Using the Thai-Human Papilloma Virus Belief Scale to Tailor Messages to Eligible Women: A Text Message Intervention

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/317388
Category:
Full-text
Type:
DNP Capstone Project
Level of Evidence:
Outcomes Research
Research Approach:
Pilot/Exploratory Study
Title:
Using the Thai-Human Papilloma Virus Belief Scale to Tailor Messages to Eligible Women: A Text Message Intervention
Author(s):
Picone, Mary Ann
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Non-member
Abstract:

Women ages 18 to 26 have the highest prevalence of human papillomavirus (HPV) disease in the United States as well as worldwide, and in particular, women ages 20 to 24 years (Taylor, Hariri, Sternberg, Dunne & Markowitz, 2011). Ratanasiripong (2012) found that HPV vaccine rates have increased since the introduction of the Gardasil vaccine by Merck in 2006 from between 5 percent in one sample in 2007 to as high as 49 percent of college-aged women receiving at least one dose. The research question for this project was the following

Do women aged 18 to 26 years perceive themselves at risk for HPV disease and do they have the intentions to receive the HPV vaccine series as determined by Thai Human Papillomavirus Vaccine Belief Scale (Thai-HPVBS)? The Thai-HPVBS bases its questions upon the constructs in the Health Belief Model (Rosenstock, 1966) which examines variables which influence health behavior. In their roles as primary care providers nurse practitioners are able to provide the cue to action for women aged 18 to 26 years to consider receiving the HPV vaccine series. Understanding the intentions of women, aged 18 to 26 years guided the nurse practitioner in this project to design a text message educational intervention for the sample population. There were no significant findings.

Keywords:
human papillomavirus (HPV); Thai Human Papillomavirus Vaccine Belief Scale
MeSH:
Papillomavirus Infections; Papillomavirus Vaccines; Health Behavior
Repository Posting Date:
23-May-2014
Date of Publication:
23-May-2014
Sponsors:
Temple University Women's Education Fund
Note:
This work has been approved through a peer-review process prior to its posting in the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.type.categoryFull-texten
dc.typeDNP Capstone Projecten
dc.evidence.levelOutcomes Researchen
dc.research.approachPilot/Exploratory Studyen
dc.titleUsing the Thai-Human Papilloma Virus Belief Scale to Tailor Messages to Eligible Women: A Text Message Interventionen_US
dc.contributor.authorPicone, Mary Ann-
dc.contributor.departmentNon-memberen
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/317388-
dc.description.abstract<p><span style="font-size: small; font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif;">Women ages 18 to 26 have the highest prevalence of human papillomavirus (HPV) disease in the United States as well as worldwide, and in particular, women ages 20 to 24 years (Taylor, Hariri, Sternberg, Dunne &amp; Markowitz, 2011). Ratanasiripong (2012) found that HPV vaccine rates have increased since the introduction of the Gardasil vaccine by Merck in 2006 from between 5 percent in one sample in 2007 to as high as 49 percent of college-aged women receiving at least one dose. The research question for this project was the following</span></p> <p><span style="font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: small;">Do women aged 18 to 26 years perceive themselves at risk for HPV disease and do they have the intentions to receive the HPV vaccine series as determined by Thai Human Papillomavirus Vaccine Belief Scale (Thai-HPVBS)? The Thai-HPVBS bases its questions upon the constructs in the Health Belief Model (Rosenstock, 1966) which examines variables which influence health behavior. In their roles as primary care providers nurse practitioners are able to provide the cue to action for women aged 18 to 26 years to consider receiving the HPV vaccine series. Understanding the intentions of women, aged 18 to 26 years guided the nurse practitioner in this project to design a text message educational intervention for the sample population. There were no significant findings. <em><em></em></em></span></p>en_GB
dc.subjecthuman papillomavirus (HPV)en_GB
dc.subjectThai Human Papillomavirus Vaccine Belief Scaleen_GB
dc.subject.meshPapillomavirus Infectionsen_US
dc.subject.meshPapillomavirus Vaccinesen_US
dc.subject.meshHealth Behavioren_US
dc.date.available2014-05-23T17:35:09Z-
dc.date.issued2014-05-23-
dc.date.accessioned2014-05-23T17:35:09Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipTemple University Women's Education Funden_GB
dc.description.noteThis work has been approved through a peer-review process prior to its posting in the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository.-
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