11.00
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/324155
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Horizontal Hostility Among Emergency Nurses in a Level 1 Trauma Center
Author(s):
Liska, Heather
Author Details:
Heather Liska, MPA, BSN, RN, CEN, email: heatherliska@centura.org
Abstract:
Research Abstract -Research Poster Award Winner Purpose: Horizontal hostility (HH) is defined as, “sabotage directed at coworkers who are on the same level within an organization’s hierarchy.” Studies have shown that up to 90.7% of nurses have experienced or witnessed HH in the work place This behavior can lead to devastating effects for the recipient, such as diminished productivity, increased absenteeism, burnout, leaving the profession, anxiety, depression, post traumatic stress disorder, and suicide. This research is designed to answer the question: Does horizontal hostility exist among the nursing staff in the emergency department of a level 1 trauma center; and if so, what are the contributing factors? Design: A quantitative design using validated survey questions was used to gather primary data. Setting: Emergency department of a metropolitan level 1 trauma center. Participants: The sample included all emergency nursing employees of this emergency department. Float pool and contract nurses were excluded. Methods: Survey Monkey, an online survey instrument, was utilized via a link provided on the nursing employee’s email account. A correlation matrix was run for all variables. Pearson r and Pearson Chi-square was used in this study to determine the direction and strength of the relationship between variables using SPSS version 20. Due to the small sample size (N=63) with a response rate of 68 percent (43/63), the level chosen for significance of data is p< .10. Correlations between the primary independent variables (self-esteem, perception of the value of nursing, perception of the value of nursing by others, perceived control, years of experience, violence in the workplace, poor conflict resolution skills, moral distress, and supervisory support), and the dependent variable, horizontal hostility were examined. The dependent variable, horizontal hostility, was measured five ways: the prevalence of criticizing, the prevalence of making hurtful remarks, complaining about a co-worker, raising eyebrows or eye rolling, and pretending not to notice a co-worker struggling with his or her workload. Results: The research demonstrated the existence of horizontal hostility in 100% of the nurses surveyed, although the prevalence was lower in comparison with national data. The level of support from the immediate supervisor played a crucial role in the prevalence of horizontal hostility as well as the perception of top-level administration’s value of nursing. One of the most common forms of HH was strongly related to self-esteem, nursing’s perceived value to society, perceived value of nursing to physicians, and moderately related to abuse at work. Over half of the nurses reported experiencing verbal or physical abuse from any source on a weekly or daily basis; this frequency was correlation with three out of five aspects of horizontal hostility. Implications: Exemplary supervisory and top-level administrative support are essential elements associated with mitigating the effects of horizontal hostility with this specific demographic of nurses. Improving healthy relationships among the medical and nursing staff as well as diligent efforts to decrease violence in the workplace should prove to be beneficial in the effort to mitigate the effects of horizontal hostility in this setting, and thus promote staff retention, performance, job satisfaction, and overall well-being.
Keywords:
Horizontal Hostility
Repository Posting Date:
4-Aug-2014
Date of Publication:
4-Aug-2014
Conference Date:
2014
Conference Name:
2014 ENA Leadership Conference
Conference Host:
Emergency Nurses Association
Conference Location:
Phoenix, Arizona USA
Description:
2014 ENA Leadership Conference Theme: Safe Practice, Safe Care. Held at the Phoenix Convention Center
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_GB
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_GB
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleHorizontal Hostility Among Emergency Nurses in a Level 1 Trauma Centeren_GB
dc.contributor.authorLiska, Heatheren_GB
dc.author.detailsHeather Liska, MPA, BSN, RN, CEN, email: heatherliska@centura.orgen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/324155-
dc.description.abstractResearch Abstract -Research Poster Award Winner Purpose: Horizontal hostility (HH) is defined as, “sabotage directed at coworkers who are on the same level within an organization’s hierarchy.” Studies have shown that up to 90.7% of nurses have experienced or witnessed HH in the work place This behavior can lead to devastating effects for the recipient, such as diminished productivity, increased absenteeism, burnout, leaving the profession, anxiety, depression, post traumatic stress disorder, and suicide. This research is designed to answer the question: Does horizontal hostility exist among the nursing staff in the emergency department of a level 1 trauma center; and if so, what are the contributing factors? Design: A quantitative design using validated survey questions was used to gather primary data. Setting: Emergency department of a metropolitan level 1 trauma center. Participants: The sample included all emergency nursing employees of this emergency department. Float pool and contract nurses were excluded. Methods: Survey Monkey, an online survey instrument, was utilized via a link provided on the nursing employee’s email account. A correlation matrix was run for all variables. Pearson r and Pearson Chi-square was used in this study to determine the direction and strength of the relationship between variables using SPSS version 20. Due to the small sample size (N=63) with a response rate of 68 percent (43/63), the level chosen for significance of data is p< .10. Correlations between the primary independent variables (self-esteem, perception of the value of nursing, perception of the value of nursing by others, perceived control, years of experience, violence in the workplace, poor conflict resolution skills, moral distress, and supervisory support), and the dependent variable, horizontal hostility were examined. The dependent variable, horizontal hostility, was measured five ways: the prevalence of criticizing, the prevalence of making hurtful remarks, complaining about a co-worker, raising eyebrows or eye rolling, and pretending not to notice a co-worker struggling with his or her workload. Results: The research demonstrated the existence of horizontal hostility in 100% of the nurses surveyed, although the prevalence was lower in comparison with national data. The level of support from the immediate supervisor played a crucial role in the prevalence of horizontal hostility as well as the perception of top-level administration’s value of nursing. One of the most common forms of HH was strongly related to self-esteem, nursing’s perceived value to society, perceived value of nursing to physicians, and moderately related to abuse at work. Over half of the nurses reported experiencing verbal or physical abuse from any source on a weekly or daily basis; this frequency was correlation with three out of five aspects of horizontal hostility. Implications: Exemplary supervisory and top-level administrative support are essential elements associated with mitigating the effects of horizontal hostility with this specific demographic of nurses. Improving healthy relationships among the medical and nursing staff as well as diligent efforts to decrease violence in the workplace should prove to be beneficial in the effort to mitigate the effects of horizontal hostility in this setting, and thus promote staff retention, performance, job satisfaction, and overall well-being.en_GB
dc.subjectHorizontal Hostilityen_GB
dc.date.available2014-08-04T13:28:30Z-
dc.date.issued2014-08-04-
dc.date.accessioned2014-08-04T13:28:30Z-
dc.conference.date2014en_GB
dc.conference.name2014 ENA Leadership Conferenceen_GB
dc.conference.hostEmergency Nurses Associationen_GB
dc.conference.locationPhoenix, Arizona USAen_GB
dc.description2014 ENA Leadership Conference Theme: Safe Practice, Safe Care. Held at the Phoenix Convention Centeren_GB
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.en_GB
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