2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/324145
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
A synergy Project: Ultrasound Guided-Peripheral Intravenous Access
Author(s):
Hodge, Angela
Author Details:
Angela Hodge, MSN, RN, CEN, ACNS-BC, EMT-P, email: hodgea@somc.org
Abstract:
Evidence-based Practice Abstract Purpose: Patients with prior drug abuse, obesity, chronic health problems, vascular comorbidities, and the young or aged can have significant intravenous access problems. Failure to obtain peripheral intravenous access cause drains on healthcare resources, delays in diagnosis/treatment, patient dissatisfaction, and may expose patients to complications associated with central venous access. Design: A literature search using CINAHL and Medline was conducted to validate the emergency department’s small sample head to head non-inferior research trial and to assist in developing a nursing protocol and educational/competency program for ultrasound guided peripheral intravenous access. Emergency Department Nurses using clinical inquiry asked for the ability to use ultrasound for venous access. Setting: A 220 bed non-profit, Magnet designated, teaching hospital in a small rural community in Ohio. Nurses practice in out-patient and in-patient settings. Emergency Services includes one Emergency Department and four Urgent Care Centers. Emergency Services see 100,000 adult and pediatric visits annually and have a total of 210 staff members. An in-patient Pediatric Unit is housed within the ED. Participants/Subjects: Registered Nurses in an acute adult and pediatric emergency department who perform peripheral intravenous access were selected to participate in an education/competency program based upon the finding of the literature search. Methods: Using the Iowa Model of evidence based practice to promote quality care, twenty articles were reviewed. The emergency department research trial’s null hypothesis of the no significant difference between Nurses and Resident’s success rates was validate. Results/Outcomes: Ultrasound –guided peripheral intravenous access techniques are safe, rapid, and have a high success rate. Benefits of ultrasound –guided techniques are decreased patient throughput, cost reductions, decreasing complications, increased patient and emergency medicine physician satisfaction, and emergency nurse autonomy. There are also shorter access time, less skin punctures, fewer complications, and increased patient satisfaction. Implications: Nurses can influence the care of patients with unmet needs for venous access by presenting a viable alternative to repeated attempts. Using the Synergy Model, nurses’ clinical inquiry and advocacy in a caring environment positively impacted vulnerable, complex patients. A nursing procedure policy was developed. An education/program was developed based upon adult learning principles. Registered nurses independently review a PowerPoint on the organizational workforce development intranet site. After completion of the didactic component, nurses attend a class demonstration of the ultrasound guided peripheral intravenous access procedure and perform a return demonstration. A preceptor is assigned and the nurse must complete two successful ultrasound guided intravenous accesses prior to performing independently. Emergency Department rate of successful intravenous access using ultrasound will continue to be monitored. The education/competency program is extending to the Intensive Care Unit
Keywords:
Ultrasound Guided-Peripheral Intravenous Access
Repository Posting Date:
4-Aug-2014
Date of Publication:
4-Aug-2014
Conference Date:
2014
Conference Name:
2014 ENA Leadership Conference
Conference Host:
Emergency Nurses Association
Conference Location:
Phoenix, Arizona USA
Description:
2014 ENA Leadership Conference Theme: Safe Practice, Safe Care. Held at the Phoenix Convention Center
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_GB
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_GB
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleA synergy Project: Ultrasound Guided-Peripheral Intravenous Accessen_GB
dc.contributor.authorHodge, Angelaen_GB
dc.author.detailsAngela Hodge, MSN, RN, CEN, ACNS-BC, EMT-P, email: hodgea@somc.orgen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/324145-
dc.description.abstractEvidence-based Practice Abstract Purpose: Patients with prior drug abuse, obesity, chronic health problems, vascular comorbidities, and the young or aged can have significant intravenous access problems. Failure to obtain peripheral intravenous access cause drains on healthcare resources, delays in diagnosis/treatment, patient dissatisfaction, and may expose patients to complications associated with central venous access. Design: A literature search using CINAHL and Medline was conducted to validate the emergency department’s small sample head to head non-inferior research trial and to assist in developing a nursing protocol and educational/competency program for ultrasound guided peripheral intravenous access. Emergency Department Nurses using clinical inquiry asked for the ability to use ultrasound for venous access. Setting: A 220 bed non-profit, Magnet designated, teaching hospital in a small rural community in Ohio. Nurses practice in out-patient and in-patient settings. Emergency Services includes one Emergency Department and four Urgent Care Centers. Emergency Services see 100,000 adult and pediatric visits annually and have a total of 210 staff members. An in-patient Pediatric Unit is housed within the ED. Participants/Subjects: Registered Nurses in an acute adult and pediatric emergency department who perform peripheral intravenous access were selected to participate in an education/competency program based upon the finding of the literature search. Methods: Using the Iowa Model of evidence based practice to promote quality care, twenty articles were reviewed. The emergency department research trial’s null hypothesis of the no significant difference between Nurses and Resident’s success rates was validate. Results/Outcomes: Ultrasound –guided peripheral intravenous access techniques are safe, rapid, and have a high success rate. Benefits of ultrasound –guided techniques are decreased patient throughput, cost reductions, decreasing complications, increased patient and emergency medicine physician satisfaction, and emergency nurse autonomy. There are also shorter access time, less skin punctures, fewer complications, and increased patient satisfaction. Implications: Nurses can influence the care of patients with unmet needs for venous access by presenting a viable alternative to repeated attempts. Using the Synergy Model, nurses’ clinical inquiry and advocacy in a caring environment positively impacted vulnerable, complex patients. A nursing procedure policy was developed. An education/program was developed based upon adult learning principles. Registered nurses independently review a PowerPoint on the organizational workforce development intranet site. After completion of the didactic component, nurses attend a class demonstration of the ultrasound guided peripheral intravenous access procedure and perform a return demonstration. A preceptor is assigned and the nurse must complete two successful ultrasound guided intravenous accesses prior to performing independently. Emergency Department rate of successful intravenous access using ultrasound will continue to be monitored. The education/competency program is extending to the Intensive Care Uniten_GB
dc.subjectUltrasound Guided-Peripheral Intravenous Accessen_GB
dc.date.available2014-08-04T13:28:20Z-
dc.date.issued2014-08-04-
dc.date.accessioned2014-08-04T13:28:20Z-
dc.conference.date2014en_GB
dc.conference.name2014 ENA Leadership Conferenceen_GB
dc.conference.hostEmergency Nurses Associationen_GB
dc.conference.locationPhoenix, Arizona USAen_GB
dc.description2014 ENA Leadership Conference Theme: Safe Practice, Safe Care. Held at the Phoenix Convention Centeren_GB
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.en_GB
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