8.00
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/324146
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Sepsis Alert to Recognize and Treat Patients Faster
Author(s):
Wells, Alexandra
Author Details:
Alexandra Wells, BSN, RN, CEN, email: awells@uhcc.com
Abstract:
Evidence-based Practice Abstract Purpose: Every few seconds someone in the world dies of sepsis. Rapid initiation of simple, timely interventions, including antimicrobials and IV fluids, can reduce the risk of death by half. The goal is for the patient to receive antibiotics within 1 hour of the recognition of sepsis. The early recognition and treatment for patients with sepsis is critical. Emergency Department nurses play a crucial role since they make the first contact with the patient. Design: To evaluate the effect of the use of sepsis screening criteria in triage on the nurses ability to recognize early warning signs of sepsis and decrease time to treatment for these patients. Setting: Community Based Hospital. Participants: A sepsis alert was activated for any patient presenting to triage nurse that exhibited two of the Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome (SIRS) criteria. These include hyperthermia/hypothermia, tachypnea, tachycardia and hypotension. Specific vital sign parameters were provided in the triage area. The alert brought available nurses, technicians and a physician to the bedside to start the patient’s evaluation and treatment. A specific order set was used for sepsis alert patients, which includes complete blood count, comprehensive metabolic panel, urinalysis, lactate and blood cultures. Methods: For three weeks prior to introduction of process, staff was educated by emails, in person briefings and education displays in the unit.. Laminated cards with the list of criteria were placed on all computers as quick references for the nurses. A log of all the sepsis alerts was maintained. All alerts were compared with a report of all the patients with a discharge or/and admission diagnosis of sepsis. Results: During the first month of data collection, 47 sepsis alerts were initiated. 28% (13 patients) of alerts resulted in positive early identification of sepsis. Based on discharge or admission diagnosis, 37 patients were diagnosed with sepsis. Of those 37, 13 (35%) were identified by the screening criteria, 12 (32%) did not meet established SIRS criteria, 12 (32%) meet the criteria but were not identified by the triage nurse. Data collection is ongoing at this time. Implications: Based on the first month’s data, with increased nurse recognition of SIRS criteria, 67% of sepsis patients would have benefited from early identification and treatment. Continued review of process and reeducation of staff is worthwhile to encourage increased compliance with screening criteria to promote improved patient outcomes with early treatment for sepsis.
Keywords:
Sepsis Alert
Repository Posting Date:
4-Aug-2014
Date of Publication:
4-Aug-2014
Conference Date:
2014
Conference Name:
2014 ENA Leadership Conference
Conference Host:
Emergency Nurses Association
Conference Location:
Phoenix, Arizona USA
Description:
2014 ENA Leadership Conference Theme: Safe Practice, Safe Care. Held at the Phoenix Convention Center
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_GB
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_GB
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleSepsis Alert to Recognize and Treat Patients Fasteren_GB
dc.contributor.authorWells, Alexandraen_GB
dc.author.detailsAlexandra Wells, BSN, RN, CEN, email: awells@uhcc.comen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/324146-
dc.description.abstractEvidence-based Practice Abstract Purpose: Every few seconds someone in the world dies of sepsis. Rapid initiation of simple, timely interventions, including antimicrobials and IV fluids, can reduce the risk of death by half. The goal is for the patient to receive antibiotics within 1 hour of the recognition of sepsis. The early recognition and treatment for patients with sepsis is critical. Emergency Department nurses play a crucial role since they make the first contact with the patient. Design: To evaluate the effect of the use of sepsis screening criteria in triage on the nurses ability to recognize early warning signs of sepsis and decrease time to treatment for these patients. Setting: Community Based Hospital. Participants: A sepsis alert was activated for any patient presenting to triage nurse that exhibited two of the Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome (SIRS) criteria. These include hyperthermia/hypothermia, tachypnea, tachycardia and hypotension. Specific vital sign parameters were provided in the triage area. The alert brought available nurses, technicians and a physician to the bedside to start the patient’s evaluation and treatment. A specific order set was used for sepsis alert patients, which includes complete blood count, comprehensive metabolic panel, urinalysis, lactate and blood cultures. Methods: For three weeks prior to introduction of process, staff was educated by emails, in person briefings and education displays in the unit.. Laminated cards with the list of criteria were placed on all computers as quick references for the nurses. A log of all the sepsis alerts was maintained. All alerts were compared with a report of all the patients with a discharge or/and admission diagnosis of sepsis. Results: During the first month of data collection, 47 sepsis alerts were initiated. 28% (13 patients) of alerts resulted in positive early identification of sepsis. Based on discharge or admission diagnosis, 37 patients were diagnosed with sepsis. Of those 37, 13 (35%) were identified by the screening criteria, 12 (32%) did not meet established SIRS criteria, 12 (32%) meet the criteria but were not identified by the triage nurse. Data collection is ongoing at this time. Implications: Based on the first month’s data, with increased nurse recognition of SIRS criteria, 67% of sepsis patients would have benefited from early identification and treatment. Continued review of process and reeducation of staff is worthwhile to encourage increased compliance with screening criteria to promote improved patient outcomes with early treatment for sepsis.en_GB
dc.subjectSepsis Alerten_GB
dc.date.available2014-08-04T13:28:21Z-
dc.date.issued2014-08-04-
dc.date.accessioned2014-08-04T13:28:21Z-
dc.conference.date2014en_GB
dc.conference.name2014 ENA Leadership Conferenceen_GB
dc.conference.hostEmergency Nurses Associationen_GB
dc.conference.locationPhoenix, Arizona USAen_GB
dc.description2014 ENA Leadership Conference Theme: Safe Practice, Safe Care. Held at the Phoenix Convention Centeren_GB
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.en_GB
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