2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/318820
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Research Study
Level of Evidence:
Cross-Sectional Study
Research Approach:
Quantitative Research
Title:
Predictors of Fatigue in the Presence of Coronary Heart Disease
Author(s):
Eckhardt, Ann L.; DeVon, Holli A.; Piano, Mariann R.; Ryan, Catherine J.; Zerwic, Julie J.
Lead Author STTI Affiliation:
Theta Pi
Author Details:
Ann L. Eckhardt, PhD, RN, email: aeckhard@iwu.edu; Holli A. DeVon, PhD, RN, email: hdevon1@uic.edu; Mariann R. Piano, PhD, RN, email: piano@uic.edu; Catherine J. Ryan, PhD, RN, email: cryan4@uic.edu; Julie J. Zerwic, PhD, RN, email: juljohns@uic.edu
Abstract:

Background: Fatigue may be an important warning sign before an acute myocardial infarction (AMI).  Prior to establishing the importance of fatigue in AMI, it is critical to examine the presence of fatigue in stable coronary heart disease (CHD) patients.

Purpose: The purpose of this novel study was to describe and determine predictors of fatigue in stable CHD.

Method: Stable CHD patients (N = 102) were recruited from one urban and one rural cardiology clinic. Fatigue, depression, and health-related quality of life were measured with the Fatigue Symptom Inventory (FSI), Patient Health Questionnaire-9 (PHQ-9), and Short Form 36 (SF-36).

Results: The majority of subjects were men (64%), non-Hispanic White (56%), and high school graduates (83%).  Race, income, and education did not influence fatigue severity or interference from fatigue. Sixty-five percent of the sample reported clinically meaningful fatigue and 40% of subjects reported fatigue more than one-half the week with fatigue lasting more than one-half the day. Women reported more interference from fatigue (M = 3.28 ± 2.71) than men (M = 1.99 ± 2.03; t = 2.74, p < .01). Subjects whose PHQ-9 score was indicative of depression reported more interference from fatigue (M = 3.85 ± 2.37 vs. M = 1.26 ± 1.60; t = 6.55, p < .001) and higher levels of fatigue severity on the FSI and the SF-36 vitality subscale (p < .001) compared to those with no depression (PHQ-9 < 5). Depression was the sole predictor of FSI Interference scores (R2 = .43; p < .01) in a multivariate regression model with age, gender, and PHQ-9 scores. Though 46% of participants had a PHQ-9 score indicative of mild or major depression (PHQ-9 ≥ 5), only 12% of subjects had depression in their medical records.

Conclusion: The majority of stable CHD patients reported fatigue. This baseline fatigue needs to be accounted for when considering the symptoms of AMI.  Further research is needed to identify whether changes in fatigue can signal an impending acute event. Depression was not consistently documented in the medical record; therefore, it is imperative that healthcare providers ask about depressive symptoms in order to manage co-morbid symptoms. More research is needed to fully explore the influence of gender and depression on fatigue in this stable but high risk population.

