2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/324144
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Emotional Intelligence and Lateral Violence in Nursing: A Correlation Study
Author(s):
Slagle, Tara; Fitch, Tammy
Author Details:
Tara Slagle, MSN, RN, email: taraslagle@gmail.com; Tammy Fitch
Abstract:
Purpose: As nurses struggle to adjust to an ever changing work environment and client base they are more and more susceptible to creating unproductive work environments by participating in lateral violence (LV). Emotional Intelligence (EI) is a trait found to be very positive in an employee. EI can help to predict an employee’s reaction to a stressful altercation and can lead to a more positive work environment. By correlating these traits, EI and participants of LV, the researcher sought to find a predictor of participation and an educational opportunity for leadership improvement. Design: The purpose of this quantitative correlation research is to look for patterns in nurses that do or do not participate in lateral violence (variable 1) and their emotional intelligence level (variable 2). Setting: The target audience for this research will be nurses in one facility. This convenience sampling will include nurses whose ages range from 20-70 years old. There are approximately 360 nurses who are employed by the facility. The nurses are predominately female with less than 20 male nurses. The predominant ethnicity is white Caucasian with the presence of white Latino, African American and Asian as well. The educational level of the nurses at this facility is approximately 25% BSN/MSN and 75% ASN/LPN. This facility is a community, not for profit hospital. Participants/Subjects: A convenience sampling of nurses will be used to gather participants in this study. The sample that will be included in the study is all nurses that work in a 106-bed facility. This is a form of nonrandom sampling and is ideal for this research because the more responses received will provide for a better picture to the research to include various units within a facility and various nurses with different roles. Methods: The TEIQue-SF questionnaire for emotional intelligence was used along with additional questions that asked specific scenarios that the nurse may have encountered in the past three months. The Pearson r coefficient was used to gain validity in descriptive statistics. Results: 71 out of 330 nurses participated. The questionnaire used ratio data from a measurable EI survey (variable 1) and included 7 Yes or No questions (variable 2) that had a nurse admit to or deny participation in LV. The Pearson r coefficient was used to correlate the two sets of data. The results showed a mild negative correlation of -0.32 which seeks to prove that those who have a higher level of EI are less likely to participate in LV. Implications: The results show a negative correlation and follow in the line of the literature review that was done for this study. This information can now be used in seeking improved work environments and as an educational opportunity for all nurses. The research is also a basis for a correlation of this trait and this behavior that can be available for further research.
Keywords:
Emotional Intelligence in Nursing; Lateral Volence in Nursing
Repository Posting Date:
4-Aug-2014
Date of Publication:
4-Aug-2014
Conference Date:
2014
Conference Name:
2014 ENA Leadership Conference
Conference Host:
Emergency Nurses Association
Conference Location:
Phoenix, Arizona USA
Description:
2014 ENA Leadership Conference Theme: Safe Practice, Safe Care. Held at the Phoenix Convention Center
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_GB
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_GB
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleEmotional Intelligence and Lateral Violence in Nursing: A Correlation Studyen_GB
dc.contributor.authorSlagle, Taraen_GB
dc.contributor.authorFitch, Tammyen_GB
dc.author.detailsTara Slagle, MSN, RN, email: taraslagle@gmail.com; Tammy Fitchen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/324144-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: As nurses struggle to adjust to an ever changing work environment and client base they are more and more susceptible to creating unproductive work environments by participating in lateral violence (LV). Emotional Intelligence (EI) is a trait found to be very positive in an employee. EI can help to predict an employee’s reaction to a stressful altercation and can lead to a more positive work environment. By correlating these traits, EI and participants of LV, the researcher sought to find a predictor of participation and an educational opportunity for leadership improvement. Design: The purpose of this quantitative correlation research is to look for patterns in nurses that do or do not participate in lateral violence (variable 1) and their emotional intelligence level (variable 2). Setting: The target audience for this research will be nurses in one facility. This convenience sampling will include nurses whose ages range from 20-70 years old. There are approximately 360 nurses who are employed by the facility. The nurses are predominately female with less than 20 male nurses. The predominant ethnicity is white Caucasian with the presence of white Latino, African American and Asian as well. The educational level of the nurses at this facility is approximately 25% BSN/MSN and 75% ASN/LPN. This facility is a community, not for profit hospital. Participants/Subjects: A convenience sampling of nurses will be used to gather participants in this study. The sample that will be included in the study is all nurses that work in a 106-bed facility. This is a form of nonrandom sampling and is ideal for this research because the more responses received will provide for a better picture to the research to include various units within a facility and various nurses with different roles. Methods: The TEIQue-SF questionnaire for emotional intelligence was used along with additional questions that asked specific scenarios that the nurse may have encountered in the past three months. The Pearson r coefficient was used to gain validity in descriptive statistics. Results: 71 out of 330 nurses participated. The questionnaire used ratio data from a measurable EI survey (variable 1) and included 7 Yes or No questions (variable 2) that had a nurse admit to or deny participation in LV. The Pearson r coefficient was used to correlate the two sets of data. The results showed a mild negative correlation of -0.32 which seeks to prove that those who have a higher level of EI are less likely to participate in LV. Implications: The results show a negative correlation and follow in the line of the literature review that was done for this study. This information can now be used in seeking improved work environments and as an educational opportunity for all nurses. The research is also a basis for a correlation of this trait and this behavior that can be available for further research.en_GB
dc.subjectEmotional Intelligence in Nursingen_GB
dc.subjectLateral Volence in Nursingen_GB
dc.date.available2014-08-04T13:27:54Z-
dc.date.issued2014-08-04-
dc.date.accessioned2014-08-04T13:27:54Z-
dc.conference.date2014en_GB
dc.conference.name2014 ENA Leadership Conferenceen_GB
dc.conference.hostEmergency Nurses Associationen_GB
dc.conference.locationPhoenix, Arizona USAen_GB
dc.description2014 ENA Leadership Conference Theme: Safe Practice, Safe Care. Held at the Phoenix Convention Centeren_GB
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.en_GB
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