clinical preceptors and adjuncts. However, clinical expertise is often not sufficient to transition to the role of nurse educator, and many graduate programs do not address the educator role. It has been reported nationally, that junior faculty have high rates of job dissatisfaction, which can impact retention and recruitment of limited faculty. As well, faculty shortages are often cited as major reason for turning away thousands of potential nursing students each year. Additionally, with changes in health care delivery, technological advancements, and demands for scholarship and  research, even experienced faculty are in need of new knowledge and skills. Not unlike many other academic institutions, the university does not have a central, formalized nursing faculty development program to recruit and support new and experienced faculty in their transition to the role of educator, researcher or scholar.  This paper describes the experience of researching, developing and implementing a faculty development needs assessment survey among the nursing faculty of this large urban, publicly funded university. Findings are reported and recommendations made for addressing professional development.en_GB
dc.subjectNeeds Assessmenten_GB
dc.subjectFaculty Developmenten_GB
dc.date.available2014-05-13T16:44:46Z-
dc.date.issued2014-05-13-
dc.date.accessioned2014-05-13T16:44:46Z-
dc.conference.date2014en_GB
dc.conference.nameNursing Education Research Conference 2014en_GB
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau International, the Honor Society of Nursingen_GB
dc.conference.hostNational League of Nursingen_GB
dc.conference.locationIndianapolis, Indiana, USAen_GB
dc.descriptionNursing Education Research Conference 2014 Theme: Nursing Education Research, held in Hyatt Regency Indianapolisen_GB
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