Keywords:
fatigue; Coronary heart disease
Repository Posting Date:
4-Jun-2014
Date of Publication:
4-Jun-2014
Conference Date:
2013
Conference Name:
American Heart Association Scientific Sessions 2013
Conference Host:
American Heart Association
Conference Location:
Dallas, Texas, USA
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International
Description:
This abstract also appeared in the conference program book as Presentation 14281, Abstract Poster Session APS.205.03-Heart Failure Disease Management. Poster Board 2047. Presentation time: Monday, 19 November 2013, 9:30 AM - 11:00 AM.
Note:
The Sigma Theta Tau International grant application that funded this research, in whole or in part, was completed by the applicant and peer-reviewed prior to the award of the STTI grant. No further peer-review has taken place upon the completion of the STTI grant final report and its appearance in this repository.; This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.type.categoryAbstracten
dc.typeResearch Studyen
dc.evidence.levelCross-Sectional Studyen
dc.research.approachQuantitative Researchen
dc.titlePredictors of Fatigue in the Presence of Coronary Heart Diseaseen_US
dc.contributor.authorEckhardt, Ann L.-
dc.contributor.authorDeVon, Holli A.-
dc.contributor.authorPiano, Mariann R.-
dc.contributor.authorRyan, Catherine J.-
dc.contributor.authorZerwic, Julie J.-
dc.contributor.departmentTheta Pien
dc.author.detailsAnn L. Eckhardt, PhD, RN, email: aeckhard@iwu.edu; Holli A. DeVon, PhD, RN, email: hdevon1@uic.edu; Mariann R. Piano, PhD, RN, email: piano@uic.edu; Catherine J. Ryan, PhD, RN, email: cryan4@uic.edu; Julie J. Zerwic, PhD, RN, email: juljohns@uic.eduen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/318820-
dc.description.abstract<p><strong>Background:</strong> Fatigue may be an important warning sign before an acute myocardial infarction (AMI).  Prior to establishing the importance of fatigue in AMI, it is critical to examine the presence of fatigue in stable coronary heart disease (CHD) patients.</p> <p><strong>Purpose:</strong> The purpose of this novel study was to describe and determine predictors of fatigue in stable CHD.</p> <p><strong>Method:</strong> Stable CHD patients (N = 102) were recruited from one urban and one rural cardiology clinic. Fatigue, depression, and health-related quality of life were measured with the Fatigue Symptom Inventory (FSI), Patient Health Questionnaire-9 (PHQ-9), and Short Form 36 (SF-36).</p><p><strong>Results:</strong> The majority of subjects were men (64%), non-Hispanic White (56%), and high school graduates (83%).  Race, income, and education did not influence fatigue severity or interference from fatigue. Sixty-five percent of the sample reported clinically meaningful fatigue and 40% of subjects reported fatigue more than one-half the week with fatigue lasting more than one-half the day. Women reported more interference from fatigue (M = 3.28 ± 2.71) than men (M = 1.99 ± 2.03; <em>t</em> = 2.74, <em>p </em>< .01). Subjects whose PHQ-9 score was indicative of depression reported more interference from fatigue (M = 3.85 ± 2.37 vs. M = 1.26 ± 1.60; <em>t</em> = 6.55, <em>p</em> < .001) and higher levels of fatigue severity on the FSI and the SF-36 vitality subscale (<em>p</em> < .001) compared to those with no depression (PHQ-9 < 5). Depression was the sole predictor of FSI Interference scores (<em>R</em><sup>2</sup> = .43; p < .01) in a multivariate regression model with age, gender, and PHQ-9 scores. Though 46% of participants had a PHQ-9 score indicative of mild or major depression (PHQ-9 ≥ 5), only 12% of subjects had depression in their medical records.</p> <p><strong>Conclusion: </strong>The majority of stable CHD patients reported fatigue. This baseline fatigue needs to be accounted for when considering the symptoms of AMI.  Further research is needed to identify whether changes in fatigue can signal an impending acute event. Depression was not consistently documented in the medical record; therefore, it is imperative that healthcare providers ask about depressive symptoms in order to manage co-morbid symptoms. More research is needed to fully explore the influence of gender and depression on fatigue in this stable but high risk population.</p>en_GB
dc.subjectfatigueen_GB
dc.subjectCoronary heart diseaseen_GB
dc.date.available2014-06-04T18:03:20Z-
dc.date.issued2014-06-04-
dc.date.accessioned2014-06-04T18:03:20Z-
dc.conference.date2013en
dc.conference.nameAmerican Heart Association Scientific Sessions 2013en_GB
dc.conference.hostAmerican Heart Associationen_GB
dc.conference.locationDallas, Texas, USAen_GB
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_US
dc.descriptionThis abstract also appeared in the conference program book as Presentation 14281, Abstract Poster Session APS.205.03-Heart Failure Disease Management. Poster Board 2047. Presentation time: Monday, 19 November 2013, 9:30 AM - 11:00 AM.en_GB
dc.description.noteThe Sigma Theta Tau International grant application that funded this research, in whole or in part, was completed by the applicant and peer-reviewed prior to the award of the STTI grant. No further peer-review has taken place upon the completion of the STTI grant final report and its appearance in this repository.en
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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