2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/316891
Category:
Full-text
Type:
DNP Capstone Project
Level of Evidence:
Systematic Review
Research Approach:
Other
Title:
Telehospice: A Systematic Review
Author(s):
Umberger, Paul
Additional Author Information:
FNP-C, paul.umberger@nau.edu
Advisors:
Dunn, Dorothy; Allchin, Lynn
Degree:
DNP
Degree Year:
2014
Grantor:
Northern Arizona University
Abstract:

Purpose

A review of the literature was conducted in order to identify, appraise, and report on the use of telehospice in patient care.  Questions addressed in the review were, what is the current state of telehospice practice, who is using telehospice technology, and how is it being utilized in patient care?

 

Methodology

Inclusion criteria for the review were articles concerning hospice care providers, patients and family caregivers involved with telehospice.  Telehospice interventions for patient care were included in the review.  Editorial reviews and commentaries concerning telehospice were excluded for review.   Search strings were designed to identify telehospice use and applications.    A total of 78 searches were run in 12 databases using search strings with MeSH typology.    Data limiters for the searches were peer reviewed articles in English with the range from 1988 to 2013.  The grey literature was searched using an ancestry approach.

 

Results

Using a PRISMA technique, the literature searches yielded 229 articles from the databases and the ancestry search of the literature.  There were 125 articles excluded for reasons such as articles were duplicates, policy analysis, commentaries or not relating to telehospice technology and patient care.  There were 104 full text articles concerning telehospice that were assessed for review eligibility with 80 of these articles excluded.  There were a total of 25 articles included in the review.  The 25 articles were published in 18 different journals indicating little possibility of journal bias.  The review reflects telehospice use in the U.S. and the United Kingdom. 

 

Implications for Practice

It is clear that the practice of telehospice has relevance for patient care at the end of life.  Telehospice has the potential to decrease patient and caregiver isolation during the dying process.  Telehospice has the potential for hospice agencies to decrease costs and travel time and allow staff to monitor patients in a timely fashion. Telehospice technologies are significant tools for the delivery of future hospice care.  The next evolution for telehospice care may be translational research such as developing an iPad application incorporating patient self-reporting using a standardized end of life assessment and conducting a pilot study.  Interdisciplinary research and practice, makes it feasible to develop hardware and software technology that can be incorporated into end of life patient care with measurable patient benefits.   

 

Keywords:
Telehospice; Telemedicine; Hospice; End of life; Systematic Review
MeSH:
Telemedicine; Hospice and Palliative Care Nursing; Terminal Care
Note:
This work has been approved through a faculty review process prior to its posting in the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository.
Repository Posting Date:
2014-05-13T16:47:13Z
Date of Publication:
2014-05-13

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.advisorDunn, Dorothy-
dc.contributor.advisorAllchin, Lynn-
dc.contributor.authorUmberger, Paul-
dc.date.accessioned2014-05-13T16:47:13Z-
dc.date.available2014-05-13T16:47:13Z-
dc.date.issued2014-05-13-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/316891-
dc.description.abstract<p align="center"><strong>Purpose</strong></p> <p>A review of the literature was conducted in order to identify, appraise, and report on the use of telehospice in patient care.  Questions addressed in the review were, what is the current state of telehospice practice, who is using telehospice technology, and how is it being utilized in patient care?</p> <p><strong> </strong></p> <p align="center"><strong>Methodology</strong></p> <p>Inclusion criteria for the review were articles concerning hospice care providers, patients and family caregivers involved with telehospice.  Telehospice interventions for patient care were included in the review.  Editorial reviews and commentaries concerning telehospice were excluded for review.   Search strings were designed to identify telehospice use and applications.    A total of 78 searches were run in 12 databases using search strings with MeSH typology.    Data limiters for the searches were peer reviewed articles in English with the range from 1988 to 2013.  The grey literature was searched using an ancestry approach. <strong></strong></p> <p align="center"><strong> </strong></p> <p align="center"><strong>Results</strong></p> <p>Using a PRISMA technique, the literature searches yielded 229 articles from the databases and the ancestry search of the literature.  There were 125 articles excluded for reasons such as articles were duplicates, policy analysis, commentaries or not relating to telehospice technology and patient care.  There were 104 full text articles concerning telehospice that were assessed for review eligibility with 80 of these articles excluded.  There were a total of 25 articles included in the review.  The 25 articles were published in 18 different journals indicating little possibility of journal bias.  The review reflects telehospice use in the U.S. and the United Kingdom. </p> <p><strong> </strong></p> <p align="center"><strong>Implications for Practice</strong></p> <p>It is clear that the practice of telehospice has relevance for patient care at the end of life.  Telehospice has the potential to decrease patient and caregiver isolation during the dying process.  Telehospice has the potential for hospice agencies to decrease costs and travel time and allow staff to monitor patients in a timely fashion. Telehospice technologies are significant tools for the delivery of future hospice care.  The next evolution for telehospice care may be translational research such as developing an iPad application incorporating patient self-reporting using a standardized end of life assessment and conducting a pilot study.  Interdisciplinary research and practice, makes it feasible to develop hardware and software technology that can be incorporated into end of life patient care with measurable patient benefits.   </p> <p><strong> </strong></p>en_GB
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.rightsAn error occurred on the license name.*
dc.rightsAn error occurred on the license name.*
dc.rights.uriAn error occurred getting the license - uri.*
dc.rights.uriAn error occurred getting the license - uri.*
dc.subjectTelehospiceen_GB
dc.subjectTelemedicineen_GB
dc.subjectHospiceen_GB
dc.subjectEnd of lifeen_GB
dc.subjectSystematic Reviewen_GB
dc.subject.meshTelemedicineen_GB
dc.subject.meshHospice and Palliative Care Nursingen_GB
dc.subject.meshTerminal Careen_GB
dc.titleTelehospice: A Systematic Reviewen_US
dc.typeDNP Capstone Projecten
thesis.degree.grantorNorthern Arizona Universityen_GB
thesis.degree.levelDNPen
dc.description.noteThis work has been approved through a faculty review process prior to its posting in the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository.-
dc.primary-author.detailsFNP-C, paul.umberger@nau.eduen_GB
thesis.degree.year2014en
dc.type.categoryFull-texten_GB
dc.evidence.levelSystematic Reviewen
dc.research.approachOtheren
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