2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/324156
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Force Feeding Education Doesn't Work - Inclusion Does!
Author(s):
Barron, Rebecca
Author Details:
Rebecca Barron, MS, RN, CEN, email: rebecca.barron@alexian.net
Abstract:
Evidence-based Practice Abstract Purpose: Nurses are overwhelmed with the amount of change occurring at a rapid fire pace. Process changes that are not well implemented will have inconsistent outcomes. In January of 2013 our hospital administration decided our emergency department was to become an “Emergency Department for seniors”. This extremely large endeavor which includes physical plant construction as well as process changes would have to be implemented differently to achieve intended results. When planning the education the concept of inclusion was utilized in order to retain a sense of unity through a project of this size. Design: Inclusion is any and every way an educator purposefully creates an environment that is comfortable, respectful and welcome. This was a staff development project that included collaborative plan of implementation in which the participants are respected and play an active role. Setting: Suburban Level II Trauma/ Comprehensive Stroke center in the Chicago area. Participants: All staff nurses and patient care technicians, approximately 70 registered nurses and 25 patient care technicians, attended one of the seven offered classes. The classes were scheduled for 8 hours in length and staff was awarded continuing education hours through the American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC). Methods: Educators can cultivate an inclusive class through respect, transparency and motivational strategies. The class was incorporated into their weekly FTE to be respectful of the staff’s time and ensure attendance. Using poetry, videos, images and open ended questioning we were able to achieve productive dialogue, promote reflection and honest feedback. Senior sensitivity exercises were facilitated to highlight visual and mobility changes that occur in the elderly as well as polypharmacy. The process changes that we planned were explained with their rationale. All staff was provided the opportunity to voice their opinion in a non threatening environment. Staff left knowing that leadership valued their opinion and were willing to make changes as necessary throughout the implementation. Outcomes: At the beginning of the class, staff was very uncertain about the project and the need for a class of this length. Initially staff was reserved and tentative but as the day progressed they realized that discussion was a vital component to the success of the program. Staff was highly vocal about the proposed changes and offered excellent ideas as well as constructive criticism. Because the care of seniors can be linked to both personal and professional experiences, many times the discussions elicited open emotional responses. The exercises ended up being an enjoyable group activity that simultaneously promoted team spirit as well as brought awareness to the challenges seniors face. The class was very well received and the implementation of the new senior services was implemented calmly. Implications: The lines of communication between staff and leadership around implementation continue to be open as we perfect our chosen processes. Maintaining inclusion involves every aspect of the lesson from preparation to evaluation. Staffs that are active participants rather than passengers when learning will retain more information because they can link it to an activity or personal event in class.
Keywords:
Education by Inclusion
Repository Posting Date:
4-Aug-2014
Date of Publication:
4-Aug-2014
Conference Date:
2014
Conference Name:
2014 ENA Leadership Conference
Conference Host:
Emergency Nurses Association
Conference Location:
Phoenix, Arizona USA
Description:
2014 ENA Leadership Conference Theme: Safe Practice, Safe Care. Held at the Phoenix Convention Center
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_GB
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_GB
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleForce Feeding Education Doesn't Work - Inclusion Does!en_GB
dc.contributor.authorBarron, Rebeccaen_GB
dc.author.detailsRebecca Barron, MS, RN, CEN, email: rebecca.barron@alexian.neten_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/324156-
dc.description.abstractEvidence-based Practice Abstract Purpose: Nurses are overwhelmed with the amount of change occurring at a rapid fire pace. Process changes that are not well implemented will have inconsistent outcomes. In January of 2013 our hospital administration decided our emergency department was to become an “Emergency Department for seniors”. This extremely large endeavor which includes physical plant construction as well as process changes would have to be implemented differently to achieve intended results. When planning the education the concept of inclusion was utilized in order to retain a sense of unity through a project of this size. Design: Inclusion is any and every way an educator purposefully creates an environment that is comfortable, respectful and welcome. This was a staff development project that included collaborative plan of implementation in which the participants are respected and play an active role. Setting: Suburban Level II Trauma/ Comprehensive Stroke center in the Chicago area. Participants: All staff nurses and patient care technicians, approximately 70 registered nurses and 25 patient care technicians, attended one of the seven offered classes. The classes were scheduled for 8 hours in length and staff was awarded continuing education hours through the American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC). Methods: Educators can cultivate an inclusive class through respect, transparency and motivational strategies. The class was incorporated into their weekly FTE to be respectful of the staff’s time and ensure attendance. Using poetry, videos, images and open ended questioning we were able to achieve productive dialogue, promote reflection and honest feedback. Senior sensitivity exercises were facilitated to highlight visual and mobility changes that occur in the elderly as well as polypharmacy. The process changes that we planned were explained with their rationale. All staff was provided the opportunity to voice their opinion in a non threatening environment. Staff left knowing that leadership valued their opinion and were willing to make changes as necessary throughout the implementation. Outcomes: At the beginning of the class, staff was very uncertain about the project and the need for a class of this length. Initially staff was reserved and tentative but as the day progressed they realized that discussion was a vital component to the success of the program. Staff was highly vocal about the proposed changes and offered excellent ideas as well as constructive criticism. Because the care of seniors can be linked to both personal and professional experiences, many times the discussions elicited open emotional responses. The exercises ended up being an enjoyable group activity that simultaneously promoted team spirit as well as brought awareness to the challenges seniors face. The class was very well received and the implementation of the new senior services was implemented calmly. Implications: The lines of communication between staff and leadership around implementation continue to be open as we perfect our chosen processes. Maintaining inclusion involves every aspect of the lesson from preparation to evaluation. Staffs that are active participants rather than passengers when learning will retain more information because they can link it to an activity or personal event in class.en_GB
dc.subjectEducation by Inclusionen_GB
dc.date.available2014-08-04T13:28:31Z-
dc.date.issued2014-08-04-
dc.date.accessioned2014-08-04T13:28:31Z-
dc.conference.date2014en_GB
dc.conference.name2014 ENA Leadership Conferenceen_GB
dc.conference.hostEmergency Nurses Associationen_GB
dc.conference.locationPhoenix, Arizona USAen_GB
dc.description2014 ENA Leadership Conference Theme: Safe Practice, Safe Care. Held at the Phoenix Convention Centeren_GB
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.en_GB
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